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Publication numberUS2539292 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 23, 1951
Filing dateDec 16, 1947
Priority dateDec 16, 1947
Publication numberUS 2539292 A, US 2539292A, US-A-2539292, US2539292 A, US2539292A
InventorsJames H Anderson
Original AssigneeIngersoll Rand Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pressure booster
US 2539292 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 23, 1951 J, ANDERSON 2,539,292

PRESSURE BOOSTER Filed Dec. 16, 1947 NVENTO JA H. ANDER HIS ATTORNEY.

UNIT E D STATES PATENT OF P ICE REE S SURE BOOST-EH1 JamesHI Anderson, Easton, Pa, assignor tom? gersoll R'and Company, New York, N. Y.', a cr= poration ofNewdersey Application December 16, 19.47, ,SerialNo. 792,067;

This invention relates to. fluid compressors, and more particularly. to .anpressure booster the com-.- pressing elementrof which is actuated b'ypressure fluid. derived from, the same sourceas thatiin- .tendedtobe compressed toa higher value.

One objector the inventionis to enablethe Qpressurevalue, of afluidto be conveniently and expeditiously increased.,

' Anothervobject isto provide a light weight pressure. booster ofisimplifled andruggedfconstruction that may, be; operated andsmaintained witha minimumof expense.

Other objects will be in part obvious and in .part pointed out hereinafter.

In, the drawingsaccompanying this, specificationand ,in which similar. reference numerals referto similar parts,

Figure, 1 is. a, longitudinal elevation, partly broken away,v or" a pressure booster constructed inpaccordance withvthe practiceof the invention showing the parts in position tosubject' the piston to motiveufluidifordriving it on itspower stroke, 7

Figure 2 is -a similar view showing tthe piston at the end ofits powertstroke, and Figure stisa transverse-view taken through Figurez on theline 3i3.1

Referring, more particularly to the drawings, thepressure booster constructed in accordance with .the practice of the. invention andfdesigpated rzni comprisesaicylinder zlhavinga boreconsiste ingot", A an, enlarged portionand jareducedjportion hatuconst tute power and compression-chambers 2Z-.and.2.3.-, respectively.

The outer: ends, of the. power and" compression chambersvarec closed.1by heads 24and 25 having admission chambers. 26rand 2l, respectively, into which; fluidgis conveyed; from a suitable source of supply (not shown), by a conduit 28. Communication between; the chamber 2? and the compression chamber 2 3 is controlled by a springpressed'check valve ZQ-lyingin a platetfl interposed between the head 25 and theend of the cylinder 21, saidplatehaving an aperture 3| to accommodate the valve 29, and to afford com.- munieation-between the compression chamber 23 and the supply chamber 211 The-,plate 30" is furtherprovided withjaeport '32'for the discharge of the compressed fluid from the chamber 23, and said port is controlled by a spring-pressed valve 33 lying within a recess 34 in the head 25 through which the discharge fluid flows from the port 32 to a discharge conduit 35.

The admission of pressure fluid from the chamber 26 to the power chamber 22 is efiected hroughca. passage 3t in the beagle controlled by ra valve 31'. The .valve 31' isshoWn asub'eing of the poppet type. A seating surface 38"is provided therefor atthe juncture of the passage 36Twith the chamber 2'! andits stem 39'extends slidabl y through a guide member ieinthe, passages 33. The stem: hasafree runnin fitih the guide member 49 and,jwhen.at rest; the valve stands away from. the seating surface, 38" to normally maintain an, area otcommunication between ,the power chamberandr'the chamber 26., It is held thus-by a, spring 451 I attached at" one ,e-nd to" the guide member fiiland at its other end to a collar 42?securedtothefreeend' ofjthestem 39 by a pin 43.

The free, end of'the valve-stem 39 projects from thevrecess 36"into the path of a piston Mreciprocablein the power chamber, ZZ'so that when the piston 44 approaches the endof its suction stroke the end surface 45 thereof "will engage the end of the valve stem and move the valve fi'l'to a wide open position for admitting pressure fluid into the power chamber 22.

Pressure fluidis admitted into only-the outer 'end of the power chamber,.and' the piston is actuated; on its suction; stroke by the pressure fluid actingagainst the end'of the stem 46 of the chamberflis a ,free exhaust port '48. for the escape of such fl'uidto the atmosphere.

The passage is controlled by-"a valve 49 shown as being of the poppettype: The stem 50 thereof is slidably guided by ribs-5 l in' the passage 41; and thevalve--49- is normally held against its seat 52 by a spring 53 seating 'atoneend against the ribs 5;! andat' its other end against a col-lar 5'4Iatthe'free endof the valve-stem 55. The stem 50"project's' from the passage 4'! to abutthe" end wall ofithe power'chamber. 22 as'the piston moves through the endportionbf its compression stroke for'unseating' the, valve-49 to-comniunicate the active'endof the. power chamber with the exhaustport 43.

In the operation of the device, and with the conduit 28 in communication withthesource-of the pressure fluid intended to be compressed to a higher value, pressure fluid will flow through the aperture 3| into the compression chamber 23 and through the space between the valve 31 and its seat 38 and the passage 36 into the power chamber 22 to drive the piston 44 on its working 3 stroke. The compressed fluid in the compression chamber 23 will then be compressed to a higher value and discharged through the port 32, the recess 3d and the discharge conduit 35 to a point of storage or utilization.

Near the end of the compression stroke of the piston the valve stem 50 engages the inner end wall of the power chamber 22 and will be held stationary thereby. Thus, as the piston continues on its compression stroke the valve seat 52 will be withdrawn from the valve 49 and the fluid in the power chamber will flow through the passage 47, the inactive end of the power chamber 22 and the exhaust port 48 to the atmosphere.

Simultaneously with the drop in pressure within the power chamber 22 incident to the opening of the valve 49, the pressure fluid in the chamber 26 will shift the Valve 31 to its seat and cut-off the further admission of pressure fluid into the power chamber. thereafter into the compression chamber through the aperture 31 against the small end of the piston stem 46 will then again return the piston. When, during this stroke of the piston, the surface 45 engages the valve stem 39 the valve 3'5 will be unseated to admit a new charge of pressure fluid into the power chamber for again driving the piston on its working stroke.

In practice, the present invention has been found to be particularly suitable for use in instances where one or more of a number of pressure fluid actuated mechanisms require pressure of a value greater than other mechanisms of a system. In such case, the booster may be quickly connected to the supply line conveying the pressure intended to be boosted to a. higher value and to the mechanism requiring such pressure fluid and may be set in operation to perform its boosting function automatically as long as the booster remains in communication with the source of power supply.

I claim:

1. A pressure booster, comprising a casing having a bore to define a power chamber having opposed ends and a compression chamber of smaller diameter than the power chamber, a reciprocatory piston in the chambers, inlet and discharge passages for the compression chamber, check valves to control said passages, supply and exhaust passages for the powe chamber at opposed ends thereof, a valve to control the supply passage, a passage in the piston for the escape of exhaust fluid from the power chamber to the exhaust passage, and anexhaust valve in the piston to control the last-mentioned passage having a stem to abut the casing for opening said exhaust valve when the piston approaches the end of the compression stroke.

2. A pressure booster, comprising a casing having a bore to define a power chamber having opposed ends and a compression chamber of smaller diameter than the power chamber, a reciprocatory piston in the chambersflnlet and discharge passages in the casing for the compression chamber, check valves to control said passages, supply and exhaust passages in the casing for the power chamber at the opposed ends thereof, a passage in the piston for the escape of exhaust fluid The pressure fluid flowing from the power chamber to the exhaust port, a valve to control the last-mentioned passage and being unseated by the casing to permit the flow of exhaust fluid through the last-mentioned passage to the exhaust passage, and a valve to control the supply passage having a stem extending into the path of movement of the piston, and a surface on the piston to engage the stem to unseat the last-mentioned valve for admitting pressure fluid into the power chamber.

3. A pressure booster, comprising a casing having a bore to define a power chamber and a compression chamber of smaller diameter than the power chamber, a reciprocatory piston in the chambers, inlet and discharge passages in the casing for the compression chamber, check valves to control said passages, a supply passage in the casing to convey pressure fluid into one end of the power chamber, a free exhaust port in the casing at the other end Of the power chamber, a passage in the piston for the escape of exhaust fluid from the power chamber to the exhaust port, a spring-pressed valve to control the last-mentioned passage and being unseated by the casing to permit the flow of exhaust fluid through the last-mentioned passage to the exhaust port, a valve to control the supply passage having a pressure surface subjected to pressure fluid ror closing said last-mentioned valve, a surface on the piston to unseat the last-mentioned valve for admitting pressure fluid into the power chamber, and a spring for normally holding the valve in an unseated position.

4. A pressure booster, comprising a casing having a bore to define a power chamber and a compression chamber having a smaller diameter than the power chamber, a reciprocatory piston in the chambers, inlet and discharge passages in the casing for the compression chamber, check valves to control said passages, a supply passage in the casing to convey pressure fluid into one end of the power chamber, a free exhaust port in the casing at the other end of the power chamber, a passage in the piston for the escape of exhaust fluid from the power chamber to the exhaust port, a spring-pressed valve to control the last-mentioned passage and being unseated by the casing to permit the flow of exhaust fluid through the last-mentioned passage to the exhaust port, a valve axially displaced from the last-mentioned valve to control the supply passage having a pressure surface subjected to pressure fluid for closing said last-mentioned valve, a surface on the piston to unseat the last-mentioned valve for admitting pressure fluid into the power chamber, and a spring for normally holding the valve in an unseated position.

JAMES H. ANDERSON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 217,626 Lyman July 15, 1879 2,231,307 Wallace Feb. 11, 1941 2,279,364 Cadbury Apr. 14, 1942

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US217626 *May 12, 1879Jul 15, 1879 Improvement in automatic pumps
US2231307 *May 10, 1940Feb 11, 1941Cleveland Pneumatic Tool CoAir pump
US2279364 *Jul 24, 1940Apr 14, 1942E M B Co LtdCompressed air internsifier
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2733450 *Aug 27, 1952Feb 7, 1956 wallace
US3257485 *Feb 26, 1962Jun 21, 1966Phillips Petroleum CoMethod of and apparatus for supplying a high pressure
US3266422 *Dec 5, 1961Aug 16, 1966Matheisel Rudolph ARechargeable accumulator system for auxiliary power supply
US3357450 *Feb 16, 1965Dec 12, 1967Spillman Gerald FPositive control tire inflation system
US3362618 *Oct 18, 1965Jan 9, 1968Grigorievich Fortinov LeonidDevice for increasing pressure of working medium
US3591317 *Jul 19, 1968Jul 6, 1971Glenn D JamesMethod and apparatus for pressurizing steam
US3632230 *Oct 16, 1970Jan 4, 1972Aisin SeikiHydraulic intensifier
US3720484 *Mar 2, 1971Mar 13, 1973Kirshsieper WHydraulic pressure transformer
US4601642 *Oct 1, 1985Jul 22, 1986The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Air ForceHydraulic pressure intensifier
US4733568 *Feb 18, 1986Mar 29, 1988Robert KoopmansBorehole dilatometer intensifier
US4760741 *Feb 3, 1986Aug 2, 1988Robert KoopmansBorehole dilatometer with intensifier
US5055008 *Jan 29, 1990Oct 8, 1991Chemilizer Products, Inc.Proportionating pump for liquid additive metering
US5065824 *Dec 28, 1989Nov 19, 1991Esco CorporationHydraulically powered repetitive impact hammer
US5234322 *Dec 24, 1992Aug 10, 1993Chemilizer Products, Inc.Proportioning pump improvements
US5484269 *Apr 24, 1995Jan 16, 1996Moog Inc.Fluid intensifier
US6663360 *Jun 25, 2002Dec 16, 2003James A. KyerFluid injection pump with internal air actuator valve
US20110176940 *Jul 6, 2009Jul 21, 2011Ellis Shawn DHigh pressure intensifier system
WO1991009709A1 *Dec 20, 1990Jun 29, 1991Esco CorpHydraulically powered repetitive impact hammer
WO2013132150A1 *Feb 26, 2013Sep 12, 2013Wärtsilä Finland OyHydraulic actuator
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/225, 91/224, 91/229
International ClassificationF01B17/04, E05B65/38, F01L21/04, F04B35/00
Cooperative ClassificationF01B17/04, E05B77/50, F04B35/008, F01L21/04
European ClassificationF01L21/04, F01B17/04, E05B77/50, F04B35/00T