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Publication numberUS2541499 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 13, 1951
Filing dateJul 21, 1948
Priority dateJul 21, 1948
Publication numberUS 2541499 A, US 2541499A, US-A-2541499, US2541499 A, US2541499A
InventorsCarney Cornelius A
Original AssigneeCarney Cornelius A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Composite yarn, fabric made therefrom, and method of making the same
US 2541499 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 13, 1951 c. A CARNEY 2,541,499 COMPOSITE YARN, FABRIC MADE THEREFRQM, AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed July 21, 1948 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. CORNELIUS A. CARNEY ATTORNEY.

Feb. 13, 1951 c. A. CARNEY 2,541,499 I COMPOSITE YARN, FABRIC MADE THEREFROM, I

AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed July 21, 1948 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. CORNELIUS ACARNEY ATTORNEY.

Patented Feb. 13, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE COMPOSITE YARN, FABRIC MADE THERE- FROM, AND METHOD OFMAKING THE SAME 15 Claims.

This invention relates to a novel form of composite yarn, a fabric made therefrom, the method of makin the composite yarn, and the method of makin the fabric therefrom.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a form of yarn by means of which persons of relatively little skill may readily knit the same, preferably by crocheting, into a fabric which may, if desired, and preferably will have a pile formation on the face thereof, and in which the pile may be either cut or uncut loops, or various combinations of cutand uncut loops, or which may have the face thereof made up of various other novel strand structures.

A further object of the invention is to provide a composite yarn of the character aforesaid which may be readily and inexpensively made on an ordinary warp knitting machine, and which may be made in various forms according to the character of the fabric to be ultimately made.

While the invention is primarily directed to the production of a novel form of yarn by means of which persons of relatively little skill can knit the same by hand operation into the desired fabric, it should, however be noted that various machines may be devised for the purpose of automatically knitting the yarn into the desired fabrics by machine operations.

The nature and characteristic features of the invention will be more readily understood from the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings forming part hereof, in which:

Figure 1 is an elevational view, enlarged, and to a certain extent diagrammatic, illustrating a simple form of composite yarn, and a method of making the same, each embodying the main features of the present invention, the yarn in this instance being of a form for the production of fabrics having pile formed by uncut loops in the face thereof;

Fig. 2 is a similar view illustrating another form of composite yarn, and a method of makin the same, for producin a fabric having all cut pile in the face thereof;

Fig. 3 is a similar view illustrating another form of yarn, and a method of making the same, the use of which will cause the fabric to be ultimately produced to have cut and uncut pile loops in the face thereof;

Fig. 4 is a view illustrating the manner of knitting the composite yarn into the foundation chain or first course of a fabric by means of a crochet hook, the composite yarn there employed being of the type shown in Fig. 3; and

Fig. 5 is a similar view showing the formation of the fabric at a later stage.

It should, of course, be understood that the description and drawings herein are illustrative merely, and that various modifications and changes may be made in the construction, arrangement, and manipulation of the composite yarns contemplated by the present invention, as well as the fabrics made therefrom.

Referring now more particularly to Fig. 1 of the drawings, the basis of the various forms of the composite yarn in each instance comprises a strand l0 knitted on a single needle of a warp knitter, formin the usual chain stitch made by a warp knitter needle. It will, of course, be understood that the strand IU may be a single strand, or the same may comprise a plurality of strands arranged either side by side or twisted about each other. 7

Into a bight of the chain stitch formation, upon each manipulation of the needle, other strands II and [2 are fed back and forth crosswise to provide on each side of the median line provided by the chain a plurality of loops, the loops I 3 on one side being preferably made of cotton or other relatively inexpensive fiber, and the loops I 4 on the other side being made of more expensive fiber, such as Wool, although in some instances, for example, if the fabric is to be all cotton, or other fiber, then the strands for forming the knitting loops l3 on one side and the pile forming loops I4 on the other side may both be made of such material.

The tension of the basic chain strand I0 is such as to effectively bind and secure the inner portions of the strands H and I2 which form the knitting loops I 3 on the one side and the pile forming loops I4 on the other side of the binder chain.

The composite yarn illustrated in Fig. 2 of the drawings is preferably made by simultaneously knitting two of the binder strands l0 into separate chains, separated a certain distance from each other. A series of knitting loops l3 are provided on one side of each of the binder chains l0 and the inner portions of the knitting loop strands II are bound in successive bights of the binder chains, the same as is done in connection with the yarn shown in Fig. 1 of the drawings.

However, in the formation of the composite yarn shown in Fig. 2, the pile-forming strands l2 are carried back and forth by the yarn cartriers so that the inner portions of the sameare the face of the finished fabric, and will cause the same to have a smooth velvety surface.

In Fig. 3 of the drawings, there is illustrated another form of composite. yarn, and a method of making the same, in which the pile-forming strands will be alternately cut and uncut. In this instance, after each alternate pair of loops of the pile-forming strand 12 have been: bound in the binder strand chain, the pile-forming strands l2 on each side will be carried across from one chain to the other, and then bound into the binder chain-upon the next manipulation of the needles which form the binder chain 10.

During the manipulation of the yarn carriers of the warp knitter for the next two successive manipulations of the binder chain needles, the pile-forming warp 12 on each side will not be carried across, but will be returned without crossing the center line between the two binder chains.

In the formation of the yarn as shown in Fig. 3 of the drawings, the strand I l forming knitting loops I3 will be bound in the same manner as in the preceding forms.

However, in the formation of the composite yarn, as shown in Fig. 3 of the drawings, the strands l2 which cross over from one chain to the other will be subsequently cut apart by suitable cutting mechanism resulting in the formation of two composite yarns, each having cut pile l 4 and uncut pile l so that the face of the completed cloth will contain both out and uncut pile, resulting in a novel and pleasing effect in the completed fabric.

It will readily be understood that various other styles of composite yarn may be produced, for obtaining different eifects in the completed cloth by mere changes in the manipulation of the yarn carriers which control the delivery of the strands which are to constitute the face of the finished fabric, but in each instance the characteristic feature of the composite yarn will be the provision, in addition to the face forming strand which is bound in successive bights of the binder chain, of the uniformly sized and spaced knitting loops which are likewise bound in successive bights. of? the chain formed by the binder strand.

The manner of use of the various forms of composite yarns for making the finished fabric therefrom is substantially the same in each instance. The first step in the formation of the fabric is illustrated in Fig. 4 of the drawing and will be readily understood by those familiar with the art of hand. knitting, and comprises the formation of a basic chain by the manipulation of the hooked endv of a crochet hook 55 through the successive knitting loops !3 of the composite. yarns in. precisely the same manner in which an ordinary single strand yarn is knitted into a basic chain by an ordinary crochet hook.

The principal difierence between the use of the composite yarn of the present invention and ordinary knitting is that in use of the new composite yarn the loops iii are of a predetermined size, there is no necessity on the part of the knitter to maintain a uniform tension on the yarn for the purpose of insuring regularity of the-knitting, as the size of the knitted stitch is determined by the size of the loops l3 which have been previously made on the warp knitting machine.

After the basic chain of the fabric is first formed by successively pulling the loops through each other, as illustrated in Fig. 4, the operation continues in a manner similar to that of ordinary knitting.

In Fig. 5 of the drawing there is shown a portion of the fabric in which the knitting has progressed showing how the successive loops of the composite yarn are pulled through the preceding loops, as well as the strand of a chain in the preceding course.

It will be readily understood by those familiar with the art of hand knitting that the composite yarn. of the type hereby suggested may be made by means of ordinary hand-knitting needles, and in the same manner as ordinary knitting i done by such implements, and it will be also understood that the composite yarn of the present invention may be used for knitting on specially devised knitting machines, although the same is primarily intended and will find its greater usefulness in connection with hand-knitting, and particularly crocheting.

It will also be understood by those familiar with the art ofhand knitting that fabrics of any desired size may be readily made by first knitting the same in smaller units and'thereafter securing the edges of. said units to each other by interknitting the same with a plain yarn.

Furthermore, the yarn of the present invention may be knitted into various shapes by adding and dropping stitches in a manner similar to that done when knitting with plain yarns.

I claim:

1. A composite yarn to be used for knitting into a fabric, said yarn comprising a binder chain, a knitting strand, and a face forming strand, the knitting strand being of sinuous form having inner portions bound into bights of the binder chain and outer portions providing a series of loops of predetermined size adapted to be knitted into a fabric to form the ground cloth thereof, and the face forming strand having inner portions bound into bights of the binder chain and having outer portions constituting cut pile for forming the face of the fabric.

2. A composite yarn to be used for knitting into a; fabric, said; yarn comprising a binder chain, a knitting strand and a face forming strand, the knitting strand being of sinuous form having inner portions bound into bights of the binder chain. and outer portions providing a series of loops of predetermined size adapted to be knitted into a fabric to form the ground cloth thereof, and the face forming strand having inner portions bound into bights of the binder chain and having outerportions constituting cut and uncut pile for forming the, face of the fabric.

3. A fabric made of a knitted composite yarn comprising a binder chain, a knitting strand, and; a face formin strand, portions of each of said strands being bound into bights of the binder chain, and said yarn having, on at least one side of the binder chain, a series of loops of predetermined' size, and on at least one side of the binder chain, a plurality of face forming portions, the knitting loops being interknitted to form the ground cloth of the fabric, and the fabric having on one side of the ground cloth a face made of portions of the face forming strand.

4. A fabric made of a knitted composite yarn comprising a binder chain, a knitting strand, and

a face forming strand, portions of each of said strands being bound into bights of the binder chain, and said yarn having, on at least one side of the binder chain, a series of loops of predetermined size, and on at least one side of the binder chain, a plurality of face forming portions, the knitting loops being interknitted to form the ground cloth of the fabric, and the fabric having on one side of the ground cloth a cut pile face made of portions of the face forming strand.

5. A fabric made of a knitted composite yarn comprising a binder chain, a knitting strand, and a face forming strand, portions of each of said strands being bound into bights of the binder chain, and said yarn having, on at least one side of the binder chain, a series of loops of predetermined size, and on at least one side of the binder chain, a plurality of face forming portions, the knitting loops being interknitted to form the ground cloth of the fabric, and the fabric having on one side of the ground cloth a pile face made of portions of the face forming strand.

6. A fabric made of a knitted composite yarn comprising a binder chain, a knitting strand, and a face forming strand, portions of each of said strands being bound into bights of the binder chain, and said yarn having, on at least one side of the binder chain, a series of loops of predetermined size, and on at least one side of the binder chain, a plurality of face forming portions, the knitting loops being interknitted to form the ground cloth of the fabric, and the fabric having on one side of the ground cloth a cut and uncut pile face made of portions of the face forming strand.

7. The method of making a composite yarn to be used for knitting a fabric comprising simultaneously knitting at least two strands into separate binder chains, simultaneously feeding a knitting strand transversely to each of the binder chains, and binding portions of the same into bights of the respective binder chains, thereby to provide, on at least one side of each binder chain, a series of spaced loops of predetermined size adapted to be interknitted to form the ground cloth of the fabric, simultaneously feeding a plurality of face strands transversely and. binding portions of the same into bights of the binder chain, said face strands extending from one binder chain to the other, and cutting the said face strands between the binder chains to provide, on at least one side of each of the binder chains, a plurality of portions toform a cut pile in the face of the fabric.

8. The method of making a composite yarn to be used for knitting a fabric comprising simultaneously knitting at least two strands into sepa-- rate binder chains, simultaneously feeding a knitting strand transversely to each of the binder chains, and binding portions of the same into bights of the respective binder chains, thereby to provide, on at least one side of each binder chain, a series of spaced loops of predetermined size adapted to be interknitted to form the ground cloth of the fabric, simultaneously feeding a plurality of face strands transversely and binding portions of the same into bights of the binder chain, said face strands having portions extending from one binder chain to the other, and other portions forming loops extending from the binder chain, cutting the said face strands between the binder chains to provide, on at least one side of each of the binder chains, a plurality of portions to form cut and uncut pile in the face of the fabric.

9. The method of making a fabric which consists in first forming a composite yarn by knitting a strand into a binder chain and simultaneously feeding a knitting strand and a face strand transversely, binding portions of each of said strands into bights of the binder chain to provide on at least one side of the binder chain a series of loops of predetermined size, and to provide on at least one side of the binder chain a plurality of face forming portions, and then interknitting the knitting loops to form the ground cloth of the fabric and to provide on the one side of the ground cloth a face made of portions of the face forming strand.

10. The method of making a fabric which consists in first forming composite yarn by knitting at least two strands into separate binder chains,

simultaneously feeding a, knitting strand transversely to each of the binder chains and binding portions of the same into bights of the respec-,

tive binder chains, thereby to provide, on at least one side of each binder chain, a series of spaced knitting loops of predetermined size, simultaneously feeding a plurality of face forming strand and binding portions of the same into bights of the binder chain, said face forming strands being fed back and forth transversely from one binder chain to the other, cutting said face strands between the binder chains thereby providing, on each of the binder chains a plurality of portions forming cut pile in the face of the fabric, and interknitting the knitting loops to form the ground cloth of the fabric and to provide on one side of the ground cloth a pile face made of the cut portions of the face forming strand.- 7

11. The method of making a fabric which consists in first forming composite yarn by knitting at least two strands into separate binder chains, simultaneously feeding a knitting strand transversely to each of the binder chains and binding portions of the same into bights of the respective binder chains, thereby to provide on, at least one side of each binder chain, a series of spaced loops of predetermined size, simultaneously feeding a plurality of face forming strands and binding portions of the same into bights of the binder chain, said face forming strands being fed at certain intervals from one binder chain to the other, and at other intervals forming loops extending from the, respective binder chains, cutting said face strand between the binder chains thereby providing, on each of the binder chains,

a plurality of portions forming out and uncut pile in the face of the fabric, and then interknitting the knitting loops to form the ground cloth of the fabric and to provide on one side of the ground cloth a face made of the cut and uncut portions of the face forming strand.

12. A composite yarn to be used for knitting a fabric, said yarn comprising a strand knitted into a binder chain, a knitting strand of sinuous form having inner portions turned around close to one side of the binder chain and with adjacent parts of said inner portions bound into the bights of the binder chain, said knitting strand also having portions extending sidewise from the other side of the binder chain to provide a series of spaced loops of predetermined size adapted to be interknitted into a fabric to form the ground cloth thereof, and a face forming strand having inner portions turned around close to one side of the binder chain and with adjacent parts of said inner portions bound into the bights of the binder chain, said face forming strand also having portions ext-ending sidewise from the binder chain to; provide pile for forming the face'o-f the fabric, the sidewise extending portions of the face forming strand being. disposed on the opposite side of the binder chain from the side upon which the extending loops of the knitting strand are disposed.

13. A composite yarn to be used for knitting a fabric, said yarn comprising a strand knitted into abinder chain, a knitting strand, and a face forming strand, the knitting strand being of sinuous form having inner portions turned around close to one side of the binder chain and with adjacent parts of said inner portions bound into. the bights of the binder chain, said knitting strand also having portions extending sidewise from the other side of the binder chain to provide a series of spaced loops of predetermined size adapted to be interknitted into a fabric to form the ground cloth thereof, and the face forming strand having inner portions turned around close to one side of the binder chain and with adjacent parts of said inner portions bound into the bights of the binder chain, said face forming strand also having portions extending sidewise; from the binder chain to provide pile for forming the face of the fabric, the sidewise extending portions of the face forming strand being disposed on the opposite side of the binder chain from the side upon which the extending loops of the knitting strand are disposed.

14. A composite yarn to be used for knitting a fabric, said yarn comprising a strand knitted into a binder chain, a knitting strand, and a face forming strand, the knitting strand being of sinuous form having inner portions turned around close to one side of the binder chain and with adjacent parts of said inner portions bound into the bights of the binder chain, said knitting strand also having portions extending sidewise from the other side of the binder chain to provide a series of spaced loops, of predetermined size adapted to be interknitted into a fabric to form the ground cloth thereof, and a face forming strand having inner portions turned around close to one side of the binder chain and with adjacent parts of said inner portions bound into the bights of the binder chain, said face forming strand also having loop portions extending sidewise from the binder chain to provide, pile for forming;v the. face ofthe fabric, the loops, of: the sidewise, extending portions of the face. forming strand being disposed on the oppositev side ofthe binder chain from that upon which the extending loops of the knitting strand are disposed;

15. The method of making a composite yarn to be used for knitting a fabriccomprising knitting a strand into a binder chain and simultaneously feeding a knitting strand and aface forming strand transversely, the knitting strand being laid in in sinuous formwith its inner portions turned around close to one side of the binder chain and with adjacent parts of said inner portions bound into the bights of the binder chain, said knitting. strand also being fed to provide portions extending outwardly sidewise from the other side of the binder chain in extending spaced loop formation, the loops being adapted to be interknitted into a fabric to form the ground cloth thereof, and the face forming strand being laid in the yarn with its inner portions turned around close to one side of the binder chain and with adjacent parts of said inner portions bound into the bights of the binder chain, saidface forming. strand being fed to provide portions extending outwardly sidewisefrom the binder chain to provide pile for forming the face of the fabric, the sidewise extending portions of the face forming strand being disposed on the opposite side of the binder chain from that upon which the extending loops of the knitting strand are disposed.

CORNELIUS A. CARNEY.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES. PATENTS Number Name Date,

139,810 Phipps June 10, 1873 1,328,903 Santoro Jan. 27', 1920 2,213,720 Seim Sept. 3, 1940 2,416,758 Knowles Mar. 1, 1947 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 1,419 Austria May 25-, 1900 25,821 Great. Britain of 1901

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US1328903 *Apr 15, 1919Jan 27, 1920Harry SantoroChenille scarf
US2213720 *Dec 13, 1937Sep 3, 1940Theodor LowenbergProduction of looped textile threads and yarns
US2416758 *Nov 9, 1945Mar 4, 1947Eileen B KnowlesYarn substitute for knitting or crocheting activities and the method of making the same
AT1419B * Title not available
GB190125821A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2747392 *Jun 22, 1954May 29, 1956Abe HoltzOpen-mesh fabric
US2779354 *Nov 30, 1954Jan 29, 1957Mohasco Ind IncChenille fabrics and method of producing same
US2845783 *Jun 11, 1957Aug 5, 1958Mohasco Ind IncChenille fur strips and method of manufacture
US2934924 *Oct 18, 1957May 3, 1960Firth Carpet Company IncKnitted pile fabrics
US3171272 *Apr 2, 1962Mar 2, 1965Hagin Frith & SonsSelvage-hung net
US6289700 *May 8, 2000Sep 18, 2001Richard P. GangiMethod of making multi-segmented chenille yarns on a crochet knitting machine
US6374643 *Dec 21, 1999Apr 23, 2002Firster Co., Ltd.Composite thread containing metal-plated yarns and warp-knit fabric thereof
DE1134789B *Oct 18, 1958Aug 29, 1974 Title not available
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/202, 66/193, 57/203
International ClassificationD04B23/00, D04B23/08
Cooperative ClassificationD04B23/08
European ClassificationD04B23/08