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Publication numberUS2539696 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 30, 1951
Filing dateJun 25, 1949
Publication numberUS 2539696 A, US 2539696A, US-A-2539696, US2539696 A, US2539696A
InventorsWillard L. Morrison
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for
US 2539696 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. L. MORRISON DEVICE FOR EVAPORATING DISINFECTANTS Filed June 25, 1949 fnvenlor will rd Mor'fison Z7 iiig Patented Jan. 30, 1951 DEVECE FOR EVAPORATING DISINFECTANTS Willard L. Morrison, Lake Forest, Ill.

Application June 25, 1949, Serial No. 101,453

2 Claims. 1

My invention relates to an improvement in the method of purifying the air in a room and has for one object to provide a means of evaporating disinfectants.

Another object is to provide a simple means of producing evaporation.

Another object is to provide a means of evaporating disinfectants that can be attached to any convenient electric light bulb and screwed into a socket supplied with electric current.

Other objects will appear from time to time in the course of the specification and claims.

I illustrate my invention more or less diagrammatically in the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a section through porous ceramic discs that are shown around the neck of an electric light bulb;

Figure 2 is a section through a variant shape of porous ceramic disc shown around the neck of an electric light bulb.

Like parts are indicated by like symbols throughout the specification and drawings.

Triethylene glycol is a widely-used means of disinfecting a room or removing odors from a room. There are various means of dispersing the triethylene glycol into the air but my invention provides a simpler method than any heretofore used.

I utilize the heat from an electric light bulb to cause a hastening of the evaporation of the triethylene glycol and the like.

There are various ways that the triethylene glycol can be handled. In Figures 1 and 2, I use porous ceramic shapes I and 2 which fit around the neck of an electric light bulb 3. To space the porous ceramic discs I awa from the bulb 3, there are small tabs 4. These tabs 4 hold the porous ceramic discs away from the bulb 3, so as to allow the air space between the bulb and the disc. This air space becomes warm and by convection transmits the heat from the bulb 3 to the porous ceramic disc l. The disc I is saturated with triethylene glycol and as the heat is transmitted to it, the triethylene glycol evaporates, thus causing the air in the room to contain triethylene glycol in suspension.

In Figures 1 and 2, where I use a porous ceramic disc, the discs are previously packed in a container filled with triethylene glycol so that, when a disc is removed from its container, it is saturated with the liquid. The container is not illustrated, as it forms no part of my invention.

The use and operation of my invention are as follows:

By diffusing triethylene glycol throughout a room, the air can be purified and any odors removed. My invention makes it possible to do this easily in any room where there is an electric light bulb. These discs or containers can be slipped around the neck of an electric light bulb and then the bulb is screwed into a socket and turned on. In a very short time, the bulb becomes quite warm and the heat from it is transmitted to the containers or discs. As the triethylene glycol in the containers or saturated in the discs becomes heated, it hastens the evaporation into the room. The triethylene glycol suspended in the air disinfects the air and also removes odors in the air.

I claim:

1. In combination, an electric light bulb, a plurality of parallel porous liquid absorbing diffuser plates, non-porous spacing means adapted to position said plates about the neck of the light bulb and maintain them out of contact with the bulb,

means for spacing the plates and holding them in parallelism with the plates side by sid and ly- I ing in planes generally perpendicular to the axis of the light bulb.

2. In combination, an electric light bulb, a plurality of parallel porous liquid absorbing difiuser plates, non-porous spacing means adapted to position said plates about the neck of the light bulb and maintain them out of contact with the bulb, means for spacing the plates and holding them in parallelism with the plates side by side and lying in planes generally perpendicular to the axis of the light bulb, the spacing means comprising a porous liquid absorbent cylinder integral with the plates and terminating in a downwardl extending, outwardly expanded skirt inclined with respect to the plates.

WILLARD L. MORRISON.

REFERENCES C ITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,403,548 Gudeman Jan. 17, 1922 1,421,633 Weidlich et a1. July 4, 1922 1,864,980 Curran June 28, 1932 2,207,889 Kingman July 16, 1940 2,472,011 Graham May 31, 1949 2,472,992 Szekely June 14, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 592,922 France Aug. 12, 1925

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1403548 *Sep 10, 1920Jan 17, 1922Gudeman LeoLamp vaporizer
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US1864980 *Sep 6, 1930Jun 28, 1932 Vapobizeb
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US2472011 *Jun 8, 1946May 31, 1949Gen Motors CorpAir treating apparatus
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FR592922A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2692327 *Dec 17, 1952Oct 19, 1954Jr Harry AvriganVaporizer
US2741812 *Feb 15, 1954Apr 17, 1956Tellier AndrePerfume dispenser
US3930796 *Sep 13, 1973Jan 6, 1976Universal Oil Products CompanyCatalytic fume control device
US4074111 *Jan 27, 1977Feb 14, 1978Hunter William GeorgeVaporizing attachment for light bulbs
US4579717 *Jun 4, 1984Apr 1, 1986Joseph GyulayPorous ceramic ring resting on lamp bulb; contains fragrant oil
US4627963 *Feb 29, 1984Dec 9, 1986Lad Technology, Inc.Shaped diatomaceous earth
US4647428 *Mar 28, 1986Mar 3, 1987Gyulay Joseph MAir freshener method
US4849181 *Nov 27, 1985Jul 18, 1989Lad TechnologyHeat activated dispenser for vaporizable materials
US4965490 *Jan 9, 1989Oct 23, 1990Gte Products CorporationScent-generating lamp using mating parts
US5840246 *Aug 6, 1996Nov 24, 1998Reckitt & Colman Inc.Oil lamp with fragrance emanator
US5908231 *Apr 3, 1998Jun 1, 1999Huff Industries, Inc.Light bulb fragrance dispenser
US6035098 *Jul 20, 1999Mar 7, 2000Osram Sylvania Inc.Scent lamp
US7083162 *Sep 2, 2003Aug 1, 2006The Dial CorporationIntermediary device
WO1985003877A1 *Feb 27, 1985Sep 12, 1985Economic Development CorpHeat activated dispenser
Classifications
U.S. Classification422/125, 422/305
Cooperative ClassificationA61L9/03