Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2546408 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 27, 1951
Filing dateMar 7, 1950
Priority dateMar 7, 1950
Publication numberUS 2546408 A, US 2546408A, US-A-2546408, US2546408 A, US2546408A
InventorsFlorida L Riggs
Original AssigneeFlorida L Riggs
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insole-type appliance
US 2546408 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 27, 1951- F. L. mess INSOLE-TYPE APPLIANCE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 7, 1950 INVENTOR. I FLORIDA L. RIGGS 7 ATTPRNEY arch 27, 1951 F. L. mess 2 546 4$ INSOLE-IYPE APPLIANCE Filed March 7, 1950 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. FLORIDA L. RIGGS ATTORNEY Patented Mar. 27, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE INSOLE-TYPE APPLIANCE Florida L. Riggs, Gilcrest, 0010.

Application. March 7, 1950, SerialNo. 148,100

8 Claims. 1

This invention relates to corrective and therapeutic appliances. of insole type adapted for wear to restore the natural attitude of the human foot and to thereby facilitate the normal and natural wholesome functioning of the circulatory and nervous systems serving the foot, and has as an object to provide an improved such appliance.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved corrective and therapeutic appliance of insole type characterized by novelty of structure and arrangement effective in use to restore the natural attitude, function, and relationship of the foot constituent elements.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved corrective and therapeutic appliance of insole type effective to support and strengthen the normal load-bearing arches of the foot.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved corrective and therapeutic appliance of insole type conducive to normal foot attitudes and dispositions permissive of proper natural functioning of the circulatory and nervous systerns serving the foot.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved corrective therapeutic appliance of insole type susceptible of particular exact adaptations to use with a given human. foot for maximum beneficial effect.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved corrective and therapeuticappliance of insole type susceptible of wear association with conventional shoes.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved corrective and therapeutic appliance, of insole type adapted for simple, inexpensive production from readily available materials. in a variety of appropriate sizes, that is convenient and simple of adaptation to effective use in a given situation, and that functions in use to stimulate operation of the normal and natural fac tors conductive to comfort and health.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, my invention consists in the construction, arrangement, and combination of elements as hereinafter set forth, pointed out inmy claims and illustrated by the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a plan view of a typical embodiment of the invention as positioned for use in underlying relation with a dorsal diagram of the bones comprising a human left foot. Figure 2 is a plan view of the embodiment of the improvement represented in Figure 1. Figure 3 is a cross section taken on the indicated line 3-3 of Figure 2. Figure 4 is a cross section taken on the indicated line 4-4 of Figure 2. Figure 5 is a cross section taken on the indicated line 5-5 of Figure 2. Figure 6 is a cross section taken on the indicated line B6 of Figure 2. Figure 7 is a cross section taken on the indicated line l'!- of Figure 2. Figure 8 is, a cross section taken on. the indicated line 8-8 of Figure 2.

As represented by the skeletal diagram of Figurev 1, the human. foot includes a load-bearing, articulated arrangement comprising the phalanges [0, the metatarsal bones II, the internal, middle, and external cuneiform bones indicatedrespectively at I2, I3 and I4, the scaphoid bone IS, the cuboid bone 16, the astragalus bone 11, and the os calcis bone l8, in the general arrangement and interassociation shown. The great toe of the foot is constituted from and served by two phalanx elements l0- while the remaining toes of the foot are in each instance constituted from and served by three phalanx elements It], and the metatarsal bones l l are designated in numerical. succession in a rising order from the inner and to the outer margin of the foot, the bone H in the series serving the great toe being hence thefirst metatarsal bone. The various bones of the foot are engaged and interarticulated to constitute a longitudinal arch extending from heel. to toe with its maximum uprise on the line connecting the heel and great toe, a transverse arch through the cuneiform and cuboid bones, an. anterior metatarsal arch at approxi-- mately the junction of the metatarsal bones H- with the phalanges l0, and a point of load imposition at approximately the junction of the scaphoid, cuboid, astragalus: and 0s calcis bones determined by the relation of the load-transmitting tibia with the astragalus. In natural, proper articulation, the bones of they foot receive the load from the tibia and normally support and balance such load through the agency of the foot arches. with full accommodation of nerves and elements of the circulatory system and the pressures and displacements incident to ambulation. Manifestly, any distortion in the normal interrelation and articulation of the foot bones. is reflected by abnormal and improperly compensated load incidence, by impairment of nerve and circulatory system functioning, and by consequent development of stresses, strains, growths and displacements, with their attendant aches and pains, inimical to normal health and Well being. Modern foot wear, improper habits of posture-and ambulation, and weaknesses inherent in the muscles and ligaments of the foot all contribute to aggravation of initial abnormalities and preclude natural correction thereof,v hence the instant invention is directed to the provision of an appliance employable to urge and maintain the foot bones in natural articulation and proper interrelation conducive to natural cor-rec tion and, rehabilitation of any developed deficiency.

The natural operative conformation of the human foot is such as to substantially align the foot longitudinal arch in and with the direction of normal ambulation and any material variation in such arch line alters the angle and pointof load imposition relative to the foot arches in an undesirable manner, and the. instant improvement is hence designed not only to support and strengthen the foot arches but to urge return of the foot attitude to normal, all without limitation or impairment of circulatory and nerve system functioning.

In any of its practical embodiments the improvement takes the form of a generally flat, relatively thin, preferably flexible unit fabricated from appropriate material in a size and outline adapted for insertion as an insoIewithin and in directly overlying relation against the inner face of a conventional shoe sole, said units hence being supplied in complementary pairs whereof the elements are adapted for use in shoes of right and left foot characteristics. In its general form and construction, the improved insole unit is analogous to devices commonly and presently available, and differs from conventional insole appliances primaril in the form, construction,

and arrangement of support elements associated with the insole for corrective purposes.

In the illustrated embodiment of the invention, the numeral I9 designates an insole unit sized and contoured for reception within a conventional left shoe, said unit comprising a double thickness of relatively thin, flexiblematerial, such as leather or the equivalent, whereof the adjacent ply surfaces are interbonded or adhered throughout the major extent of their areas. A very common foot condition requiring correction being a tendency to toe outward or to tilt the foot laterally in an outward direction, a corrective strip 28 of resiliently-yieldable material, such as sponge rubber, is associated with and fixed along the outer margin of the unit I9, preferably between the plies of material forming said unit, in a thickness effective to elevate the outer side of the foot and tilt the foot transverse arches inward; such tilting of the foot transverse arches tending to induce a straight line attitude of the foot and to restore the arches to proper supporting relation with the load. As is clearly shown in the drawings, the strip 26 is contoured into conformity with the unit I9 outer margin, is of variable width inward of the unit to define a particularly contoured strip inner margin, and

is laterally inclined or sloped inwardly of the unit 7 curved inwardly, rearwardly, and then outwardly v of the unit I9 to provide a laterally and inwardly sloped elevated area 2| disposed to underlie, elevate, and support the phalanges II] of the fourth and fifth toes and to enhance the lateral support provided by said toes in a manner conducive to maintenance of the foot in. straight line walking attitude. Rearwardly from the strip area ii, the strip inner margin is converged slightly toward the unit I9 outer margin and intoa reduced spacing with the latter disposed in outward clearing adjacency with the joint between the fifth toe phalanges IE5 and the fifth metatarsal bone II of the foot, thereby relieving said joint of any direct elevation deriving from the strip 20 and yet supporting and inducing elevation of the foot outer margin adjacent said joint. Just rearwardly of the strip 20 reduced width area above defined, said strip is curved and widened inwardly of the unit IE}, as at 22, to establish a maximum width area 23 disposed to underlie, elevate and support the metatarsal bones II of the foot in engaging conformity with the transverse foot arch therefrom constituted and in a-man- 4 V I ner supplementing and enhancing the effect of the strip area 2I as above described. The area 23 bridges substantially across the unit I9 as a tapered projection from the strip 20 whereof the anterior and posterior margins are oppositely sloped or inclined to merge into the unit I9 plane, and said area 23 is contoured in section from coincidence with the strip 20 thickness at the unit outer margin to a maximum thickness defining an elevated boss 23' at the crown of the corresponding foot transverse arch, approximately beneath the second metatarsal bone I I, and thence to mergence with the unit I9 plane adjacent the unit inner margin. Rearwardly from said area of maximum width 23, the strip 20 inner margin is contoured from a narrow strip width at the root of the area 23 in substantial clearance with the fifth metatarsal II to an expanded strip width at the junction of the cuboid bone I6 and the os calcis I8 underlying outward margins of said members, and is then gradually tapered in width rearwardly of the unit I9 to a minimum width 24 adjacent and outwardly clearing the rearward outer margin of the os calcis I8. In a gradually increased width, the strip 20 is extended about and in inward adjacency with the heel outline of the unit I9, as indicated at 25, and terminates in an outwardly curved extension 26 along the inner margin of the unit in engagement beneath the scaphoid bone I5, thus defining a shallow cup between the strip portions 24 and 25 for accommodation of the 0s calcis I8. The strip 20 is preferably of uniform thickness throughout its variable width length and from its initial area 2| to its terminal point 26, save for the increased thickness of the area 23 above set forth, and the inner margin of said strip is sloped and inclined, as above described, throughout its entire contoured line, except at that area of increased width underlying the junction of the cuboid bone and 0s calcis and the extension 26 margin thereto opposed, to obviate an abrupt shoulders or corners where the strip engages the foot and to thereby enhance wearer comfort. As is readily apparent, the inner margin contour of the strip 20 in its forward portion provides for foot engagement in a manner to minimize any tendency of the foot to slip or move forwardly relative to the unit I9, since engagement of the strip portion 2| beneath the fourth and fifth toe phalanges, engagement of the strip area 23 with and beneath the natural transverse arch of the metatarsals, and accommodation of the fourth and fifth metatarsal forward end joints between said strip widened areas function through load-imposed pressure of the foot against the unit to largely inhibit relative displacement.

Completing the improved appliance for practical use, a domed boss 2'! of resiliently-yieldable material, such as sponge rubber, is associated with the unit I9, preferably between the material plies of the latter, with its convex surface directed upwardly from the plane of the unit to correspond with the strip 20 mounted thereon and in position to engage beneath and support the common intersection or junction of the scaphoid bone I5, cuboid bone I6, astragalus I1 and 0s calcis I8 of the foot, in laterally bridging relation between and to close marginally against opposed, unslopedinner margins of the strip 20. While the boss 21 is fixed to the unit l9 when the appliance is in use, it is desirable that said boss be initially susceptible of adjustment relative to the unit to assure registration of said boss in proper relation with the foot bones as above set forth. Manifestly, initial adjustability of the boss 2'5 may be accommodated in various ways, and since the boss is fixed relative to the unit during use of the appliance it is so illustrated in the drawings. The boss 2'! has a dimension outstanding above the major plane of the unit It a distance slightly greater than that represented by'the strip thickness, but it is contemplated that bosses 2? of various maximum thicknesses may be made avaiable for more perfect adaptation of the unit to corrective use with human feet of differing characteristics. In all instances the boss 2'! is preferably circular in plan and of a diameter such as will close against the adjacent strip 28 margins when the boss is fixed in its position of use, it being manifestly feasible, if desired, to extend the strip 23 in its uniform thickness as abridge laterally of the unit beneath. the boss 2"! position and to apply the boss 27 crown, in an appropriate thickness, as an uprise from said bridge. In use of the appliance, the boss 2? engages directly beneath the point of load imposition on the foot and its arches and functions as a fulcrum of yieldable altitude whereon the foot arches may rock, both longitudinally and trans versely of the foot, under the varying loads accommodate by said arches. Engagement of the boss 2? with the foot area above specified fully relieves the elements of the foot circulatory and nerve systems from any boss-imposed pressure which might impair functioning of said systems, thereby supplementing the mechanical corrective support of the foot with a free and unrestricted circulation and nerve reaction conducive to restoration and maintenance of normal foot health.

Constructed and employed as shown and described, the improvement operates in association with either or both feet of an individual to restore and normally correct foot attitudes, to relieve abnormal frictions, stresses, and pressures adversely affecting the foot, and to encourage normal and correct functioning of the systems and muscles serving the foot; the points and areas of interengagement between the appliance and foot being chosen in such anatomical wherein the strip portion marginally coincident correlation with the foot structure as to supplement and assist, rather than to replace normal anatomical and physiological reactions.

Since changes, variations, and modifications in the form, construction, and arrangement of the elements shown and described may be had without departing from the spirit of my invention, I wish to be understood as being limited solely by the scope of the appended claims, rather than by any details of the illustrative showing and foregoing description.

I claim as my invention:

1. An insole-type appliance of the character described, comprising a thin, flexible unit contoured for co-operating accommodation and retention within a shoe in overlying relation with the shoe sole inner face, a cushioning strip of resilient material upstanding from, along, and in marginal coincidence with the outer side and heel outline of said unit, a forward terminal area on said strip disposed for engagement beneath the foot fourth and fifth phalanges, an integral, lateral extension of said strip transversely of the unit disposed for conforming engagement with and beneath the foot metatarsal arch, and a domed boss of resilient material upstanding from said unit in position for registration beneath the joint common to the foot scaphoid, cuboid, astragalus and 0s calcis bones.

with the unit heel outline terminates on the inner side in elevating engagement beneath the foot scaphoid bone, and said strip portion is decreased in thickness inwardly from the unit heel outline to mergence with the unit plane to define a shallow cup for the reception of the foot os calcis.

i. The organization according to claim 1, wherein said strip lateral extension is tapered in plan from a relatively wider base at its junction with the strip adjacent the unit outer side to a relatively narrower tip adjacent the unit inner side, is of non-uniform thickness laterally of the unit to define an upper surface conformably engageable with the foot metatarsal arch and marked by an elevated boss disposed for supporting registration with the crown of said arch, and is marginally tapered to mergence with the unit plane.

5. The organization according to claim 1, wherein said strip, strip forward terminal area, and strip lateral extension are adjacently marginally tapered to mergence with the unit plane in an association definitive of a shallow recess for the reception and accommodation of the fourth and fifth metatarsal end joints.

6. The organization according to claim 1, wherein said domed boss has a dimension outstanding perpendicularly from the unit exceeding the strip thickness adjacent the unit margin.

7. In an insoletype appliance of the character described having a thin, flexible unit contoured for cooperating accommodation and retention Within a shoe in overlying relation with the shoe sole inner face, a foot-elevating support of resilient material along and outstanding above the outer margin and heel outline of said unit, a metatarsal arch support of resilient material laterally of said unit, and a domed boss of resilient material outstanding from said unit for registration with and support of the joint common to the foot scaphoid, cuboid, astragalus and 0s calcis bones.

8. In an insole-type appliance of the character described having a thin, flexible unit contoured for cooperating accommodation and retention within a shoe in overlying relation with the shoe sole inner face, a foot-elevating support of resilient material along and outstanding in a substantially uniform thickness above the outer margin and heel outline of said unit between a forward terminal area disposed to underlie the foot fourth and fifth phalanges and a forwardlydirected rearward terminal underlying the scaphoid bone at the unit inner side, a metatarsal arch support of resilient material laterally of the unit from said first support in a Variable thickness productive of an upper surface contour conformable to that of said arch, and a domed boss of resilient material outstanding from said unit rearwardly of the metatarsal arch support for registration with and support of the joint common to the foot scaphoid, cuboid, astragalus and os calcis bones.

FLORIDA L. RIGGS.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2680919 *Dec 3, 1951Jun 15, 1954Florida L RiggsInsole-type appliance
US2857689 *Oct 19, 1956Oct 28, 1958Leila May Van OstromCorrective foot support
US4188736 *Mar 1, 1978Feb 19, 1980A/S Jac. EngelbredtFootwear with specially formed insole
US4784143 *Nov 16, 1987Nov 15, 1988Hebert Steven LMethod for correcting human gait by weighting of footwear
US4955148 *Apr 14, 1989Sep 11, 1990Rigoberto PadillaFoot support assembly
US5778562 *Oct 12, 1995Jul 14, 1998Lory Orthopadie Schuhtechnik Gesundheitsforum Service Und HandelsInsert for a shoe
US6253469Jul 10, 1998Jul 3, 2001Catherine AtlaniRelaxation sole and shoe equipped therewith
US6502330 *May 25, 2000Jan 7, 2003Loic DavidSole for footwear
US9345284 *Nov 30, 2012May 24, 2016YZ Studio, Inc.Foot trainer
US20130025158 *Jul 5, 2012Jan 31, 2013Richard Franklin BaskervilleFulcrum athletic shoe
US20130133223 *Nov 30, 2012May 30, 2013YZ Studio, Inc.Foot Trainer
US20150150336 *Feb 13, 2015Jun 4, 2015Kevin B. LawlorPronation correction
US20150196086 *Feb 26, 2015Jul 16, 2015Michael Paul RiddleIntegrated Medical Shoe Device
USD383894Dec 22, 1995Sep 23, 1997Schering-Plough Healthcare Products, Inc.Insole
EP1025770A3 *Feb 4, 2000Nov 22, 2000adidas International B.V.Shoe
WO1999002058A1 *Jul 10, 1998Jan 21, 1999Catherine AtlaniRelaxation sole and shoe equipped therewith
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/178, 36/43
International ClassificationA43B7/22
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/1415, A43B7/22, A43B7/1435, A43B7/143, A43B7/1445
European ClassificationA43B7/14A20C, A43B7/14A20F, A43B7/14A20M, A43B7/14A20, A43B7/22