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Publication numberUS2539171 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 23, 1951
Filing dateJun 12, 1945
Priority dateJun 12, 1945
Publication numberUS 2539171 A, US 2539171A, US-A-2539171, US2539171 A, US2539171A
InventorsYerkes John A
Original AssigneeYerkes John A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Staple remover
US 2539171 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 23, 1951 J. A. YERKES STAPLE REMOVER Filed June 12, 1945 13 35 Q by @6320 1 2 Sheets-$heet l INVENTOR. JOH N A. YERK E5 A. YERKEs STAPLE REMOVER Jan. 239

2 Sheets-Sheet 2 A '7'O QN Y5 36 44 JOHN A.YERKE5 BY 9-4W Filed June 12, 1945 Patented Jan. 23, 1951 UNiTE-D STAT-ES STAPLE REMOVER JohnA. Yerkes, New York, N.

Application lune I2, 1945, Seria'l-N ,9 Claims.

Another object is to provide astaple remover which upon a continuous gripping or operating movement willfirst engage the pulling jaws with the staple without damage to the stapled :material and then with the same gripping actuation secondarily lift "the staple out of the material, one jaw maintaining its engagement with the material while the other lifts the staple.

Another object of the invention is to provide a device which will uniformly withdraw both legs of the staple at the-same time.

Another object of the invention is to provide -a staple pulling device which may be operated by holding in the hand or by placing on the table.

These and other objects ofth'e invention wm become apparent from the following "description and drawings which are merely exemplary.

Figure 1 is a perspective view f the staple remover showing operation when held in "the hands.

Figure 2 is :a cross sectional elevation of the device when at rest.

Figure :3 is a bottom view of Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along the line and in the direction 4-4 of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along the line 5-5 of Figure 2 showing the relation of the staple and lifting jaw before the device is operated.

Figure 6 is a fragmentary sectional elevation showing the relation of the parts at the end of the primary movement after the jaws have been inserted under the staple.

Figure 7 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along the line 1'! of Figure 6.

Figure 8 is a fragmentary sectional elevation showing relation of the parts at the end of the secondary movement after the lifting jaw has completely removed the staple from thematerial.

Figure 9 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along .line 9-9 of Figure 8.

Figure 10 is a fragmentary sectional view generally similar to Figure 9 with the exception that the jaws have not completed their movement u Tammany,

cleanses) come nnelinched "Thain as the start. of a me-leg withdrawal 'c'on" n n; r

Figure 11-1 is siniila;iito" Figure l gexcept that leted their movement -and ithilrawn co letel'y.

to b 1? illustrate rocker arm or 1 thin -metal D seen in v Figure 1 pei uqn cons sts ofa depending arm #01 portionsst the extremity of which the metal is bent outwardly, substantially at right angles'ito tfie 8,=t"o form retaming means-t. 8"*by-'any-'suitable means, :suc 11537 I "ardene'd litting- 'jaw i sa jaw. of an angle relate v but a teeter j onier of'iliftingjaw. of the space ror notcn suificientrtoipetfiii J staple .but to permit withdrawal or neg only es -w be explained hereafter. v nap 'iniel'itb'el :1 essay 'co IZby means o! rivet in 9 :tv hic suitable holes' insal ,7 omen r: a

oemg-ofererabiy of ;='relatively heavy section andnes'ten clcsel between the interior walls' 'o'f :gripssemter-rseasee give iaslid ing a; relationship.

Link 12 ber cep'ti'on of'rive't.

7 at "its end -f'o'r The re suitable holes 4 -lio' mg :15. "Housing 45 may be ma ma reotan arvmtform h-two parallel si dewdlls' litfi 'i arearwall la-and a floor snap-ea to form finger grip 5 a ever, may he 1cm was, I v 1 ble"--operation, was described "hereaft r. 'Ine'npper portion of housing liis' t ofien,-=for=the-paftial reception of grip ember er rocker arm ii, a -portion of which is e1eselyqisted betweenthe side walls 1/6 of housing flirt-the :m'e 3 being QHd-iflgffit Side walls I6 are cut away to form an opening 22 which enables the operator to see the jaws 2 and 3 in operation.

Guard or anvil jaw 3 is secured to front wall IT by any suitable means such, as rivet 23. Said jaw is preferably of hardened metal and is shaped to form a pair of prongs 24 and 25 (Figure 3) which are pointed and slightly sloped to facilitate their entr between the bridge of a staple and the material 'engag'edlbyhthe staple; Prongs 24 and 25 may-be"raisedasat 26 'and T2! to form a pair of abutments for limiting the relative movement between the prongs and the staple, but such abutments are not essential to the operation. The jaw 3 may be integral with the frame if desired although the form shown is preferable.

A leaf spring 28 is secured ,to link I2 by any suitable means such as by a screw '29 or a drive pin. As will be explained in the description of the operation of the iriyention, leaf spring 28 functions; as two separate springs;-,the upper half 30 acting between link I2 and -igrip; member I, the lower half 3I+acting= between-link I2 and housing I5.-

An abutment pin. 32,.ls.ecured-to housing I by.

riveting or .the like,';serves to'limit the forward (or counterclockwise) movement-pf link I2 which is urged forward by lower half 31' f spring 28.

.Similarly secured-'to'arm'yfl I grip member I is a guide pin 33 extendingthrouglr an arcuate guide-slot '34 formed-in housing-J fr-and; shaped substantially as she n the:E'igures 1, ;2,- 6, and 8; The use of saidl pirrtii; and-maid guide-slot 34 is'not essential-to the operation of the device but is desirable-for-maximum smoothness of operati depressing; arm I,,;the:.-;i;latiter procedure being known as on-desktoneratio Referring to Flgur esll-land. pressed firmly against stapled .rnaterialf I8, with the bridge 38'. of staple ig positioned: between the normally parted jaws.

Inthe primary or; engaging movement} 'grip member .I is depressed until-13111 35 abuts I 2; Upper half '38, of spring 2'8lyields. under-the pressure but lower half. 3; I"" s;;unaffected-Fand link I2 remain motionless: its extension, 8, are causeditd piivqtt clqckwise (Figtive-movement of jaws; andsS, toward-each other and under 'the bridge ot-the staple fis completed, as shown in'Flgure 6.-- Brongsg, and 25 of guard jaw 3 and also lifting .iaw;2 haye now been'forced between the bridge-of theistaple and the stapled material.

permit passage of lifting; jawyZ between. said prongs. As ;may be seen inq figure.'7,is-taplez legs 36 and-3! arepot, as ye end of the -primar An abutmentpin-l 3,5 secured to gripmember I serves to abut against link-=I2'at theyenct of he ritro'cker arm I lsim-ple grip-j .igure 1, iflrl iby setting the device .on the staplemmaterialw-and; simply 1 'hus; grmgfmember I and B0 ures 2 and 3) on motionless link I2, and the rela' As shown -;i,n,;-;F,'ig;ure-7; the space between prongs -24'-and 25"' issufflciently wide to ment of the staple legs in the material but it is insubstantial relative to the actual and complete removal movement. The actual withdrawal and unclinching of the staple occurs in the secondary or lifting movement to the position shown in Figures 8 and 9.

As previously stated, at the end of the primary or engaging movement, pin 35 on rocker arm I abuts link I2 and as additional downward pressure is applied on grip member I, both member I and link I2 are locked together (Figure 6) and pivot in unison around rivet pin I i secured to housing I5 in a clockwise direction to the positionof Figure 8. Lower half SI of spring 28 yields to permit the pivotal movement just described. Lifting jaw 2 is raised (Figure 8) pulling bridge 38 of staple 5 with it. Legs 36 and 3! of said staple are caused to straighten without injury to the stapled material because throughout the entire secondary or lifting movement, guard jaw 3 remains in contact with the stapled material I8 and legs 36 and 3'! are straightened or ironedout by being pulled past prongs 25 and 2-1.

From the description of the operation thus far, it should be apparent that during the primary or engaging movement, since lifting jaw 2 and guard jaw 3 are both forced under the staple bridge 38 simultaneously from opposite direction and with substantially equal forces, the staple will remain in fixed position relative to the stapled material. Thrusting only one jaw under the staple bridge may cause tearing of the stapled material if the strength of said material is inadequate in view of the force required to cause the jaw to enter beneath the staple bridge, thin paper being, for example, especially liable to injury.

The use of opposing jaws for engagement, together with the simple lifting action of the secondary movement obtains an effective easily-operated structure which avoids injury to the most delicate material.

It should be noted that rivet pin I3 is normally positioned substantially directly above staple 5 (Figure' 6) and-rivet pin I4 is positioned as close as practical to the stapled material, thus the movements of the'jaws in the primary movement and of the lifting jaw in the secondary movement are in the path of as fiat an are as is practicable, closely simulating straight-line motion.

Retaining member 6 is for the purpose of preventing single leg withdrawal, or one wherein only one leg is withdrawn, the other remaining clinched to the material. Such a withdrawal is not satisfactory and may result in tearing of the material.

cause single-leg withdrawal. a condition'is seen in Figure 10.

Retaining member 6 is spaced from the upper surface of lifting jaw just enough to permit easyentry of the bridge of the staple. In the event one leg only yields, the bridge will tend to become cocked in the space between the lifting jaw and the retaining member, as seen exaggerated in Figure 10. When this occurs, the bridge will be-' come gripped so that the wire of the staple cannot slip through the space or notch-like aper- 1 ,ture defined by the upper surface 58 (Fig. 10) of v nclinched; at the 1 ele s n m vem he relatively thin .-jaws havingbeen permitted to I enter beneath bridge .33 by a'slight, yielding and the lifting jaw and the lower surface 4| of the retaining member 5. The bent portion 42 of the spring in the staple. There may be a slight moveretaining member 6 which further will prevent In some instances, one staple leg is. more firmly clinched than the other which will The start of such.

assegmn passageof the wire therethrough. As seen in Figure 10, the-leg lilpi the staple:has remainedi clinched after the-leg id-has. become unclinched'. This will cause=the bridge 38 to become cocked in the restricted space between. the: retaining.

member 6' and the liftingjaw. zl'so thatthe staple. wirewill begripped thereby and .notxbe. pulled.

through. so: as to leave the stapleandpne: leg: inthe material, or to mutilate thesamez. In Fig ure l1, leg..431is.shown: ashavingbeen.unclinched. as the jaws are moved further apart, thestaple:

bridge-having been. gripped so that both legs have been withdrawn. The staple will in this manner be withdrawn uniformly from the material by the; gripping action of the retainingmember and lifting jaw when the single-leg withdrawal first.

being; allowed so that the staple bridgev enters" with ease. The variation in diameter of. staple wiresused for practical purposes is such: that a. height to accommodate the-largest will operate;

satisfactorily with most of the sizes now employed.

If the space is considerably greater than the diameter of the wire, a member placed on the lifting jaw will serve merely as a means to prevent the liberated staple from flying violently away from the removal jaw and not as a retaining member to grip the wire and revent the same from being drawn through the notch. The retaining member preferably should extend a substantial distance longitudinally of the bridge of the staple, such as seen, for example, in Figure 7. By use of the retaining member as described, thegripping effect is applied only when needed and upon freeing of the staple from the material, the gripping is no longer effective, thus allowing the staple to be easily freed from the device by a slight shake without the necessity for manually forcing the staple out.

The principles involved and device also may be used for pulling tacks and the like by the simple expedient of specifically shaping the jaws to suit the article to be removed.

It should be understood that various changes and modifications may be made from those specifically illustrated without departing from the spirit of my invention or the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A staple pulling device including a pair of jaws having tip portions movable to overlapping positions relative to each other, means to primarily move said both jaws relatively toward each other in overlapping relationship, both jaws moving under the bridge of a staple engaged in material, and means for thereafter secondarily moving one of said jaws relative to the other jaw in a direction differing from said primary movement to raise said staple and remove the same from the material in which said staple is engag-ed.

2. A staple pulling device including a pair of jaws, jaw operating means movable relative to each other and connected with said jaws to first move said jaws relatively toward each other under the bridge of a staple engaged in material, and means connected with said jaw operating means to thereafter move one only of said jaws substantially perpendicularly relative to said other-- jaw r and said material as:-said=1jaw: operat ing means. is: moved further following said pri-.-

mary movement to .remove said staple from. said." material;

3; A. stapleipulling device including a guard: jaw. andzxazli-fting-xj awrhavinga tipsa movable.-. into.

overlappin :relationship; anzoperatingmeansim said; jaws; means? connected; to said. operating: means to primarily move said jawsmelatively to:- ward; each other:under.-the bridge. ofa. staple, en:- gaged int material with.v insubstantial.movement of; said-:staple-.outof saidzmaterialas saidioperatr ing means.- is: operated, both .of said jaws being, under-saidibridgeand the tipsthereof being-in overlapped relation, and. a second means con-- nected' with i said. operating means for secondarily,-

moving.said liftin jaw away; from said guard jawfl inazdirectionr differing from, said primary. move-- ment of. said jaws; to raisesaid staple and remove the-samefromthe material, saidguard jaw being adapted to-remain adjacent said material.

4. A staple pulling device including apair ofjaws having tipsmovable into overlapping relae tionship, jaw operating means; movable relative to each other. toprimarily move. saidjaws relatively toward. each otherunder the bridge. of..a staple. engaged. in. materialv without. .removalto an substantial extent of said staple out of said material, both jaws moving under said staple, and means connected with said jaw operating means for secondarily moving one of said jaws away from the other jaw and the material as said jaw operating means are moved relative to each other after said primary movement, said other jaw remaining adjacent said material, the direction of said secondary movement being substantially at right angles to said primary movement to remove said staple from said material.

5. A staple pulling device including a pair of jaws having tips movable into overlapping rela-- tionship, operating means connected with said jaws and movable relative to each other to first move said jaws relatively toward each other and under the bridge of a staple engaged in material, the tips of said jaws moving past each other in overlapped relationship a greater distance than the thickness of the staple, means connected with said operating means and movable thereby for thereafter moving in a different direction than said first movement one of said jaws relative to the other one of the jaws to remove said staple from said material, and an engaging member on said last mentioned jaw for closely engaging the bridge of said staple to effect uniform withdrawal of both staple legs as said staple is removed.

6. A staple pulling device including a guard jaw and a lifting jaw for simultaneous insertion from opposite directions under the bridge of a staple engaged in material with their tips in overlapping relationship at least the thickness of the bridge of a staple to be removed, said jaws being first movable relatively toward each other, means for raising said lifting jaw relative to said guard jaw in a direction different than the insertion movement of said jaw to remove said staple from said material, and a retaining means positioned over the lifting jaw and spaced therefrom at least the thickness of a staple but limited to a confined space for gripping a bent portion of the staple, whereby said staple is withdrawn uniformly.

'7. A staple pulling device comprising a pair of staple pulling jaws, a pair of operating grips movable relative to each other, means connecting said staple pulling jaws with said grips, connecting 76 means between said grips for first moving said 7' jaws relatively toward each other under the bridge of a staple engaged in material, and means cooperating with said connecting means after said first movement of the jaws to cause continued movement of said grips in the same relative direction to move one of said jaws relative to the other in a diiferent direction than the first movement of said jaws for withdrawing said staple from said material.

8. A staple pulling device including a frame, a grip member movable relative to said frame, a link pivotally mounted on opposite ends thereof to said frame and grip member respectively, a guard jaw carried. by said frame, a lifting jaw carried by said grip, a, stop to limit pivoting movement of said grip on said link, a spring mounted between said frame and grip member and urging the same apart, said spring also being connected to said link and restraining rotation of said link until said stop has become operative, pivoting movement of said grip on said link moving said jaws relatively toward each other and pivoting movement of said link on said frame raising said lifting jaw relative to said guard jaw.

9. A staple pulling device including a, frame, a grip member movable relative to said frame, said frame and grip having an interconnecting pin and slot motion guiding means, a link pivotally mounted on opposite ends thereof to said frame and grip member respectively, a, guard jaw carried by said frame, a lifting jaw carried by said grip, a stop to limit pivoting movement of said grip on said link, pivoting movement of said grip on said link moving said jaws relatively toward each other under the bridge of a staple and pivoting movement thereafter of said link on said frame raising said lifting jaw relative to said guard jaw.

JOHN A. YERKES.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are -of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 456,479 Reid July 28, 1891 488,595 Zahringer Dec. 27, 1892 595,692 Brockson Dec. 21, 1897 1,166,419 Allen Jan. 4, 1916 1,948,096 Cavanagh Feb. 20, 1934 2,033,050 Pankonin Mar. 3, 1936 2,202,984 Drypolcher June 4, 1940

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US456479 *Dec 23, 1890Jul 21, 1891John Acushman
US488595 *Apr 25, 1892Dec 20, 1892 Nail-extractor
US595692 *Apr 16, 1897Dec 21, 1897 Horseshoe-extractor
US1166419 *Dec 16, 1914Jan 4, 1916Edward Thomas AllanStaple-puller.
US1948096 *Dec 18, 1931Feb 20, 1934Boston Wire Stitcher CoStaple extractor
US2033050 *Dec 12, 1932Mar 3, 1936Pankonin William GTool for removing staples
US2202984 *Mar 17, 1939Jun 4, 1940Abraham ObstfeldStaple remover
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2592570 *Aug 31, 1949Apr 15, 1952Robert HofstetterStaple extractor
US2638313 *Jun 30, 1950May 12, 1953Wilson Jones CoStaple extractor
US2662727 *Feb 17, 1949Dec 15, 1953Yerkes John AStaple remover
US2733893 *May 29, 1951Feb 7, 1956 Segal
US3166296 *Nov 15, 1961Jan 19, 1965Michel FournierApparatus for extracting metal staples
US5033718 *Jan 16, 1990Jul 23, 1991Jean GarrisonStaple removing apparatus
US5749564 *Sep 4, 1996May 12, 1998Malek; Shahin ShaneStaple removing device
US6105936 *Sep 4, 1997Aug 22, 2000Malek; Shahin S.Staple remover
US6244489 *Oct 7, 1999Jun 12, 2001Robert LaurieRetractable staple remover jaws utilizing stapler machine as lever handles
US6371349May 7, 2001Apr 16, 2002Robert S. LaurieRetractable staple remover jaws utilizing stapler machine as lever handles
US8083211Apr 22, 2009Dec 27, 2011Worktools, Inc.Staple remover
US8366076 *Nov 1, 2004Feb 5, 2013Anton Paul NessStaple remover
DE924267C *Feb 17, 1952Feb 28, 1955Speed Products CompanyVorrichtung zum Herausziehen einer Heftklammer
DE1195269B *Sep 20, 1961Jun 24, 1965Herbin Sa Ets JAuszieher fuer Heftklammern
WO1998009775A1 *Sep 4, 1997Mar 12, 1998Malek Shahin SImproved staple remover
Classifications
U.S. Classification254/28
International ClassificationB25C11/02, B25C11/00
Cooperative ClassificationB25C11/02
European ClassificationB25C11/02