Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2538419 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 16, 1951
Filing dateMar 16, 1946
Priority dateMar 16, 1946
Publication numberUS 2538419 A, US 2538419A, US-A-2538419, US2538419 A, US2538419A
InventorsOwen H Huston, John S John
Original AssigneeElectro Mechanical Res Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Waterproof headset
US 2538419 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 16, 1951 o. H. HUSTON ET AL 2,538,419

WATERPROOF HEADSET Filed March 16, 1946 I 2 Sheets-Sheet l .Fjigl.

1951 o. H. HUSTON ET AL 2,538,419

WATERPROOF HEADSET Filed March 16, 1946 Y 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 WATTOR/YEY Patented Jan. 16, 1951 WATERPROOF HEADSET Owen H. Huston and John S. John, Houston, Tex., assignors to Electro-Mechanical Research, Inc., Houston, Tex., a corporation of Texas Application March 16, 1946, Serial No. 654,880

. 1 This invention relates to headsets for use in telephony, radio, telegraph and signalling devices, and it relates particularly to waterproof headsets.

ing under adverse conditions of humidity, damp-- ness or water immersion. Attempts have been made to waterproof headphones by encasing them in rubber. However, these attempts have .not been successful for the reason that the intensity of the signal is decreased by the presence of the rubber cover to such an extent as to render the earphones practically unuseable, One reason for the diminution in the signal is that rubbery materials are poor conductors of sounds and vibrations; Another reason is that when the cover is applied over the front or ear-engaging portion of the earphone, the cover has a tendency to damp the sound even when the earphone was subjected to atmospheric pressure. When the earphone is subjected to superatmospheric pressure as, for example, when the earphone is immersed in water, the rubber cover is pressed tightly against the earphone casing leaving only a very small area free and unsupported and able to vibrate with the air columns in the holes in the I ear phone cap.

j mospheric pressure.

Other objects of the invention will become apparent from the following description of typical earphones and headsets embodying the present invention.

4 Claims. (Cl. 179-456) In accordance with the present invention, earphones and headsets are provided which are characterized by the presence of a complete waterproof covering for the earphones and the connecting cords or conductors, the earphone earphone to transmit vibrations without substantial loss of efficiency.

.More particularly, the earphone itself is modified to the extent of the removal of the center portion of the earphone cap to provide an enlarged opening therein, and the waterproof covering is provided with a thin diaphragm portion that is normally spaced from the earphone cap so that it is responsive to vibration of the diaphragm and acts as a secondary diaphragm for the transmission of sound to the ear. When earphones'or headsets embodying the invention are. subjected to increased pressure, the diaphragm portion of the waterproof cover is displaced into contact with the earphone casing or cap, but the: center portion of the waterproof cover overlying the opening in the earphone cap remains in spaced relationship to the vibratable diaphragm of the earphone and follows its vibrations because of the large air column therebetween. As a result, the covered earphone operates with good efficiency under ordinary pressures and even when under a hydrostatic head as great as 10 feet of Water.

For a better understandin of the present invention, reference may be had to the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1' is a view in front elevation of a typical headset embodying the present invention;

Figure 2 is a View in side elevation of the headset with a part of the connecting cords broken away;

Figure 3 is a view of a single earphone with the waterproof cover thereonshown in section; and

Figure 4 is a view in front elevation of the earphone shown somewhat enlarged and with the waterproof cover removed.

As illustrated in Figure 1, the headset consists of a pair of earphones l0 and H which are connected by means of a headband I Z. The two earphoneassemblies land H are connected by means of waterproof cords l3 and M to a junction box l5which is covered with waterproof sheath and is connected to a signalling device by awaterproof cord l6.

The earphones H1 and II are substantially identical and, therefore, only one of the earphones will be described hereinafter.

Referring now to Figure 3, a complete earphone assembly I I may include an earphone ll of any conventional type, for example, one including an electromagnetic element and a vibratablediaphragm 30, enclosed in a casing l8. The casing l8 may be formed of hard rubber or other cover 20.

material and includes a back casing element l8a of generally cylindrical form and an enlarged cylindrical cap or earpiece [8b. Preferably, the periphery of the cap I81) is formed with a concave or curved surface I80 for a purpose to be described. Also, as shown in Figure 4, the cap l8b of the earphone I! is provided with an enlarged central opening lBd instead of the usual group of small openings. Ina typical earphone, the diameter of the central opening lSd may be about one inch. However, the opening I8d may be somewhat smaller or somewhat larger, as desired.

The earphone H is completely encased in a cover formed of rubbery material such as, for

example, a synthetic rubber known as neoprene of about 35 durometer hardness. Neoprene is a polymer of chloroprene having the general Other synthetic or natural rubbers also are-entirely satisfactory.

The casing or cover for the earphone El preferably is made up of two sections, namely, an outer cover l9 and an earphone cup or front The outer cover i9 is of generally cup-shaped form having a recessed portion Ella for receiving the base of the earphone 18a and an external .flange portion I912 overlying and engagingthe concave periphery I80 of the ear- .phone cap v[8b. The outer cover I9 is also provided with a tubular sleeve 19c integral therewith through whichthe wires or cords of the earphones are passed.

The earphone cupiZUis ofv generally cup-shaped 'formadapted to fit over the ear and is provided with-a vrearwardly-extending flange 20a adapted to overlap the flange l9?) on the outercover member.

The earphone cup 20 is also provided with a thin diaphragm portion 201) which isof some what greater diameter than the opening l8d in the earphone cap I812. The diaphragm portion 20b is normally spaced from the earphone .cap

7 I81) by meansof a circular shoulder 200 formed integrally with the earphone cup 213. The diaphragm 26b is sufficiently flexible to follow the vibrations of the diaphragm in the earphone H.

In assembling the outer cover l9 and'the earphone cup 20, the outer cover I9is applied to" the earphone El and the flange 28a of the cup 20 is then telescoped over the flange I9b, the flanges [9b and Zila being cemented together. A'metallic band or strap 2! is placed around the flange 20a andis drawn up tightly by means'of a'bolt 22 (Figures 1 and 2) which passes through ears 23 on opposite ends of the strap 2!, thereby compressing the flanges [91) and a into 'the'con cave periphery 180 of the earphone caplii. Also, .to reinforce the outer cover and provide a support for .the earphonaa spider 24 formed of metal is fitted over the outer cover 19 and has its armsZ-Qa welded or otherwise secured to the strap 21.

The strap 2! is provided with a laterally directed flange or plate 25 to whichtheheadband I2 is secured. This flange or-plate 25-is provided with a plurality of openings 25a which receive rivets or screws '26 that have their opposite ends anchored in a U-shaped spring platejZ'l. The end of the headband I2 is disposedbetween the plate 25 and the spring plate 2"! and is provided with a slot '28 for receiving the rivets 26 and permitting slidingadjustment of the earphone assembly alongthe headbandll.

The cord I4 is provided with a rubber or synthetic rubber cover and is cemented into the sleeve I90 and secured there by means of a wrapping of cord 29 Or the like. Thus, the earphone I! and all of the cords and other connecting elements are completely covered with waterproof material so that prolonged immersion of the headset in water will not short circuit, or prevent operation of, the headphone.

In operation, when the, headset is applied to :the ears, the vibratable diaphragms within the earphone assemblies in and II will set up vibrationsin the column of air between the diaphragms and the diaphragm portions 2%. Inasmuch as each-diaphragm portion 20b vibrates with the diaphragm of its associated earphone, efiective sound transmission is obtained.

If the headset is immersed in water, the entire waterproof cover for each earphone I1 is subjected to increased pressure and the diaphragm portion 20b of the cover will be compresed against ing the present invention are capable of satisfactoryoperation without severe loss of efilciency when subjectedto hydrostatic heads asgreat as 1.0 feet. Therefore, it will be apparent that a truly waterproof headset has'beenprovidedwhich operates efliciently'under the most adverse conditions expected to be encountered in its use.

It will be understood that the design and shape of the elements may be modified considerably and that the mechanism for securing the headphone to the headband may be variedwidely. Therefore,'the form of the invention described 'herein should be considered as illustrative and not as limiting the scope of the following claims.

We claim: 1. A waterproof headphone comprising'an earphone having an earpiece'provided with a centrally located opening, a vibratable diaphragm behind said earpiece, electrical means for 'vibrating said diaphragm anda-casing member joined to said earpiece and enclosing said diaphragm and electrical means; afirst'resilient waterproof cover member-overlying said earpiece, said cover member having a thin diaphragm portion-overlying said opening and spaced from said earpiece;

asecond resilient, waterproof'cover member overlying said casing member and telescopically'engaging an edge of said first cover member in watertight relationship; and a clamping band overlying the telescopically engaged portions of said cover members and having a laterally clirected flange thereon for engagement with a headband.

2. A waterproo'f'headphone comprising an earphone having an earpiece provided with'a centrally located opening, a vibratablediaphrag'm behind said earpiece,electrical meansfor vibrating said diaphragm and a casing member joined to said earpiece and enclosing said diaphragm andelectrical means; a first resilient waterproof *cover memberoverlying said earpiece, said cover V ber.

l member having a thin diaphragm portion overlying said opening and spaced from said earpiece; a second resilient, waterproof cover member overlying said casing member and telescopically engaging an edge of said first cover member in watertight relationship; a tubular, resilient portion projecting from said second cover member; a waterproof phone cord connected to electrical means and extending through said tubular portion in watertight relation thereto; and a clamping band overlying the telescopically engaged portions of said cover members and having a laterally directed flange thereon for engagement with a headband.

3. A waterproof headphone comprising an earphone having an earpiece provided with a centrally located opening, a vibratable diaphragm behind said earpiece, electrical means for vibrating said diaphragm and a casing member joined to said earpiece and enclosing said diaphragm "and electrical means; a-first resilient waterproof cover member overlying said earpiece, said cover member having a thin diaphragm portion over lying said opening and spaced from said earpiece; a second resilient, waterproof cover member overlying said casing member and telescopically engaging an edge of said first cover member in watertight relationship; and a clamping band overlying the telescopically engaged portions of said cover members and having a laterally directed flange thereon for engagement with a headband, and a spider member having arms secured to said clamping band and extending across the outside of said second cover mem- 4. A waterproof headphone comprising an earphone having an earpiece provided with a centrally located opening, a vibratable diaphragm behind said earpiece, electrical means for vibrating said diaphragm and a casing member joined to said earpiece and enclosing said diaphragm and electrical means; a first resilient waterproof cover member overlying said earpiece, said cover 7 member having a thin diaphragm portion overlying said opening and spaced from said earpiece; a second resilient, waterproof cover member overlying said casing member and telescopically engaging an edge of said first cover member in watertight relationship; a tubular, resilient portion projecting from said second cover member; a Waterproof phone cord connected to electrical means and extending through said tubular portion in watertight relation thereto; a clamping band overlying the telescopically engaged portions of said cover members and having a laterally directed flange thereon for engagement with a headband; and a spider member having arms secured to said clamping band and extending across the outside of said second cover member.

OWEN H. HUSTON. JOHN S. JOHN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,223,545 Whitman Apr. 24, 1917 1,365,423 Shewhart Jan. 11, 1921 2,345,996 Anderson et a1. Apr. 4, 1944 2,410,805 Black Nov. 12, 1946

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1223545 *Dec 23, 1914Apr 24, 1917Randolph WhitmanAcoustic device.
US1365423 *Aug 28, 1919Jan 11, 1921Barrett CoProduction of resins
US2345996 *Dec 7, 1940Apr 4, 1944Rca CorpSignal translating apparatus
US2410805 *Jan 16, 1942Nov 12, 1946Bell Telephone Labor IncVibration detector
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2786102 *Nov 6, 1952Mar 19, 1957FriederEarphone apparatus
US2937244 *Oct 4, 1957May 17, 1960Jetronic Ind IncElectrical-acoustic transducer
US3172076 *Mar 7, 1963Mar 2, 1965Carlo AlinariApparatus for speech communication between divers
US4682363 *May 23, 1985Jul 21, 1987Jerry GoldfarbAmphibious personal audio system
US5625688 *Jun 15, 1995Apr 29, 1997Jing Mei Industrial Holdings, Ltd.Shower telephone
US5664015 *Oct 18, 1995Sep 2, 1997Jing Mei Industrial Holdings, Inc.Shower speaker telephone
US5741352 *Aug 19, 1996Apr 21, 1998Jing Mei Industrial Holdings, Ltd.Air cleaner
US8670586 *Sep 7, 2012Mar 11, 2014Bose CorporationCombining and waterproofing headphone port exits
US9301040Mar 14, 2014Mar 29, 2016Bose CorporationPressure equalization in earphones
US20110110553 *Nov 18, 2008May 12, 2011Ty-Techtronics Pty LtdHeadset
DE19711278A1 *Mar 18, 1997Sep 24, 1998Deutsche Telekom AgElectronic apparatus housing e.g. for cordless hand-held receiver
DE19711278B4 *Mar 18, 1997Jun 4, 2009Deutsche Telekom AgGerätegehäuse
EP1811806A2 *Jan 17, 2007Jul 25, 2007Kabushiki Kaisha Audio- TechnicaHeadphones
EP1811806A3 *Jan 17, 2007Oct 14, 2009Kabushiki Kaisha Audio- TechnicaHeadphones
Classifications
U.S. Classification379/437
International ClassificationH04R1/10
Cooperative ClassificationH04R1/1066, H04R1/1008, H04R1/44, H04R5/0335
European ClassificationH04R1/10A