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Publication numberUS2541528 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 13, 1951
Filing dateJun 26, 1945
Priority dateJun 26, 1945
Publication numberUS 2541528 A, US 2541528A, US-A-2541528, US2541528 A, US2541528A
InventorsMcavoy Frank E
Original AssigneeGen Bronze Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stove grill
US 2541528 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. E. MCAVOY Feb 13, 1951 STOVE-GRILL 2 Sheets-Sheei l Filed June 26, 1945 l INVENTOR Y Fran/ EMcvoy BY A WMA) TA/,

ATTORN YS Feb. 13, 1951 F E, MCAVOY 25H52@ STOVE-GRILL Filed June 26, 1945 2 Sheecs-Sl'leel 2 l INVENTOR Patented Feb. 13, 1951 mesne; assignments, to General. Bronze Corpo,-v ration, Garden City, N. Y., a corporationof New.

York

Application `lune 26, 1945", Serial No. 601,601

3Y Claims.A

This, invention, relates to; a; portable utility charcoal stove-grillzv A n object ofthe invention resides in the provision of a` device et the character above; referred to which can be used on lawns,A beaches; woodland picnics and the like, and which possesses certain structural and functional advantages which will hereinafterbe pointed out.

It is a further object of the invention to provide; a device. of ther character referred to; on which food stuis requiring various degreesy and intensi-ties of hea-tand various times of applications or heat may be-simultaneously.-cooked; and it is a further object of the invention toy provide such a device inwhich the. heat intensi-ty applied to any,- given foodstu-ii may bevariedy during the cooking operation.

It isa furtherv object of the inventiony to con-- structthedevicesc that it will be collapsible and the parts willsubstantiallyy nest, and yetzso that when the parts areA assembledinto operativeposi-f tion the complete device wi-ll be sturdy and will withstand the' usual abusesv toP Which devices of this natureareisubjected during u se and storage.

With these and other objects in view., as will appear as the description of this invention progresses, the invention resides in1 the combination and arrangement, or parts described inZ the, specification, illustrated in the, drawing and set. forth in the appended claims.A

In` the drawings:

Figure 1 is a perspective View of the device assembled;

Figure 2f is a fron-t elevation of the device;

Figure 3y is a` View of a detail of the riren pan adjusting mechanism;

Figure- 4 is a fragmentary perspectivet View showing the manner in which the nre pan is sup ported;

Figure 5 is a detail disclosing the manner of mounting the grid on` the supporting frame; and

Figurer 6 is; a view ofthe device in its knocked down and nested condition Referring now tothe drawings, the devicer includes two end pieces, eachv of which consists of aV pair or legs I and 2, between which av web. 3 extends. These end pieces may be formed of a single piece of sheet metalv with the legs. I and 2 of tubular form., as illustrated in the drawing, but of course this particular arrangement may be varied. Ay brace i extendsY between the legs I and 2 of; each end piece and is suitably and preferably permanently secured thereto, as, for irl.- etane by weld-ing: 0,1'- other suitable.- means, and these braces d are provided with. brackets u for the reception of a removable tray 6' which, when in position, restsupon the brackets and abuts against the braces 4 to. assist inV rigidifying the structure.l which willY catch` falling ashes or burning` pieces that fall through the' holes. in thel re pan, thus protecting the lawn or other surfaceon which the stove-grill is. supported. Moreover, when the stoveegrill is disassembled andthe.v elements nested, this tray may be. placed over the fire pan and will, thus permit. the. loading. 0f the fire. pan with fuel for safe transportation.,

A grid, which includes a frame 6, preferably of rectangular form and made of angle iron, is adapted tov be supportedby thel side pieces in the following manner the frame. 6. of the, grid is pro vided at eachl corner with a, pin 'l' that isrigid with the frame, eXtends downwardly therefrom and is adapted to4 telescope into the upper open ends. of thev legs` i' andr 2, ci, the side pieces.

While, the grid may readily be. removed upwardly rom the side pieces,lit will be maintained in positionV and against relative movement by the telescopic engagement between the pins .l and the, legs I` and 2. At one or both of the, ends a tray 8 is provided, which tray is attached by re movable. pivots S to ears that extend from the webs4 3y of the side pieces. rIhese trays 8 may be swung4 into downwardly extended position when not in use, but may be swung upwardly into a horizontalposition for use and maintained in such position by braces IEB that are swingingly mounted at I I on the webs 3. Of course it is to be` understood` that the device may be provided with either or both of these trays or indeed both may be omitted in one phase ofthe invention.

It desired, one or both of the trays may be removed from the supporting webs by removing the pivots il and one or both of the trays may be placed over the grid, as indicated in dotted lines in Figure 1 of the drawings, the distances between the side anges ofl the trays being suicient to permit, the side flanges to embrace the outside faces oi theY vertical webs of the frame 6. Thus the side and end flanges of the tray will position the tray on the gridframe.

A fire pan I2 is provided, which is preferably of rectangular outline and is of sufficient size to t betweenthe webs 3 and to bey substantially coextensive, with the area of thegrid. This fire pan i.2v,vhichis open atits top, isprovided with draft openings I3, and with a transverse, partition I4, which also has draft openings i5 therein.

The, provision of thel transverse, partition in the fire pan resolves. the re pan, into. a plu,-

This tray acts asy an ash receiver 3 rality of fire boxes which may be of equal or unequal size. Thus it is possible to provide a heat source in either or both of the fire boxes and consequently to provide two heat sources of unequal valuations.

In order that the fire pan may be raised and lowered horizontally or one end raised or lowered to a greater extent than the other, I have provided the following mechanism: a loop or guide I6 is constructed on each of the webs 3 and a similar and aligned loop or guide Il is constructed on each of the braces 4. A slide I8 is adapted to be moved upwardly and downwardly through these loops or guides, each slide being capable of movement independently of the other. This independent movement of the slides is accomplished by means of handles i9 which are pivoted at on the rear legs, and the forward ends of which are free to have upward and downward movement and a certain degree of lateral movement. These free ends of the handles I9 are engageable with supporting lugs 2l on the legs by which means it will be possible to support the handles at various points of vertical adjustment. The handles are pivoted by means of pins 22 to the slides I8, slots 23 being provided in the handles and through which the pins extend, which permit of the Vertical movement of the slides under the influence of the pivotal movement of the handles.

Depending legs 24 are secured to the slides I8 and are provided at their upper ends with 4cross heads 24', which carry lugs 25' with which the re pan l2 is adapted to be removably engaged. Thus when the slides move upwardly or downwardly under the influence of the force applied to the handles i9 they will carry the fire pan with them and the fire pan may thus be raised or lowered as occasion requires.

Thus with this construction and mounting of the re pan it is possible to raise or lower the fire pan while maintaining it in a horizontal position and thus cause the heat source to be moved closer to or further away from the grid. This of course is valuable, since it is desirable with some food stuffs to rst subject them to a moderate degree of ambient heat and a moderate degree of radiant heat and to then increase the intensity of the ambient and radiant heats.

Moreover, the adjustability of this i-lre pan makes it possible to replenish it with fuel during any given cooking operation without necessitating the removal of the food stuis or the removal of the grid.

When such a condition is encountered, the re pan may be lowered to the desired position for initial cooking and then gradually raised to intensify the application of both types of heat to the food stuis.

Then again it is sometimes desirable, when food stuis of different characters and requiring different heat applications are being simultaneously cooked, to apply a relatively intense degree of ambient and radiant heat to one food stuff and a relatively low ambient and radiant heat to the other food stun'. This may be accomplished by lowering one side of the fire pan while allowing the other to be in a raised pesition, and then, if it is desirable to intensify the application of the heat to the food stuff which has previously received the heat of low intensity, the lowered side of the fire pan may be raised. Likewise if it is desirable to lower the intensity of the heat which has been applied at high n- 4 tensity initially that side of the re pan may be lowered.

Additionally, after a cooking operation, if it is desired to keep the food stul Warm Without any material cooking, either before or after the cooking has taken place, the fire pan may be lowered away from the grid to a great extent with the result that the cooking effect will be reduced to the minimum and yet the heating effect will be maintained.

By.k making the trays 8 removable and receivable by the grid one or both trays may be placed over the grid, as indicated in dotted lines in Figure 1, and used as a cooking top for frying, pan broiling or similar cooking, while the other portion of the grid may be used for ordinary broiling or roasting operations. It will be realized, of course, that when one or both of the trays have been placed over the grid and food stuiTs placed on the trays, the trays being of the proper material, the radiant heat from the fuel will be absorbed by the trays and reradiated at a modified wave length to the food stuff and also the intensity of the radiant heat will, because of the presence of the trays, be reduced. Moreover, the trays may be made of radiant heat reflecting material to greater reduce the radiant heat reaching the food stni being cooked.

In Figure 6 of the drawings I have shown the device in its knocked-down and nested condition. It will be seen from this gure that the grid may be turned upside down so that the pins 'l extend upwardly. The iire pan is of such dimensions that it may be nested 0n the grid within the confines of the pins and because of the presence of the vertical webs of the grid frame and the braces 4 the ire pan will be prevented from slipping from the ends and the side of the grid.

The two side pieces, with the trays that they carry folded upon them, may be separately placed upon the thus nested grid and fire pan in superimposed relation as illustrated. Thus the device may be collapsed and the various parts nested for storage and shipment.

While I have illustrated and described one embodiment of my invention, it will be realized that within the scope of the claims many structural and design variations may be made and I therefore do not wish to be limited to the precise disclosure except as is made necessary by the claims.

I claim:

1. In a stove grill, the combination which includes a pair of spaced end pieces, each end piece comprising a pair of spaced legs having open upper ends and a web attached to and extending between said legs, a grid having pins extending therefrom and removably mounted in said open ends, a brace secured to and extending between the legs in each said pair in spaced relation to and below said web, a vertical slide extending between said brace and said web of each end piece and slidably mounted thereon, a nre pan rigidly and removably mounted on the upper ends of said slides beneath said removable grid, and handles connected with said slides adjacent their lower ends for moving said slides vertically to adjust said iire box to different positions beneath said removable grid, each of said handles being pivoted to one legr of each pair and having slidable pivotal connection with the adjacent slide, and means on the other leg of said pair to engage said handle and maintain it in various positions and to support said fire box in its various positions of adjustment.

2. In a stove-grill, the combination which includes a pair of spaced end pieces, each end piece comprising a pair of spaced legs having open upper ends and a web attached to and extending between said legs, a grid having pins extending therefrom and removably mounted in said open ends, a brace secured to and extending between the legs in each said pair in spaced relation to and below said web, a vertical slide extending between said brace and said web of each end piece and slidably mounted thereon, and a fire pan rigidly and removably mounted on the upper ends of said slides beneath said removable grid, the upper end of each slide being bifurcated with one arm thereof extending slidably through a loop on the adjacent web and the other arm thereof carrying a cross head for the support of the adjacent end of said fire box, which cross head is rigid with said arm.

3. In a stove-grill, the combination which includes a pair of spaced end pieces, each end piece comprising a pair of spaced legs having open upper ends and a web attached to and extending between said legs, a grid having pins extending therefrom and removably mounted in said open ends, a brace secured to and extending between the legs in each said pair in spaced relation to and below said web, a vertical slide extending between said brace and said web of each end piece and slidably mounted thereon, a re pan rigidly and removably mounted on the upper ends of said slides beneath said removable grid,

and handles connected with said slides adjacent y REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 6,255X Disbrow Nov. 22, 1830 135,735 Stone Feb. 11, 1873 221,682 Kintz Nov. 18, 1879 354,922 Miller Dec. 28, 1886 589,056 White Aug. 31, 1897 754,482 Mulveny Mar. 15, 1904 956,064 Fish et al Apr. 26, '1910 1,160,233 Wolkenhauer Nov. 16, 1915 1,438,345 Tait Dec. 12, 1922 1,796,033 Lee Mar. 10, '1931 2,114,697 Babin Apr. 19, 1938 2,122,275 Bitney June 28,1938 2,307,914 Bitney Jan. 12, 1943 2,334,847 Spiers Nov. 23, 1943 2,335,217 Tate Nov. 23, 1943

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2666426 *Aug 4, 1950Jan 19, 1954Pollard Maurice BPortable barbecue and range
US2740395 *Apr 1, 1954Apr 3, 1956Goodwin Fred WBrazier
US2766091 *Feb 8, 1955Oct 9, 1956Corry Jamestown Mfg CorpSuspension for extendable typewriter shelf
US2768042 *Jul 9, 1956Oct 23, 1956Big Boy Mfg CompanyTable attachment for barbecue equipment
US2780215 *Jan 15, 1953Feb 5, 1957Holland Ind IncFolding cooking stove
US2787995 *Jun 5, 1950Apr 9, 1957Cook N Tools IncCooker
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US2817331 *Feb 17, 1953Dec 24, 1957Louis KaplanFour-way broiler stove
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Classifications
U.S. Classification126/25.00A, 126/154, 99/427, 126/9.00R, 312/351.3
International ClassificationF24B1/00, F24B1/20
Cooperative ClassificationF24B1/202
European ClassificationF24B1/20B