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Publication numberUS2543981 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 6, 1951
Filing dateAug 6, 1948
Priority dateMay 15, 1946
Publication numberUS 2543981 A, US 2543981A, US-A-2543981, US2543981 A, US2543981A
InventorsMunao Carmelo C, Philip Munao
Original AssigneeMunao Carmelo C, Philip Munao
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making an artificial flame log assembly
US 2543981 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 6, 1951 P. MUNAO ETAL METHOD OF MAKING AN ARTIFICIAL FLAME LOG ASSEMBLY Filed Aug. 6, 1948 HIEMM Y INVENTORJ PHILIP MUHAO y CARMELO C. MUNAO (C5 $772751? Patented Mar. 6, 1951 METHOD OF MAKING AN ARTIFICIAL FLAME LOG ASSEMBLY Philip Munaoand Carmelo C. Munao, Brooklyn, N. Y.

Original application May 15, 1946, Serial No. 670,005. Divided and this application August 6, 1948, Serial No. 42,885

6 Claims. 1

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in a method of constructing an imitation flame for use in a fireplace or other similar use. This application is a division of our co-pending application Serial No. 670,005 filed May 15, 1946, now U. S. Patent No. 2,448,906 granted September '7, 1948. 1

More particularly, the present invention proposes a novel method of constructing an imitation flame from a plurality of parallel superimposed logs joined in a novel method by a resinous plastic material arranged in a manner so that when the assembly is positioned over a light source the resinous plastic material will act to convey the light rays about the logs to illuminate the resinous plastic material throughout giving the appearance of a flame.

Still further, the invention proposes allowing the molten resinous plastic material to drip from the assembly While being applied and during hardening of the resinous plastic material in a manner to provide the resinous plastic material with imitation flame tips.

A further object of the invention proposes so positioning the logs relative to each other that spaces between the logs will be filled with the resinous plastic material during application in a manner to form entrance points for the light rays from the light source located beneath the logs.

Still another object of the present invention proposes coloring the top surface of the resinous plastic material upon completion of its solidification in a manner to produce a completed flame structure which will have a more realistic appearance when illuminated.

Another object of the present invention proposes positioning rods of resinous plastic material between the adjacent faces of the logs in a manner to become embedded in the resinous plastic flame material to, assist the same in bending the light rays about the sides of the logs.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a method of constructing an imitation flame for use in fireplaces and other places which is simple and durable and which may be easily Fig. 3 is a perspective view of a modified form of imitation flame constructed in accordance with the method of the present invention.

Fig. 4 is a front elevational view of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged vertical sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a vertical sectional view similar to Fig. 5, but illustrating an imitation flane constructed in accordance with a further modification of the method of the present invention.

Fig. 7 is a horizontal sectional view taken on the line 'l'l of Fig. 6.

The imitation flame, according to theform of the invention illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawings, includes three logs [0, H and 12 ar-.

ranged pyramid fashion with a space I3 between the adjacent sides of the two lowermost logs l0 and I2. These logs [0, II and I2 might be actual wooden logs cut to the proper length or may be fashioned of a ceramic material or artificially made of any other desired material.

The logs Ill, II and I 2 are joined together in a novel manner by a synthetic resin material [4 fashioned to resemble flames. The assembled construction is adapted to be rested on a base l5, shown in dot and dash lines in Fig. 2, and the base I5 is preferably provided with a source of light l6; such as an electric light bulb, extended into the space I3 between the logs l0 and I2.

The synthetic resin material I4 is preferably the methyl methacrylate polymer or copolymer commercially known as Lucite or Plexiglas; however, it may be any of the other known synthetic plastic materials having the ability to bend light rays without the rays passing through the side walls of the curved synthetic resin material.

The resin material It is so applied that it has an end portion 14 directed toward the light source is between the adjacent sides of the logs H and I2 and a second end portion M directed toward the light source beneath the log [0. These end portions of the synthetic resin material M are adapted to receive the light rays from the light source It and convey them about the sides of the logs and illuminate the entire synthetic resin material flame formation.

In formingthe imitation flame, the logs Ill, I I and [2 are arranged in pyramid fashion and the synthetic resin material I4 is poured over the 'logs in a liquid or semi-liquid state.

The logs are then inverted and while the liquid synthetic resin material is solidifying it is allowed to drip from the mass thereof forming the desired flame tips. If desired, the formation of the flame tips may be aided by manually shaping the synthetic resin material just prior to the time that it becomes entirely solidified, but this is not absolutely essential, as desirable flame tips have been formed by the dripping resin material without manual formation.

It has been found that the appearance of the completed imitation flame can be greatly enhanced by coloring the surface of the solidified synthetic material [4 so as to provide an interesting and attractive illusionary pattern.

In the modification of the invention shown in Figs. 3 to 5, the construction of the imitation flame is similar to that previously described, except that the synthetic resin material M has a third end portion l4 directed toward the light source l6 between the adjacent sides of the logs l9 and H. This additional end portion [4 aids in illuminating the interior of the flame-like formation.

In other respects this form of the invention is similarto that previously described and like reference numerals identify like parts in .each of the several views.

.In themodification of the invention shown in Figs. 6 and 7, the construction of the imitation flame is similar to that illustrated inFigs. 3 to '5, except that the synthetic resin material I4" has its end portion Me, between .the logs H and i2, and its-end portion I l between the logs 110 and I l provided with curved rods .l'! of synthetic resin :of the synthetic resin material M" or may be pressed into the synthetic resin material 14" while still in asemi-solid state.

In other respects this latter form .of the in- =vention is similar to that shown in Figs. 3 to 5 and like reference numerals identify like parts in the-several views.

In addition to methyl methacrylate other substances which have been found suitable for the .formation of the flame or the rods 11 in the form of the invention disclosedin Figs. 6 and '7, are ethyl cellulose, polyethylene, vinylidene chloride,

any transparent plastic celluloid or any other U transparent organic or inorganic polymer.w

.From the foregoing description it .is apparent that .a very attractive product producing the de- :sired effect can be readily made in accordance with this invention, and that the resulting product is inexpensive and can be made with a minimum expenditure of time and effort from relatively "inexpensive and readily available machinery and raw materials.

While we have illustrated and described-the preferred embodiments of our invention, it is to be understood that we do not limit ourselves to the precise constructions herein disclosed and the right is reserved to all changes and modifications coming within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim as new, and desire to secure by United States LettersPatent is:

.1. A method of making an artificial flame log assembly, which consists in arranging a plurality of logs pyramid fashion, leaving a space between the adjacent sides of the lowermost logs for a source of light, applying a synthetic resin mate- These rods l! are curved to extend plane of the round cross-section of the logs 4 rial "to the logs in a liquid or semi-liquid state, in-' verting the logs and alldwing the synthetic resin material to drip therefrom while solidifying to form flame tips, and coloring the surface of the solidified synthetic resin material.

'2. A method of making an artificial flame log assembly, which consists in arranging a plurality of .logs pyramid fashion, leaving a space between the adjacent sides of the lowermost logs for a source of light, applying a synthetic resin material to the logs in a liquid or semi-liquid state, inverting the logs so that the synthetic resin material will drop therefrom while solidifying to form flame tips, and coloring the surface of the solidified synthetic resin material, and shaping theflame tips manually while the synthetic resin material is solidifying. 3. .A method of making an artificial flame 10g assembly, which consists in covering a log structure with a viscous liquid material, bringing said liquid material into an almost rigid plastic state while it is slowly dripping from said log structure, andforming the material remaining on said log structure to make it even more flame-like in shape.

4. A method of making an artificial jfiame log assembly, which consists in covering a log structure with a viscous liquid material, bringing said liquid material into an almost rigid plastic state while .it is slowly dripping from said log structure, forming the material remaining on said log structure to make it even more flame-like in shape, and covering-said shaped structure with coloring matter to give it flame coloring.

5. A method of making an artificial flame leg assembly, which consists in covering a log structure with a viscous'liquid material, bringing said liquid material into an almost rigid plastic state while it is slowly dripping fromsaid log structure, and forming the material remaining on said log structure to make .it even more flame-like in .shape,..and.interspersing rods of synthetic plastic .material into the main body of plastic material.

6. A method of making an artificial flame log assembly, which consists in covering a log structure-with .a viscous liquid material, bringing said liquid material .into an almost rigid plastic state .while it is slowly dripping fromsaid log structure, and forming the material remaining on said .log structure to make it even more flame-like in shape, and interspersing rods of synthetic plastic material into the main body of plastic material, .the length of said rods being parallel to .the .m

saidstructure.

- PHIILIP MUNAO.

CARMELO C. MUN-A0.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file ofthis patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 310,441 Kellerman .Jan. 6, 1885 1,428,940 .Brinker Sept. 12, 1922 1,432,942 Zei Oct. 24, 1922 1,827,941 Gross Oct. 20, 1931 2,316,589 Iwanowicz Apr. 13, 1943 2,448,906 Munao Sept. 7, 1948 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date "480,098 Great Britain Feb. .16, 1938

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US310441 *Sep 20, 1884Jan 6, 1885 Manufacture of wire coated articles
US1428940 *Jul 20, 1921Sep 12, 1922Standard Oil CoOrnamented candle
US1432942 *Jun 21, 1922Oct 24, 1922Clara SchneiderLuminous log
US1827941 *Apr 6, 1928Oct 20, 1931Gross Henry JohnElectric log
US2316589 *Apr 21, 1942Apr 13, 1943Stanley IwanowiczLamp or illuminated ornament
US2448906 *May 15, 1946Sep 7, 1948Munao PhilipArtificial flame
GB480098A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2789690 *Jun 13, 1951Apr 23, 1957David E SimpsonSupport for icicles or foil trimming and method of using the same for trimming christmas tree
US3405215 *Oct 16, 1964Oct 8, 1968Phillips Petroleum CoMethod of producing thermoplastic ornaments
US4021908 *Oct 23, 1975May 10, 1977Mildred ShulmanMethod of sculpturing with plastic material
US6383421 *Nov 22, 2000May 7, 2002L. Myles PhippsMethod of manufacturing a gas burning artificial log from sol-gel compositions
Classifications
U.S. Classification264/279, 264/294, 427/445, 264/263, 264/301, 428/15, 427/331
International ClassificationG09F19/00, G09F19/10, F24C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF24C3/006, G09F19/10
European ClassificationF24C3/00A2, G09F19/10