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Publication numberUS2544769 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 13, 1951
Filing dateDec 29, 1945
Priority dateDec 29, 1945
Publication numberUS 2544769 A, US 2544769A, US-A-2544769, US2544769 A, US2544769A
InventorsCharles Rietdyke, Sperry Roger S
Original AssigneeScovill Manufacturing Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fume and vapor control for cleansing tanks
US 2544769 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 1951 R. s. SPERRY ET AL 2,544,769

FUME AND VAPOR CONTROL FOR CLEANSING TANKS Filed Dec. 29, 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 \O INVENTOR5 Roger $.Sperry a flharleslhefdyhe l BY 52 51 42 5O ATTORNE March 13, 1951 R. s. SPERRY ET AL FUME AND VAPOR CONTROL FOR CLEANSING TANKS Filed Dec. 29, 1945 '2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS Roger 5. Sperr- Charles U Rletdyke ATTOR Y Patented Mar. 13, 1951 FUME AND VAPOR CONTROL FOR CLEANSING TANKS Roger S. Sperry and. Charles Rietdyke, Waterbury,

Conn.,

assignors to Scovill Manufacturing Company, WaterburypConn a corporation of Connecticut Application December 29, 1945, Serial No. 638,290

11 Claims.

This invention relates to tanks for use in cleansing,'processing or treating parts or materials of various kinds and classes, particularly wherein fumes or vapors rise from the tanks in the use thereof. More particularly, the invention deals with a tank construction having means for controlling the fumes and vapors so as to maintain the same against exhaust discharge from the upper surface of the tank, and to exhaust the fumes and vapors in order to prevent objectionable and harmful fumes and vapors from coming in contact with operators working in conjunction with the tanks. Still more particularly, the invention comprises an apparatus including means. for filtering air circulated thereby to substantially filter and purify re-circulated air in remov- 2 of approximately twenty to thirty degrees to the horizontal over the top of the tank, so as to form above the tank a relatively large chamber in which the fumes and vapors are substantially housed and drawn by the blast of air into the exhaust means employed. Further in creating in the blower or exhaust hood, a suction drawing the fumes and vapors into the hood and discharging ing foreign or objectionable elements therefrom.

The novel features of the invention will be best understood from the following description when taken together with, the accompanying drawing in which certain embodiments of the invention are disclosed, and in which the separate parts are designated by suitable reference characters in each of the views, and in which:

Fig. 1 is a front view of a tank unit made according to the invention.

Fig. 2 is a side view of the structure shown in Fig. 1, with part of the construction broken away and in section. I

Fig. 3 is a section on the line'3-3 of Fig. 1, on an enlarged scale, and with parts of the structure broken away.

Fig. 4 is a partial section on the line 44 of Fig. 1, on an enlarged scale.

Fig. 5 is a partial section on the line 5-5 of Fig. 3; and

Fig. 6 is an enlarged sectional detailed view of a modified form of exhaust.

In tanks or apparatu of the kind under consideration, attempts have been made to control or guard against the escape of fumes and vapors arising from treatment or processing tanks of the kind under consideration, particularly when such tanks employ chemicals giving off objectionable or obnoxious odors or injurious fumes or vapors, but for the most part, apparatus of this kind have not proved to be practical or successful in accomplishing the desired result. This has been largely due to the fact that the direction of air currents or the blasts of air passed over the tank have not efficiently exhausted the fumes or vapors rising from the tank.

With our present construction, we have shown .rneans for discharging a blast of air at an angle them through the exhaust duct or passage down the back and acros the bottom of the tank, and then in providing the jet or nozzle-like discharge at the upper end of the front of the tank. In some installations of this type and kind, it is also desirable to filter the exhaust air of the unit in order to maintain a more eflicient operation thereof and to prevent re-circulation of contaminated air, which would be objectionable to the operators, particularly from the standpoint of any slight escape which may occur in vapors or fumes rising fromthe angular air blast over the top of the tank. I

In the drawing, It] represents the tank of a unit in which a suitable cleansing or processing fluid l l is arranged, and at I2 is shown the upper open end of the tank. The tank is mounted on spaced supports 13 and I4 in the form of beams arranged over a floor or other surface, and on the beams is usually arranged an openwork flooring, as for example at I5, note Fig. 2, and also partly shown in Fig. 3.

Arranged at the upper rear portion of the tank, and supported in suitable side brackets Hi and I1, secured to the tank, as seen at l8, note Fig. 1, is a hood [9. The hood has an upper substantially cylindrical portion 28 divided by two blower compartments 2| and 22 which divide or partition the hood into three exhaust passages, namely two side passages 23 and 24, and a center passage 25. Extending through the cylindrical hood 20 is a shaft 26 having suitable bearings in the brackets l 6 and IT, as at 21 and 28. Supported on the top of the brackets is a table'or platform 29 upon which is supported an electric motor 30 and from this motor is a belt or chain drive 3| to the shaft 25, as clearly appearing in Fig. 1 of the drawing.

Mounted on the shaft 26, within the compartments 2| and 22, are fans 32 and 33, preferably of the squirrel-cage type, that is to say, the fans comprise a plurality of circumferentially spaced blades 34 extending radially from a hub portion 35 and preferably joined at their side peripheral edges in rings 36. As each fan is of the same construction, the brief description of one will apply to both.

The compartment 2| has openings 31-31' in side walls thereof, concentric to the fan 32 and of diameters substantially common to the inside diameters of the rings 35 on the fan 32. The compartment 22 has similar openings 38-38 registering with the fan 33. Allof the openings, 31-41 and 38-38 are bounded by inwardly. flared walls, as een at 39, to direct the air drawn into the openings 23, 24 and 25 into the fans, and then to discharge the same downwardly through the discharge ends 2| and 22 ofthe compartments 2i and 22, which open into the upper end of a rear flue or duct 40. The; duct 40 extends: downwardly over the back 41 of the tank I0, and then extends forwardly as a bottom duct or flue 42 across the bottom of the tank. The flue 42 communicates at its forward end' in an upwardly ex,- tending and laterally flared duct 43. The duct 43 terminating at its upper end in an inwardly and upwardly directed elongated discharge nozzle 44, which extends substantially the full length of the front wall 45:01 the: tank, aswill appear from a consideration of Fig. 1 of the drawing.

It will. be apparent from. the foregoing that in the operation of the. fans 32 and 33, air will be drawn from thetop. of the tank and discharged. downwardly. through. the duct 40 across the bottom duct 42, then: passed upwardly through. the duct 43 and discharged under pressure from the nozzle discharge 4.4 toform. a blast column of air substantially as-indi'cated: by. the arrows 46,.nte. Fig. 3", which. blastof air-is directed tothe lowerfront portion of the. cylindrical part 26. of the. hood so astofreely passinto the intake passages:

23, 2'4. and 25, and be assisted: in this operation by the suction. created by the. fans; 32. and 33;. which will tend to. draw the, air into, the compartments 2i. and.22, andthento recirculate the air through the ducts,.as above. described.

In Fig. 2 of. the drawing,.a suitable filter 4.1 is shown arranged in the duct 48 and removable through. onesideloi.theductthrough the me ium of a nozzle plate- 48. haying a. handle; as at 9... The, filterwill extend; entirely across the; duct 4}) to filter the. air in its passage through the duct, The lower-wall of the-duct 4:2;has, adrain passage. 59 for the discharge of, condensation. which may collect in said; lower. duct,

It is alsopreferred that an exhaust passage'il be provided where the duct 42 joins the duct 43, the exhaust 51 being preferably. arranged inthe outer wall of the duct 43, at the lower end there-. of. This exhaust is controlled by a hinge cover. 52, carrying a gravity actuatedcatch 53 for sup-. porting the cover 52 indifferent positions of adjustment so. that the degree. of opening of the exhaust can be controlled to maintain. the required balance in circulation or recirculation of air.. It will, be understood that the blast of air as at 4.6, will pick up. and carry with it air from the room or compartment in which the. unit is arranged, resulting in a build-up of air, which will require an exhaust, as at 51, to avoid building-up of excessive pressure. The cover 52 will have suitable handle members 54 facilitating movement thereof. into open and closed positions.

It will be. noted upon consideration of Fig. 5 of the drawing, that the top platform 29 of the brackets is and I1 includes acenter depending bearing member 55 for the shaft 26 to support saidshaft intermediate the two fans.

In Fig. 6) of the drawing is shown a modification, and in this figure; 43 represents the lower part of the front wall of the duct 43, such as shown in Fig. 3 of the drawing, having an opening 5! therein, similar to the opening 5|. With this construction, an exhaust tube 56 forms an extension for the opening 5i. The outer open end of the tube '56 is controlled by a hinge cover 52 similar to the cover 52, and having a latch 53. similar to the latch 53. The elongated tube Ed is. made: sufiiciently long, to provide av support for a filter unit 51 insertable into the tube from the top thereof through a medium of a handle 58 on said, unit. The unit is suitably guided by cleats, as at 59, arranged in side walls of the tube to maintain the same in predetermined position within the; tube.- passage 69. The filter unit 51 Willi be of an open frame construction in which filter pads or sections such as 6| are arranged for filtering theair exhausted through the exhaust, passage 69. This filter pad may be used independently or in conjunction with the filter 41, and provides a further means for filtering the air, which would be discharged into the room at the lower forward end portion offtheunit' and below the open-work flooring. as for example at 9'5; inF-igs. 2' and 3.

By making both ofthezfil tersavil; and 51. readily detachable, they can be removed for replacement. and cleaning: from time: to time. employed wilt preferably be. of a type and. kind not to materially interfere: with air. flow of. the apparatus and; be constructed-'- to suit the type and kinds of; fluids. employed in the tank, or the fumes. or vapors; rising therefrom.

It will: alsov appear from. a. consideration of Figs. 1 and 210i the drawing that the upper hood portion at the. unit. can readily be. removed by simply. detaching the bolts. t8? andhandle members 82, which are provided at.v opposite sides of the. hood portion. of the: unit. to. facilitate handling of thesame.

Considering Fig 3: of. the drawing, it: will appear that the hood? t9; includes a supplemental curved back wall 63. which has cut-outs therein for receiving. the compartments. 2i and 22, including the: tubularconduit: portions. 2 t" and 22' thereof. This wall' operates-to: direct theair into the; upper portion. of the hood;

Considering now Figs and k of-the: drawing, it. will further appear; that the, upper end of the ccmnartments; Off the; front; wall. portions. thereof have curved walls 64 and 65 respectiyely; which seat on, and; substantiallyrconform with. the hood 2|], completing; the. lower, portion. of said, hood. Noting Fig. 4 particularly, it will appear that the wall. portions,. as for examplezat, 651,. are arranged in a closer proximity. to. the; periphery of the fanthanthe remaining-wall portionsof. the hood 2B which gradually increases in diameter to the upper portion. of the fan, forming arelatively larger discharge at the rear portion of. the compartments. which open into. the downwardly directed tubular. discharges 2| and- 22 opening into, the duct 4.0

It. will be apparent, from a. consideration of Figs. 1 and Z of. the. drawing, that the air circulated through theducts, is materially restricted in. the. ductv 43,, which. is narrower, but. slightly wider than the duct 42., and. terminates, in a restricted discharge inthe. nozzle. 44. in producing the required blast pressure di charge. over the top of the tank.

Having fully describedour invention, what we claim as new and desire. to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In treatment tanks. of the. character described, a fume and vapor control. apparatus,

said apparatus comprising a tank, a hood mount- The. filtersed on and extending over the full length of and in vertical spaced relation to the rear end portion of said tank, said hood having side walls, spaced blower compartments within the hood and spaced from said side walls, said hood having passages between said compartments and the compartments and said side walls, said passages being exposed to the upper open end of the tank forwardly of the back thereof, said compartments having conduits directed downwardly at the rear portion of the hood and the back of the tank, a duct communicating with said conduits and extending downwardly along the back, across the bottom and upwardly at the front of the tank, the upper front end of said duct having a contracted discharge nozzle extending over the full length of the upper front edge of the tank and in an upwardly inclined direction, said nozzle being adapted to direct air discharged therefrom in an upwardly and rearwardly inclined path over the top of the tank and to the passages of said hood, said compartments having openings communicating with the passages of said hood, a fan within said compartments and means for driving the fan for drawing air into the hood passages and forcibly discharging the same therefrom into said duct and out through said discharge nozzle.

'2. A fume and vapor control apparatus for tanks of the class described, said apparatus comprising a tank, a hood of a length substantially equal to the length of the back wall of said tank, means for mounting the hood in spaced relation to and above the tank at and forward 1y of said back wall, a shaft extending longitudinally through the hood, a pair of fans on said shaft spaced with respect to each other and to the ends of said hood, blower compartments in said hood and around said fans, said blower compartments dividing said hood into longitudinally spaced air admission passages, said compartments having openings placing said air admission passages in communication with the interior of said compartments, means for rotating said shaft to drive said fans to draw air into the blower compartments, said compartments having downwardly directed tubular conduits rearwardly of said back wall, a duct communicating with said conduits and extending downwardly over said back wall of the tank, across the bottom wall thereof and upwardly over the front wall, and the upper ront end of said duct having an inwardly directed upwardly inclined discharge nozzle extending the full length of the tank for directing air upwardly and rearwardly over the top of the tank to the admission passages of said hood.

3. A fume and vapor control apparatus for tanks of the class described, said apparatus comprising a tank, a hood of a length substantially equal to the length of the back wall of said tank, means for mounting the hood in spaced relation to and above the tank at and forwardly of said back wall, a shaft extending longitudinally through the hood, a pair of fans on said shaft spaced with respect to each other and to the ends of said hood, blower compartments in said hood and around said fans, said blower compartments dividing said hood into longitudinally spaced air admission passages, said compartments having openings placing said air admission passages in communication with the interior of said compartments, means for rotating said shaft to drive said fans to draw air into the blower compartments, said compartments having downwardly and rearwardly over the top of the tank to the directed tubular conduits rearwardly of said back wall, a duct communicating with said conduits and extending downwardly over said back wall of the tank, across the bottom wall thereof and upwardly over the front wall, the upper front end of said duct having an inwardly directed upwardly inclined discharge nozzle extending the full length of the tank for directing air upwardly and rearwardly over the top ofthe tank to the admission passages of said hood, and adjustable means in said duct controlling discharge of part of the air circulated therethrough.

4. A fume and vapor control apparatus for tanks of the class described, said apparatus comprising a tank, a hood of a length substantially equal to the length of the back wall of said tank,

means for mounting the hood in spaced relation to and above the tank at and forwardly of said back wall, a shaft extending longitudinally through the hood, a pair of fans on said shaft spaced with respect to each other and to the ends of said hood, blower compartments in said hood and around said fans, said blower compartments dividing said hood into longitudinally spaced air admission passages, said compartments having openings placing said air admission passages in communication with the interior of said compartments, means for rotating said shaft to drive said fans to draw air into the blower compartments, said compartments having downwardly directed tubular conduits rearwardly of said back wall, a duct communicating with said conduits and extending downwardly over said back wall of the tank, across the bottom wall thereof and upwardly over the front wall, the upper front end of said duct having an inwardly directed upwardly inclined discharge nozzle extending the full length of the tank for directing air upwardly and rearwardly over the top of the tank to the admission passages of said hood, means for filtering air passed through said duct, and said last named means comprising a filter element detachably supported in the duct at the back of the tank.

5. A fume and vapor control apparatus for tanks of the class described, said apparatus cornadmission passages, said compartments having openings placing said air admission passages in communication with the interior of said compartments, means for rotating said shaft to drive said fans to draw air into the blower compartments, said compartments having downwardly directed tubular conduits rearwardly of said back wall, a duct communicating with said conduits and extending downwardly over said back wall of the tank, across the bottom wall thereof and upwardly over the front wall, the upper front end of said duct having an inwardly directed upwardly inclined discharge nozzle extending the full length of the tank for directing air upwardly admission passages of said hood, adjustable 'means in said duct controlling discharge of part discharged from; said duct, and means in. the:-

,backv part of said duct for filtering air passed.

through said; duct.

6.. The herein described means for controllingfumes and vapors rising from a. treatment tank of. the. class; described, said means comprising. a tank, an air circulating apparatus for said. tank, said. apparatus having. an elongated discharge nozzle above and extending longitudinally of the front wall. of: the tank to be controlled, said discharge nozzle being directed. rearwardly and: up-- wardly over the topof. the. tank, a. hood arranged over and; above the; full length of the: rear. portion. or the tank, means; comprising. a blower Within the: hood. and; a. duct communicating. with the hood and extending aroundv the. back, bottom and: frontwalls of: thetank for providing a forced circulation of air through the; apparatus for discharge, from. said nozzle in an upwardly inclined rearward direction; over and above. the top of the. tank, and. said hood. havin means at the. rear portion of. the tank for collecting the air including. fumes and vapors rising from the tank for: circulation. by said. forced circulation. means through theapparatus.

7'. The herein. described means for controlling fumes and vapors rising" fromv a; treatment tank of the class described, said means comprising atank, an aircirculating; apparatus for said tank, said apparatus; having an elongated discharge nozzle above; and; extending longitudinally of the front wall of. the. tank to be controlled, said discharge nozzle being directed rearwardlv and upwardly over. the; top' of. the; tank, a hood arranged over and above the. full length. of the rear portion oi 1 the-tank, means comprising a. blower within the hood. and a duct communicating. with the hood and extending around the back, bottom and front walls of the tank for providin a forced circulation of air. through the apparatus for discharge from said nozzle in an upwardly inclined rear:- ward: direction over and above. the top of the tank, said hood. having means at the rearportion of the tank for collecting the air including fumes and vapors rising from the tank. for cir culation by said forced circulationmeans; through.

the apparatus, and thebottom portion of the duct having a controlled: airroutlet.

8; The herein described means, for; controlling: fumes: and vapors rising from. a treatment tank ofthe class; described-,said means comprising a tank, an air circulating apparatus for said tank;.

said. apparatus, having: an elongated, discharge:

nozzle above and extending: longitudinally of thefront wall of the tank to-be controlled, saidl discharge nozzle being directed. rearwardlyand"- up;- wardly over the topof the tank, a hood arranged,

over and above the; full length of the rear por-- tion of the tank, means comprising a blowerwithin the hood and a duct communicating withthe hood and extending around-the back, bottom and front walls of, the tank for providing a forced circulation of air through the: apparatus; for: dis? charge from said; nozzle. in an upwardly inclined.-

rearward direction over. and: above thetop: of the; tank, said hood having means at therear-portion fumes: and vapors rising from a. treatment tank of the class. described, said means comprising a.

tank; an air circulating apparatus: for-said tank, said apparatus having an elongated discharge nozzle above and. extending longitudinally of the frontwall of. the: tank to be controlled, said discharge. nozzle being: directed. rearwardly and upwardlv over the. top of the tank, a hood arranged over and above the iulllength of. the rear portion of the tank, means. comprising. a; blower within the hood and a. duct communicating with the hood and extending". around the. back; bottom. and front walls of: the; tank: for providing, a. forced circulation of air'through: the: apparatus. for discharge. from said nozzle: in: an upwardly inclined controlling, fumes and vapors rising, from the tank, said means comprising a hood. arranged over and. above the full length of the rear portion: of: the' tank, an; upwardly inclined discharge nozzle arranged over the fullilength of the front portion of, the tank, means including a duct for placing said hood: in communication. with said nozzle, and: means within the hood providing a forced. circulation-of. air through the duct tosaid nozzle: for discharge in an upwardly and rearwardly; inclined column over and; above the tank into said hood.

11.. The combination with a treatment tank of the character described, of. means for. housing. and. controlling; fumes and vapors rising. from the tank, said means comprising a hood arranged over and above the full length of the rear portion of the: tank, an upwardly inclined. discharge nozzle arranged: over the full length of the front portion of. the tank, means including a duct forplacing.

saidhood. in. communication with. said: nozzle, means within the. hood providing a. forced circulation of air-through; the. duct to said nozzle for dischargeinanupwardlv and rearwardly inclined column over and above the tank. into said hood, means for purifying the air. circulated through said duct, andadjustable means in said duct controlling exhaust of part of said circulated air at a point) spaced with. respect to said. nozzle.

ROGER S. SPERRY. CHARLES RIETDYKE.

REFERENCES, CITED The following references: areof record in. the file of this patent:

UNITED STIL YlIl-BS PATENTS Number Name Date 1,254,725 Pennock Jan. 29, 1918 1,539,973 Truxal June 2, 1925 1,338,641 Cowan l Dec. 10, 1929 2,074,317 Allan eta-1; Mar. 23, 1937. 2,251,516 Roche; Jr., etal. Sept. 30, 1941 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 491,033 Great Britain Aug. 25', I938

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3121618 *Jun 14, 1961Feb 18, 1964Felix L YerzleyHood and air scrubber
US3386365 *Jan 16, 1967Jun 4, 1968Donald D. JensenApparatus and method for producing a fog curtain heat shield
US4801262 *Dec 11, 1987Jan 31, 1989Haden Schweitzer CorporationLow velocity air seal
US5042456 *May 30, 1990Aug 27, 1991Cameron CoteAir canopy ventilation system
US5251608 *Jul 22, 1991Oct 12, 1993Cameron CoteAir canopy ventilation system
US5338248 *Jan 25, 1993Aug 16, 1994Midwest Air Products Co., Inc.Ventilation apparatus for removing vapors
US5362274 *Oct 31, 1990Nov 8, 1994Aigo SeiichiroBlowing port for clean air of an apparatus for washing semiconductor materials
Classifications
U.S. Classification454/66
International ClassificationC23G3/00, D06F43/00, F24F9/00
Cooperative ClassificationC23G3/00, D06F43/00, F24F9/00
European ClassificationF24F9/00, C23G3/00, D06F43/00