Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2542619 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 20, 1951
Filing dateMay 7, 1949
Priority dateMay 22, 1948
Publication numberUS 2542619 A, US 2542619A, US-A-2542619, US2542619 A, US2542619A
InventorsBernhardt Ella H
Original AssigneeBernhardt Ella H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Breast form
US 2542619 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 20, 1951 E. H. BERNHARDT BREAST FORM Filed May '7, 1949 JNVENTOIL t' 3 AWO/@N957 Patented Feb. 20, 1951 UNITED STATES yP A';.";NT 1()fl;"l"lCE BREAST FORM yElla H. Bernhardt, New York, X. Application-May 7, 1949, serial No. 91,961 anonime. (cina-2.67.)

"'I-he present invention .relatesto prosthetic de vices and more particularly to a conformable breast form containinga quantity of a .liquider a `conformable gel. This `application is a .continuation-in-part of :my ico-pending application Serial No. 28,563, filed May 22, 1943.

The breast forms are especially designedforiuse as a breast form after a surgiCalopeIatiOn. In such cases the figure of the -personfoften presents an unpleasing appearance and the formgisworn to maintain the normal figure `orontline yof vthe bust. In other instances, theforms are'worn by Women with vsmall underdeveloped :breasts fin order to improve theirfgures.

It is important that the form be :conformable to the shape of the breast oriremainder lof ,the breast of the wearergan'd of `proper Weight soxthat it may be Worn for long periods 'of -time Without discomfort. Further, the form should be so constructed that it constantly .and automaticallygconforms to the remaining breast in shape-and appearance, as that breast risalfected `by the position assumed by the wearer.

Heretofore, some forms have been-made of wire reinforced padding, others `have 'been made 4of flexible fabric stuffed Withalling such'as hair, feathers or cotton, still othershave been'molded of sponge rubber, in addition, air lled sacs and distendible sacs inflated with water have been used. These devices all have a relatively `fixed shape, and 'a relatively constant volume, or are rather inconformable and ido not realistically reproduce the change in shape and the movement of a normal breast. Some of the prior devices have been generally satisfactory for use when the wearer is in a standingposition and not in motion. However, when the wearer assumesa Vsitting or prone position,ior takes lpart in exercise, the movement of `the prior art appliances are often unnatural and uncomfortable inasmuch ,as ,these appliances ,do not .duplicate the changing shape of the remaining breast. The unnatural and uncomfortable position ofthe appliance is especially noticeable in Women of middle age who `make up the greater percentage of those with surgicaly removed breasts. The apparent Waist portion of an average person shortens about one to ytvvo inches when the person isseategd. The apparent shortening is more pronounced inpatients with faulty posture such as isfrequently assumed post-operatively. The full slanting Vdiaphragm and often large abdomen pushes the usual appliance still higher whenthe person is seated. 'lo counteract this movement, straps engaging with the corset or girdle are often used tofpull therapmance-downwardly. .'Ihe.(strainset up by such 'st-raps not only y.causes discomfort at `the shouldersrbnt actuallyserousiydnterferesfwithfthecirs culation oishoulder .andarm and because of the recent operation often produces congestion Moreover, vin fmany tosses, the prior appliances have been dinicultsor `impossible to cleanfor'ren.- ovate and `When-'sofcleaned often losetheir-.prginal shapeeand presentfan Aunsightly appearance. The L'present invention :aims lIto lovercome :the foregoing diliiculties and disadvantages by .rpro viding .1a-form whch'is-more :natural :in appear.- a-nce and readily conforms 'to 'the Yshape -of the natural bust regardless'of themovements of the wearer, andV that requires -no special 'harness to wea-r.

Another Yobject'o'f "theinvention is to provide a 'form Awhich is sanitary, `.and Which may *be Washed easily and `repeatedly 4Without adversely affecting its `Wea-rability.

These objects are accomplished by providing a conformable cell, atleast partially lled with a liguid, or aconformable Agelfa'nd a-'gas The cell isadapted lto ,be carriedinfthe unmodied cup of an ordinary brassire, -or-in a brassire cupprovided with a retainer, or in the ordinaryitype of form-fitting .bathing suit, so that inuse, the c ell isconformed toithe-shape'an'd volume ofthe availablespace `between the brassire, and 'the breast ror the ,remainder of the breast, so as ,to produce the desired appearance. BY .reason of the iillingmateriaLand,the amount used,..the cell is notdistended lor `xeldlin -shane but vautomatically assumes the .shapeandcontour of thenormal breast regardless of the position or movement ofthe wearer.

AIn -anothenconstruction ,the liquid filling. material .includesa Afoaming agent, Aso that under normal bodily movements, no y.appreciable sound caused byra movementof .thecontents `mais' bedetested.

In f another kconstructicn tof .the form, .it enclosed in an `outer Iprotecting envelope s oas .to prevent ,asudden;escapeiof-,theliquid in the .event of ,apuncturezorfruptureof:the `retaining.celllzangl thenllingimaterialjincludesfan ,agent-that coagulates upon evaporation, thus-this cell issubstam tialy as elffsalng,

ln .anctherrconstruction -of the inventrl a cellular :structure is. provided within the retain- Iilg C611 So :as wto impede fthe movement :of fthe liquid.-and-thnsitofcauserthe form to more nearly simulate the normal movements of the natural zbtlast..

with which it is used or worn, regardless of its style, whether uplifted, pointed, rounded or pendulous, thus the wearer may use a brassire of the same style as worn before the breast removal and be assured that the outer clothing will fit without alterations.

appearance areY important improvements over prior appliances.

conforms to the shape .of the cavity left by the breast removal, and accordingly the appliance may be worn soon after an operation while tise sues are still sensitive. Moreover, the breast form because of its smooth and'fiowing characteristics protects the sensitive area and prevents friction thereon from the movement of the arms or clothing. The form quickly assumes .the body temperature and is Ymore "comfortableto the wearer" asv it'radiates heat and feels .co'oler 1than many of the prior appliances. As `its weight is approximately that 'of the nonmal breast, no straps or other means Yare needed to holdit in position and its weight has a compensating effect inhelping toovercome unequal shoulder carriage, which is a frequent result of a major mastectomy. in* The correctweight of the breast form reestablishes body balance. After a major mastectomy,

aylack of such balance results invphysical in stability which often causes mental instabilities and phobias in patients, such as fearv of falling when descending stairs, and fear of walliing on wet streets. l A Y.

I, Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description and from the accompanying 'drawings .which show, by way of example; embodimentsfof the invention.

,1 In the drawings:

Fig. 1 isa perspective View of a breastform worn with a brassire and shown in position on af female figure, the conformableY cell being po.

sitioned in a pocket in the brassire v.and outlined in dotted lines.

Fig. 2 is a partial plan viewof the cell. j. Fig. 3 is a cross sectional view of the cell and brassire taken substantially 'along the line 3-3 `of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a view corresponding to Fig. 3 of a modified form of the cel showing a cellular structure within the cell formed ofv a plurality of small cells in liquid.

Fig. 5 is a View corresponding to Fig. 3 of a modified form of the cell showing a cellular `structure within the cell formed of a plurality of pieces of a sponge-like material in liquid.

Fig; 6 isa View corresponding to Fig. 3 of a "modified 'form of the cell-showing a protective "envelope enclosing the cell, the cell being filled 'with a preferred liquid.

Referring to the drawings, in' Fig. 1 the .con- 'formable cell Ill, indicated in dotted lines, is

located in the brassire 'cup I2 of brassire I3 "adapted to support and conform said cell, the Iassembly being worn on the .female form as shown.

The brassire I3 may be of any suitable form Further, thefforrn has smooth and flowing characteristics and thereforel readily,

4 and is preferably of the same type or shape as worn by the wearer before the mastectomy.

As shown in Fig. 3 the brassire cup I2 is provided with a cell retainer I5 which may be a piece of soft textile material sewn along the sides and bottom of the inside of the brassire cup. A flap I5 is provided to cover the opening at the top of the brassire cup.

Y, As canY best be understood by a comparison of Figs. 2 and 4, the cell In has a front wall I'I and a back wall I8, formed from a water impervious Aflexible sheet material, the peripheries of the My breast forms mobilityj and softness to touch as well as its.. improved walls are joined together and sealed along the .line I9. Alternately, the cell may be molded'in brassire cup. The rear wall I8 is generally fiat though it may also be convex-concave if worn as a breast form over underdeveloped breasts, or may be concave-convex if meant to ll a particularly large cavity resulting from a.y major operation.

In Fig. 2, end 20 of the cell, shown as broken away, may be extended or modified as necessary to fit'along the axillary side of the wearer to fill a surgical' cavity which may extend in that direction.

As shown in Fig. 2, an unsealed portion 2I of the cell Ill is provided as a means of placing the contents in the cell. After this operation, this portion 2| is sealed.

As shown in Fig. 3 the cell Ill is at least partially filled with a conformable filler II, which may be a liquid or a conformable gel, and gas 22 atatmospheric pressure.

Another embodiment of my invention is as shownin Fig. 4. in which the cell, constructed as above described, is at least .partially lled with a plurality of small cells 23 of preferably ellipsoidal shape. Each of the cells 23 is at least partially filled with conformable filler II which maybe a liquid or a conformable gel, and a gas 22 at atmospheric pressure. l Surrounding the cells 23 is ller II, which is a liquid; to provide lubrication and other desirable qualities as will later appear. The cell Il) is thus partially filled with the cells 23, and liquid filler I I and gas 22 at atmospheric pressure.

' front wall 26, and a rear wall 21, made of a flexibleuid impervious material, the front and rear *walls being joined at their respective peripheries and sealed along the line 23. Alternately the envelope may be molded in onel piece. The envelope 25 contains cell I0 plus a small quantity of gas 22v at atmospheric pressure. The envelope 25 may also contain a quantity of a highly water 'absorbent powdensuch as bentonite (not shown).

vNote that in Fig. 6, the liquid filler I I and gas 22 .contained in cell IB, is .shown in a foaming condition 29. A conformable gel may also be used to fill cell I6.

' It is of course apparent thatthe embodiment shown in Figs. 3, 4 and 5, may be combined with the outer envelope shown in Fig. 6, and as described above.

"l'lreiwalls c'f 4fthe cells, `both small .rand liar-ge. and the envelope described above, asin iFig. .6, $arefmadfe of la :flexible 'sheet material `that is fimfpelivious vto -the passageio'f water orfair. :My preferred-material is affiexible'sheet of thematerial known as Vinylite "This material is la highly `nplastieized copolymer :of vin-ylchloride rand .vinyl 'acetate resin, and has the advantages :of `being Vcheaper and vmore 1frame resistant than rubber, Eis :flexible at body temperature, and is resistant 'to the action'of body perspiration. .Ihave found Ithat use of Vinylite -sheet stock twelve .thousandths of an inch (0.0l2) thick results `rin a 'cell that is 4strong and durable, Yand commercially satisfactory.

'The walls of vthe cell are joined vtogether by `cementing, or if the :material is Vinylite, by w`sealingthe edges together by the "so-called elecitronic 'sealing method `which makesY use ofV high frequency vcurrents to accomplish the heat sealvIng.

The contents of the cell `are Acomposed of gas fa't'atmospheric pressure, and a fillerwhich may be a liquid orf-a conformable gel. v'Where hereinfafter inthe claims or the specification. the words conformable ller'are used, it is intended to fmean'both a liquid 4and a conformable gel. These materials are incompressible, 'as 'distinguished from materialslike sponge rubber, and substan- "tially inexpansible as distinguished from gases. My .preferred liquidifs water, to which vI mayadd aa 'foaming :agent and ra Vsealing agent. When "less'thancallof a lcell .is filled with a liquid, the liquid sloshes about and makesfaddible :sounds .when 'the .icell is :moved Thus ia .foaming agent, which ,reduces these sounds to .substantial in- -aiudi'bility, .overcomes .fthejgreat 'disadvantage of :a 'flexible cell ,partially filled Withca liquid. The advantages of incorporatingza sealing agent, in :case'df a puncture or ,corrosionzor rotting of the :cell walls, is obvious. "Other liquids which `may be used are; oils, emulsions of cil-and wateigsoap mixtures, `thickened oils, suspensions land emulssions inzoil'and'water,.siliconjliquids such asDow- Corning DC 200 silicon `fluid (a heat-stable, or

gano-'silicon oxide polymer), 'and liquid latex.

I have found that `the material known as ,Vinylseal adhesive Vif-125, which .is a water- `solublefplastic resin, containing minimum solids 'of about 5.0 %.by`weight, of :which 1.5% .by weight monomeric vinyl acetate, and having a vis- `cosity:exceeding300.0 centipoises, a pH of 4.5-to 5.0 and a weight ofz925llbs. per gallon .atGGo F.,

aand Ywhich is sold as "an adhesive, also -has `the property `of :foaming when mixed with water tand fagitated. ,Thismixture will Valso coagulate lon evaporation, and when :containedin the cell, itheellbeng punctured, the mixture will function to seal .the puncture. .The'fself :sealing efl ,feetzlisparticularlygoed when the cellzis a second envelope `(as shown .LingFig 6). When the .double 'cell Yis puncture@ fierylittle .liquid eescapes completely, las most of it spreads in a thin film between the walls, and quickly forms a sealing C1011- conditionby thef normalimovements 'of'zthe .wearerfofithezform, and iwill scalrsatisfactorily. Variations of the above proportions of water :and Vinylseal adhesive Nif-'125, may be used .depending lon the viscosity, foaming characteristics, and 'sealing qualities desired.

An `amount of liquid or conformable vgel filler is usedthat will approximate the Weight of tissue that has .been removed. An amount of gas at atmospheric pressure, preferably air, is also allowed 4in .the cell .before sealing, 'this amount of air is necessary so that the liquid mixtures may foam :and `also to produce a cell that can change lin "vo-lumeunder pressure, and that `will reproduce a'volume under pressure correspondring to the volume of tissue lacking.

Inorder toachieve a comfortable, conformable cell, the possible'total'volume of the cell is generally not entirely utilized. Ilhis :is simply .accomplished by pressing a portion of the walls ofthe cell together :after the conformable filler has been put .in "the cell, and during the `:final sealing step. The amount of conformable filler generallyxshould noti-lll theavailable space, some space being 'left for air. The cell'is sealed with the entrapped liquid or conformable gel and air 'generally filling only a portion of the total possible volume o'f the cell.

As an example, 'inzmy manufacture of cells for certainprosthetic'uses, not requiring special individual "fitting, I have 'found that it is necessary fto provide a Vcomplete range :of sizes for both `left and fright breasts. kOf course, teach size breast is different rin weightarfd shape r.from the other. The cells all have flat back walls, the Wall material ibeing conformable enough to ll in around uneven scar tissue Iformations 'over ^the chest, and "at the axillary region.

However, AI have found Vthat in manufacturing all these ready-made forms that the proportions `of gas and Aconformable filler are -about the same. I generally fill each cell full (of its possible total volume) with conformable ller, and leave 'approximately '10% to 15% of the cellvolume fasfdead* space. The remainder Vof the possible volume of the cell, i. e., between 25% and 12.01% y is `lled with air 'at about atmospheric pressure.

Tnmy manufacture of ycells for cosmetic pur- -posesfthe 'cellsare'different in shapeand weight than the aforementioned cells.

'As shown in :my examplesin Figs. 3 and `6, Aa conformable gel may `be used to partially fill the 'cell 1l. vlThe conformable gel is used as above described for the use of liquid. A `suitvale conformable gel material is the product known as "Bouncing Putty grade 9991-41 manufactured by the General Electric Comfpany. :'Said Bouncing Putty may be modified with oil, .greasy'substances Aor substances lcon- 'A's shown in my example in Fig. 4, the small cells 23 may be partially filled with conformable fgelin place of liquid. while the cell Il is par- `tially Tilledwith liquid.

ABy reason o'f the plurality of `cells shownin .Fig '4, or the cellular material shown in Fig `5,

contained in the .retaining cell, a somewhat :more gradual :change .in "the shape of theretaining cell `occurs fas Vthe wearer assumes difvpressure at least partially filling the ferent positions; These cells thus very closely approximate the shape changes of the normal breast. Y

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A breast form comprising a conformable retaining cell, a conformable, incompressible, inexpansible iiller and a gas at approximately atmospheric pressure in said cell, the combined volumes of said filled and gas at least partially filling the cell. 2. A breast form comprising a conformable retaining cell, a conformable incompressible ller and a gas at approximately atmospheric pressure in said cell, the combined volumes of said filler and gas at least partially filling the cell, and the Weight per unit volume of said gas and filler approximately equalling the weight per unit volume of human tissue.

3. A breast form comprising a conformable retaining cell, a liquid and a gas at approximately atmospheric pressure in said cell, the combined volumes at least partially filling said cell.

4. The breast form of claim 1, wherein said ller is a liquid adapted to coagulate upon evaporation.

5. The breast form of claim 4 enclosed in a flexible envelope impervious to fluids whereby the cell will seal itself when punctured. K

6. A breast form comprising a conformable retaining cell, a foaming liquid adapted to coagulate upon evaporation and a gas at approximately atmospheric pressure in said cell, the combined volumes at least partially filling said cell. i

'7.' The breast form of claim 1, wherein said ller is a conformable gel.

8. A breast form comprising a'conformable retaining cell, a plurality of pieces of spongelike material, and "a liquid, and a gas at approximately atmospheric pressure in said cell, the combined volumes at least partially filling said cell.

9. The breast form of claim 8 wherein the liquid is a foaming liquid adapted to coagulate upon evaporation. and said cell is enclosed in a flexible envelope impervious to fluids. l0. A breast form comprising a conformable retaining cell, a plurality of smaller cells in said cell, a conformable' ller and a gas at approximately atmospheric pressure at least partially ,filling the smaller cells, said smaller cellsand 'a liquid and a gas at approximately atmospheric remaining volume in the retaining cell.

11. The breast form of Claim'lO wherein-*the conformable filler and the liquid is a foaming lliquid adapted to coagulate upon evaporation.

' 12. The breast form of claim 2'enclosed in a flexible envelope impervious tofluids. n

13. A breast form comprising a'lconformable retaining cell, a mixture of water, a'watersolvent resin adapted to`foain upon agitation and to coagulate upon evaporation, and a'gas at approximately atmospheric pressure in 'Said cell, the combined volumes at least partially filling said cell. Y 14. A breast form having front and rear Wall formed from a flexible sheet of resin'comprising the -plasticized copolymers o'fvinyl chloride andvinyl acetate, a mixture of Water, a Water ksolvent resin adapted to foam upon agitation and to ccagulate upon evaporation, and a gas at approximately atmospheric pressure `in said cell, the combined volumes at least partially lling said cell.

15.l The breast form of claim 14 enclosed in an envelope having front and rear Walls formed from a flexible sheet of resin comprising the plasticized copolymers of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate. Y

16. A breast form comprising a conformable retaining cell, said Cell having front and rear walls formed of flexible sheet Vinylite, a mixtureof Water, Vinylseal Adhesive W-125, and a gas at approximately atmospheric pressure in said cell, the combined volumes at least partially lling said cell.

1' 7. The breast form of claim 16 in which the proportions of water and Vinylseal adhesive W-125, are approximately equal to each other.

18. A breast form comprising a conformable retaining cell, a conformable ller and a gas at approximately atmospheric pressure in said cell, the combined volumes of said ller and gas at least partially lling the cell, said cell being enclosed in a flexible envelope impervious to fluids, and a highly liquid-absorbent material contained within said envelope and Without said cell.

19. In combination with a brassire, a exible retaining cell, and a foaming uid at least partially lling the cell, the brassire conforming the flexible cell to the desired shape.

20. In combination with a brassire, a flexible retaining cell, fluid at least partially lling the cell, and an envelope impervious to the fluid, the envelope enclosing the cell, the brassire conforming the envelope and the fluid filled cell to the desired shape.

21. In combination with a brassire having a pocket therein, a flexible retaining cell, and a foaming fluid at least partially filling the cell, the pocket supporting the uid filled cell and 'the brassire conforming it to the desired shape.

22. In combination with a brassire, a flexible retaining cell, a cellular structure within the fluid retaining cell, and fluid at least partially lling the cell and lling and surrounding the cellular structure, the retaining cell conformed to the desired shape by the brassire.

23. In combination with a brassire, a flexible retaining cell, a cellular structure Within the fluid retainingV cell, iiuid at least partially filling the cell and filling and surrounding the cellular structure, and an envelope impervious to the fluid enclosed in the fluid retaining cell, the retaining cell and the envelope conformed to the desired shape by the brassire.

24. In combination with a brassire, a flexible retaining cell, a plurality of smaller cells, fluid at least partially filling the smaller cells, the smaller cells enclosed within the retaining cell, and "fluid at least partially filling the remaining space in the retaining cell, theretaining .cell conformed to the desired shape by the brassire.

25,'1In combination with a brassire, a flexible retaining cell, a plurality of smaller cells, fluid at least partially filling the smaller cells, vthe smaller cells enclosed Within the retaining cell, iiuidat least partially filling the remaining space in the retaining cell, and an envelope impervious 'tothe fluid enclosed in the fluid retaining cell, "theretaining cell and the envelope conformed the desired shape by the brassire.

the cell, and an envelope impervious to liquid and complet,ly enclosing the uid cell.

28. An articial breast form comprising a flexible retaining cell, a cellular structure Within the cell, and substantially incompressible uid at least partially filling the retaining cell and filling and surrounding the cellular structure.

29. An artificial breast form comprising a exible retaining cell, a cellular structure within the cell, fluid at least partially filling the retaining cell and filling and surrounding the cellular structure, and an envelope impervious to the fluid enclosed in the fluid retaining cell.

30. An artificial breast form comprising a flexible retaining cell, a plurality of smaller cells, a substantially incompressible fluid at least par-V tially filling the smaller cells, the smaller cells enclosd Within the retaining cell, and uid at least partially filling the remaining space in the retaining cell.

3l. An artificial breast form comprising a flexible retaining cell, a plurality of smaller cells, fluid at least partially lling the smaller cells, the smaller cells enclosed within the retaining cell, fluid at least partially filling the remaining space in the retaining cell, and an envelope imperious to the fluid enclosed in the fluid retaining cell.

32. A breast form comprising a liquid impervious cell of flexible material, a conformable liquid ller and a gas at approximately atmospheric pressure within said cell, said ller being substantially noiseless when agitated by normal body motions, the said ller occupying a major portion of the volume of said cell and the combined volume of said ller and gas being less than the total possible volume of said cell, and a flexible envelope of material impervious to said filler fitting loosely around said cell whereby upon accidental rupture of said cell, the leaked portions of said ller are retained within said envelope.

33. A breast form comprising a liquid impervious cell of flexible material, a conformable liquid filler and a gas at approximately atmospheric pressure within said cell, said ller being substantially noiseless when agitated by normal body motions, the volume of said filler being approximately 80% of the total possible volume of said cell and the Volume of said gas being approximately 30% of said total possible volume, and a iiexible envelope of material impervious to said filler fitting loosely around said cell Whereby upon accidental rupture of said cell, the leaked portions of said filler are retained within said envelope.

34. A breast form comprising a liquid impervious cell of flexible material, a conformable liquid filler and a gas at approximately atmospheric pressure Within said cell, said filler being substantially noiseless when agitated by normal body motions, the combined volumes of said filler and gas bling less than the total possible volume of said cell, the combined weight per unit of their total volume of said gas and ller approximately equalling the weight per unit volume of human tissue, and a flexible envelope of material impervious to said filler tting loosely around said cell whereby upon accidental rupture of said cell, the leaked portions of said filler are retained within said envelope.

35. A breast form comprising a liquid impervious cell of flexible material, a conformable liquid filler and a gas at approximately atmospheric pressure with said cell, said filler being substantially noiseless when agitated by normal body motions, the volume of said filler being approximately of the total possible volume of said cell and said gas being approximately 30% of said total possible volume, the combined weight per unit of their total volume of said gas and ller approximately equalling the Weight per unit volume of human tissue, and a flexible envelope of material impervious to said filler tting loosely around said cell whereby upon accidental rupture of said cell, the leaked portions of said filler are retained within said envelope.

36. An artificial breast form comprising a ilexible retaining cell and a conformable gel at least partially lling said cell, said gel comprising Bouncing Putty.

ELLA H. BERNHARDT.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 326,915 Morehouse Sept. 22, 1889 599,180 Harrison Feb. 15, 1898 861,115 Harrison July 23, 1907 1,721,739 Kennedy July 23, 1929 2,108,205 Martin Feb. 15, 1938 2,345,649 Zimmerman et al. Apr. 4, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 7,338 Great Britain May 20, 1887

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US326915 *Sep 22, 1885 House
US599180 *Apr 22, 1897Feb 15, 1898 Bosom-pad
US861115 *Nov 6, 1906Jul 23, 1907Dora HarrisonCombined bust-form and arm-pad.
US1721739 *Feb 17, 1928Jul 23, 1929Daniel J KennedyBreast protector
US2108205 *Dec 1, 1936Feb 15, 1938Martin Elsie LBreast pad and the like
US2345649 *Dec 4, 1939Apr 4, 1944ZimmermanBrassiere
GB188707338A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2636182 *Aug 23, 1951Apr 28, 1953Ruth FreedmanArtificial body bulge
US2651783 *Nov 22, 1950Sep 15, 1953Gates Dora ERestoration surgical breast
US2698436 *Jun 29, 1951Jan 4, 1955Bernhardt Ella HBust form
US2992940 *Jan 23, 1957Jul 18, 1961Goodyear Tire & RubberTreatment of cellular materials
US3293663 *Aug 12, 1963Dec 27, 1966Dow CorningSurgically implantable human breast prosthesis
US3339283 *Oct 21, 1964Sep 5, 1967Handel Ambrose B VanDentues with hydraulic cushioning means
US3548420 *Mar 6, 1967Dec 22, 1970Stryker CorpCushion structure
US3896506 *Jan 13, 1975Jul 29, 1975Hankin GeorgeBreast prosthesis
US3911503 *Jan 21, 1974Oct 14, 1975Hankin GeorgeBreast prosthesis
US3986213 *May 27, 1975Oct 19, 1976Medical Engineering CorporationGel filled medical devices
US4380569 *Aug 3, 1981Apr 19, 1983Spenco Medical CorporationGlass microspheres, vinyl polysiloxane, hydrogen polysiloxane, prosthetics
US4507810 *Jan 29, 1982Apr 2, 1985Polar-Plastik HbImplantable breast prostheses
US4731081 *Sep 17, 1985Mar 15, 1988Mentor CorporationBreast prosthesis
US4828559 *Dec 21, 1987May 9, 1989Bert GreenbergBreast form
US5246454 *Jul 22, 1991Sep 21, 1993Peterson Robert LEncapsulated implant
US5383929 *Nov 27, 1991Jan 24, 1995Ledergerber; Walter J.Implantable prosthetic device
US5447535 *Dec 9, 1993Sep 5, 1995Muller; Guy-HenriMammary prosthesis
US5496370 *Jul 19, 1993Mar 5, 1996Robert S. HamasGel-like prosthetic device
US5534023 *Apr 11, 1994Jul 9, 1996Henley; Julian L.Fluid filled prosthesis excluding gas-filled beads
US5824081 *Sep 13, 1996Oct 20, 1998Lipomatrix IncorporatedHydraulic foam tissue implant
US8202316Jan 28, 2009Jun 19, 2012Ledergerber Walter JModulating buttress saline mammary prosthesis
EP0824001A2 *Aug 1, 1997Feb 18, 1998Sui-Mu WangInflatable prosthesis insertable in adjustable brassiere
Classifications
U.S. Classification623/7, 521/145, D24/155
International ClassificationA41C3/10, A61F2/52, A41C3/00, A61F2/50
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2/52, A41C3/10
European ClassificationA61F2/52, A41C3/10