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Publication numberUS2539391 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 30, 1951
Filing dateJun 17, 1948
Publication numberUS 2539391 A, US 2539391A, US-A-2539391, US2539391 A, US2539391A
InventorsGrove D. Alvord
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heavy-duty silent vibrator
US 2539391 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 30, 1951 l AG, D, ALVQRD v 2,539,391

HEAVY-DUTY SILENT VIBRATR Filed June 17, 194e 2 sheets-sheet 1 INV ENTOR.

Jan. 30, 1951 G. D. ALVORD 2,539,391

HEAVY-DUTY SILENT VIBRATOR Filed June 17, 1948 i 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Jan. 30, T951 HEAVY-DUTY SILENT VIBRATOR Grove D. Alvord, Indiana, Pa., assignor to Syntron Company, Homer City, Pa., a corporation of Delaware Application .lune 1.7, 1948, Serial No. 33,487`

6 Claims.

This invention relates generally to electromagnetic vibratory or reciprocating motors and more particularly to a vibratory motor having anarmature member and an electromagnetic field member supported in operative spaced relation to provide a magnetic coupling therebetween and when the electromagnetic field member is energized with a pulsating current the armature is caused to vibrate. vibratory motors of this character are attached to various objects such as tables, screensJ shoots, spouts, bins, hoppers and the like through which bull; material, powdered or nely divided materials are fed and are apt to clog or produce an uneven flow unless aided by a vibratory means of this character.

This invention represents an improvement of the vibratory motor such as disclosed in United States Letters Patent 2,310,185 and 2,380,622.

The vibratory motor is constructed of a vibratory member and a base and the latter is readily attachable to the object to be Vbrated. The base is preferably constructed to carry an electromagnetic field member and the vibratory member is constructed to carry the armature member. The vibratory member is resiliently supported on the base and the weight of the armature together with the weight of the load carried by the vibratory member is selected :with the springs, or resilient elements supporting the vibratory member, to provide a mechanically tuned system, the frequency of Vibration or oscillation of which is preferably a few cycles less than the frequency of the current impulses employed to energize the electromagnetic field member.

The electromagnetic field member may be energized directly from a sixty cycle alternating current source which will provide 7,200 vibrations per minute. If a permanent magnet armature is employed the vibratory motor may be constructed to vibrate at a rate of 3,600 vibrations per minute. This same vibratory'frequency may also be obtained by means of a laminated armature and a rectifier energized from an alternating current source.

The vibratory member or the vibratory motor of this character may be made to strike some portion of the base. This provides a direct mechanical impact which functions to vibrate the object. Such a metal-to-metal contact creates a very loud noise and is very hard on the nerves of individuals who are required to work around and about vibratory motors of this character.

The principal object of this invention is the provision of a resilient anvil independent of the resilient support of the vibratory member andil which is arranged to receive the impact of the vibratory member and to cause it to silently transmit the vibrations throughout thel base to the object.

Another object is the provision of a rubber anvil for the impact of the vibratory member of av vibratory motor for the purpose of increasing the amplitude and vibration of the motor. Y

Another object is the provision of a rubber anvil in a vibratory motor that maybe adjusted to vary the characteristics. of the-vibration of the motor.

Other objects and advantages appear herein-- after in the following description and claims;

The accompanying drawingsshow, for the purpose of exemplication, without limiting the in,- vention or claims thereto, certain practical embodiments of the inventiony wherein:

Fig. 1 is an end view of an `electromagnetic vibratory motor;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the vibratory motor shown in Fig. 1;

Fig, 3 is an endl elevation of a modified form `of vibratory motors;

Fig. 4 is a side elevation in Fig. 3; and

Fig. 5 is a .detail elevation `of a modified form of resilient anvil or a vibratory motor.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2 the vibratory motor is mounted on the hollow box type Abase member of the structure shown I which is open at its ends vas indicated at 2 and.

has an intermediate window as indicated at 3. The lower part of the base is provided with suitable holes 4 for bolting the base to the object to be vibrated.

The top deck 5 of the base provides an anvil at either end thereof and the center is arranged te support the electromagnetic field coil vE which is disposed about the center core l; of -the E-shaped laminated magnetic Acore Vmember -8 clamped within the base member. Eachof the three vpoles extend upwardly above the deck 5. The three pole faces of the eld core member are held in spaced relation to the armature 9 which is supported in the hollow vibratory mem-ber Ilil resiliently supported relative to the base.

In the structure shown in Figs. 1 and 2 the vibratory member I0 has a recess El for receiving in spaced relation the encased electromagnetic coil 6. The ends l2 of the vibratory member are hooded or inverted U-shaped in crosssection and are provided with outwardly extend ing wings I3 that are reinforced by the ribs hl, with the body of the vibratory member. Eachvof accessi th wings I3 overlie the anvil sections at the ends of the base member. The undersurface of each of the wings lies in a common plane and is provided with a hole for receiving the spring holder bolt I5.

The anvils on each end of the base member are provided with a post I6 which is a stud threaded at both ends. Each of the Studs I5 pass through an opening in the anvil and the depending boss I'I and are engaged at their lower ends by the nuts I8. Immediately above the anvil the post I6 is provided with a spacer block 2 on top o`f which is placed a series of leaf springs 2! which have holes in their middle portion to slip over the post I6 and are engaged at the top by the center spring clamp 22. Shims may be used on both sides of the leaf springs to properly adjust them vertically on the posts I6.

Immediately above the clamp 22 the stud I5 is provided with a nut 23 on which rests a washer 24 Yfor the purpose of receiving the helical spring 25. The stud IES then passes through an opening in the ends I2 of the vibratory member and is arranged to receive the upper spring member 2S, the washer 2'I, the nut and lock nut 28 and 2Q. Thus, the coil springs 25 and 25 resiliently support the vibratory member and the armature assembly relative to the base. These springs are under compression a sufficient degree for the purpose of tuning a mechanical vibratory system of the vibratory motor.

The leaf springs 2i have open-ended slots at their outer ends for receiving the bolts I5. The undersurfaces of the wings i3 are arranged to receive the spacers 3i) which maintain the leaf springs 2i in spaced relation with the vibratory member. On the underside of the leaf springs 2l the bolts I5 support the spring clamp assembly or leaf spring holders 3l which consists of a rubber cushion 32 between the metal clip 33 and the washer 34 heldin clamped relation by the nut 35 compressing the lock washer on the bolt I5.

Inwardly of the resilient leaf spring holders 3| the base I is provided with a rubber anvil 35 which is vulcanized to the top surface of a plate 31 bolted to the base by means of the bolts 38. These rubber anvils may be adjustably positioned intermediate the stud I5 and the resilient holders 3iv and are designed to engage the undersurface of the leaf springs 2l. These rubber anvils provide a vibration dampener of the vibratory member I0 which receives the impact of the movement of the latter and prevents any metallic impact between the moving parts and the base, thereby eliminating noise of impact in this vibratory motor, These resilient anvils also have an additional function of causing a quicker return of the moving vibratory member consequently inducing a greater amplitude for a given current input and thus a greater vibration effect is vtransmitted to the base.

It is preferable to operate this vibratory motor from 1,200 to 3,600 vibrations per minute. 3,600 vibrations per minute may be obtained by the use of a permanent magnet armature or by the use of a rectier in series with the electromagnetic field current which rectifier may be of the tube y'type or single leg dry disk type. From a twenty-five cycle circuit the vibratory member would be operated directly tc produce 3,000 vibrations per minute, although 15,000 vibrations per minute may be obtained by the use of a half wave rectifier or a permanent magnet armature.

In the structures shown in Figs. 3 and 4 the studs I6 have been replaced by the bolts 40 and are arranged to clamp the middles of the leaf springs 2I between the spacers 20 and 22. Shims are employed between the spacers and the leaf springs 2i for the purpose of properly locating the springs relative to the base I of the vibratory member I0.

In the vibratory member I0 of the structure shown in Figs. 3 and 4 the end sections and helical springs have been eliminated and are required to be in the same plane as the intermediate portion of the casing as indicated at 42 for the purpose of receiving the weights 43 which may extend the full length of the casing and which may vary in thickness. The weights 43 may be added to or eliminated from the Weight of the vibratory member I0 for the purpose of obtaining a desired magnitude and natural frequency. It is of course necessary to provide the proper number of leaf springs 2I corresponding to the load due to the weights 43 in tuning the vibratory member.

In the structure shown in Fig. 5 the resilient spring holders 3l have been replaced by the helical spring holders 5a and the resilient anvil 36 has been replaced by the helical spring anvil 5I. In order to keep down the noise it is preferable to employ a rubber cushion 52 on the top of the helical spring anvil 5I.

By employing helical springs or rubber of different degrees of softness one is enabled to produce an anvil that has a considerable effect on the characteristics of the vibrations of this vibratory motor. One is also enabled to change ,l the characteristics by varying the position of the resilient anvils relative to the stud I6 or the bolt 40.

I claim:

1. A vibrator comprising a base constructed to be mounted for vibration, a vibratory motor having an armature member and an electromagnetic field member supported in operative spaced relation to provide a magnetic coupling therebetween, means securing one of said members f. to the base, spring holders carried by the other member, leaf springs secured at their middles to the base and having their ends mounted in said holders, and a pair of resilient members mounted in spaced relation on each end of one of said members to receive and transmit the full impact of the vibratory force to the base.

2. A Vibrator comprising a base constructed to be mounted for vibration, a vibratory motor having an armature member and an electromagnetic field member supported in operative spaced relation to provide a magnetic coupling therebetween, means securing one of said members to the base, a post supported at each end of the base, spring holders carried by the other member, a set of leaf springs secured at their middles to each post and having their ends mounted in said holders, and a pair of resilient members Iat each end of one of said members and spaced from said posts to receive the full impact of vibratory force from the leaf springs and transmit the same to the base.

3. A vibrator comprising a base member constructed to be mounted for vibration and a movable member, an electromagnetic field attached to the base member and an armature attached to the movable member, resilient means supporting the movable member relative to the base member to place the armature in operative spaced relation with the electromagnetic field,

resilient members on each end of the vibrator to receive and transmit the full impact of the vibratory force to the base, a pocket in said movable member, load weights in said pocket which aid in determining the natural period of vibration of said movable member and clamp means to lock said Weights in said pocket.

4. A vibrator comprising a base member constructed to be mounted for vibration and a movable member, an electromagnetic eld attached to the base member and an armature attached to the movable member, an anvil at each end of the base, a post intermediate the ends of each anvil, oppositely disposed resilient spring holders carried by the movable member in alignment with each post, a set of leaf springs secured at their middles to each post and having their ends mounted in each holder, and a resilient member mounted on each anvil on each side of each of said posts and spaced therefrom for engagement by said leaf springs and for receiving the full impact of the vibratory force and transmitting the same through the base to the object to be vibrated.

5. A vibrator comprising a base member constructed to be mounted for vibration and a movable member, an electromagnetic eld attached to the base member and an armature attached to the movable member, an anvil at each end of the base, a post intermediate the ends of each anvil, each post extending through an adjacent end of the movable member, opposed springs carried by each post and engaging the movable member, oppositely disposed resilient spring holders carried by the movable member in alignment with each post, a set of leaf springs secured at their middles to each post and having their ends mounted in each holder, and a resilient member mounted on the anvil on each side of each of said posts and spaced therefrom for engagement by said leaf springs and for receiving the full impact of the vibratory force and transmitting the same through the base to the object to be vibrated.

6. A vibrator comprising a base member constructed to be mounted for vibration and a movable member, an electromagnetic eld attached to the base member and an armature attached to the movable member, a post at each end of the base member, a seat on said movable member on each side of each post, a resilient spring holder fastened to each seat, a set of leaf springs secured at their middles to each post and having their ends located between their respective seats and holders, a resilient member mounted on the base adjacent each seat and engaging said leaf springs on each side of said posts and spaced therefrom, said seats overlying each pad and extending therebeyond toward said posts said spaced resilient members receiving and transmitting the full impact of the vibratory force to the base.

GRO-VE D. ALVORD.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date Re. 19,817 Wurzbach Jan. 7, 1936 1,093,301 Vande Apr. 14, 1914 2,310,185 Weyandt Feb. 2, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1093301 *Jun 16, 1913Apr 14, 1914Gerard VandeVibrator.
US2310185 *Dec 17, 1940Feb 2, 1943Weyandt Carl SReciprocatory motor and method of control thereof
USRE19817 *Jul 1, 1932Jan 7, 1936 Electromagnetic vibrating
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2694156 *Jan 9, 1951Nov 9, 1954Syntron CoTuning of vibratory systems
US2895064 *Dec 5, 1955Jul 14, 1959Eriez Mfg CompanyVibratory motor
US2895274 *Dec 28, 1953Jul 21, 1959Fmc CorpMachine for handling eggs
US3345525 *Apr 5, 1965Oct 3, 1967 Adjustable electric magnetic vibrator
US4117381 *Aug 24, 1977Sep 26, 1978Stanley TruxellVibrator
US4701647 *Oct 20, 1986Oct 20, 1987Fmc CorporationElectromagnetic vibratory exciter
US7210843 *Oct 19, 2006May 1, 2007Union Scientific CorporationMultidirectional mixing of fluid samples
US8016218Mar 16, 2011Sep 13, 2011Mitchell FriedmanLinear specimen shaker
Classifications
U.S. Classification310/29
Cooperative ClassificationH02K33/04