Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2549225 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 17, 1951
Filing dateApr 5, 1948
Priority dateApr 5, 1948
Publication numberUS 2549225 A, US 2549225A, US-A-2549225, US2549225 A, US2549225A
InventorsArthur Moy
Original AssigneeArthur Moy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nondrip dispensing bottle stopper
US 2549225 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A ril 17, 1951 Filed April 5, 1948 A. MOY 2,549,225

NONDRIP DISPENSING BOTTLE STOPPER 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 JNVEN TOR. j/ZTYUA M01 Afluavzr April 17, 1951 MOY 2,549,225

NONDRIP DISPENSING BOTTLE STOPPER Filed April 5, 1948 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

ARTHUR MOY BY WWW. W

a. ATTORNEYS Patented Apr. 17, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 6 Claims.

The present invention relates to a bottle V is shown as having a neck I l which is internally stopper construction and more particularly to a bottle stopper intended for use with a bottle containing liquid and constructed and arranged to provide for pouring of liquid from the bottle in a controlled manner without loosening or removing the stopper from the bottle.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a bottle stopper construction effective to cause pouring flow from the bottle to take place evenly and in a controlled manner and to cause liquid to flow back into the bottle when the bottle is uprighted without dripping or draining along the exterior of the bottle.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a bottle stopper which permits pouring of liquid from the bottle without removal of the stopper or loosening of the stopper in thebottle.

It is a feature of the present invention to provide for controlled flow of liquid from a bottle during pouring by providing a bottle stopper having a smooth continuous inclined surface at the underside of the top of the stopper along which liquid flows due to adhesion and surface tension.

Other features and objects of the invention will become apparent as the description proceeds, especially when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure l is a fragmentary view partly in section of the top of a bottle and a stopper constructed in accordance with the present invention.

Figure 2 is a plan view of the stopper illustrated in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a side elevation partly in section of the bottle shown in pouring position and illustrating the manner in which the flow of liquid takes place.

Figure 4 is a plan view of a bottle stopper illustrating a second embodiment of the present invention.

Figure 5 is a longitudinal section of a bottle in which the stopper illustrated in Figure 4 is in place.

Figure 6 is a side elevation of the bottle stopper shown in Figure 4.

Figure '7 is a front elevation of a bottle stopper illustrating yet another embodiment of the present invention.

Figure 8 is a side elevation of the bottle stopper shown in Figure 7.

Figure 9 is a section on the line 9--9 of Figure 8.

Referring first to Figures 1-3, the bottle I0 threaded as indicated at 12. The stopper l3 has a lower portion [4 provided with threads engaging with the threads l2 in the neck of the bottle. The threads on the bottom portion of the stopper 13 are so formed as to fit loosely with the threads [2 in the neck of the bottle. The arrangement is such that the threads engage sufficiently to prevent removal of the stopper from the bottle except by screwing, but at the same time the looseness of fit is such that liquid may flow outwardly along the threads.

The upper portion of the stopper I3 is laterally enlarged and preferably is elongated having portions l6 and I! which are diametrically disposed and which project further than the remaining portions of the top of the stopper. The under surface 18 of the top of the stopper is smoothly and continuously curved and is connected to the bottom portion of the stopper by a smoothly curved connecting surface. This has the result of causing flow of fluid from the bottle in a controlled manner. Due to adhesion of the liquid to the stopper and to surface tension in the liquid, the liquid flows along the under sur-- face l8 toward one or the other of the projections I 6 and I! and is discharged therefrom in a uniform controlled stream as indicated at [9 in Figure 3. At the same time the clearance between the threads of the stopper and bottle neck provide a passage indicated at 2i for the flow of air into the bottle as the liquid is poured therefrom.

Referring now to Figures 4, 5 and 6 there is illustrated another embodiment of the present invention, which, however, operates in substantially the same manner as that previously described. In this case the bottle is indicated at 25 and is provided with a neck 26 which is internally threaded. The stopper 2'! has a lower threaded portion 28, an annular seating portion 29, and a laterally extending top portion SW. The top portion 30 is preferably transversely elongated having portions 3| and 32 establishing its major axis. An under surface 33 of the top portion 30 is here illustrated inclined at a relatively large angle to the axis of ne tle. this surface need not be at any particular angle, improved results are obtained when the surface makes an angle of at least forty-five degrees, and is preferably between sixty and ninety degrees.

At opposite sides of the stopper and in alignment with the major axis of the laterally enlarged top portion 30 are provided smooth continuous grooves 35 which extend upwardly along the threaded portion 28 and along the under surface 33 of the stopper top 30. It is essential that the grooves 35 be smooth and continuous so that the liquid will be caused to follow the grooves in a controlled manner into the edge of the laterally enlarged top portion of the stopper.

Referring now to Figures 7-9, there is illustrated yet another embodiment of the present invention. In this case the bottle stopper is indicated at 49 and is provided with a bottom portion 4! and a top portion 42. The top portion 42 is laterally enlarged and is transversely elongated having portions 43 and. 44 which establish its major transverse dimension. The portions 45 of the under surface of the top 42 which are aligned with the laterally extending portions 43 and 44 are inclined at a relatively great angle to the axis of the bottle. Diametrically opposite grooves 46 are provided in alignment with the major axis of the top portion which is established by the transversely extending portions 43 and 44. The grooves 46 are smooth and continuous and provide a path along which liquid may flow in a controlled manner. The stopper indicated in these figures is of the type adapted to engage with the neck of a bottle in the manner of an ordinary cork and for this purpose the lower portion 41 of the stopper is provided with a cylindrical sleeve 48 which overlies the grooves 46 and which is adapted to fit smoothly within the neck of a bottle.

In all of the embodiments of the present invention the essential construction is the provision of a smooth continuous path for the flow of liquid from the interior of the bottle to an edge of the top of the bottle. It is further essential that in all cases this path of flow extend at a relatively great angle to the axis of the bottle. This angle, as previously mentioned, is preferably but not necessarily larger than forty-five degrees and is preferably between sixty and ninety degrees. By making the path of fiow along the under side of the bottle stopper extend at the relatively large angle described above the natural tendency of the liquid to adhere to the stopper, its capillary action, and the surface tension of the liquid is taken advantage of to cause the fiow of liquid in a cohesive stream. In all cases the bottle and stopper may be employed without loosening the stopper. When the pouring operation has been completed and the bottle is returned to upright position the liquid remaining on the under surface of the stopper will retrace its fiow and run back into the bottle. In all cases dripping and draining of liquid along the outside of the bottle is effectively prevented.

In all cases the upper portion of the stopper is laterally elongated and this lateral elongation is employed to increase the angle which the aligned portion of its under surface makes with the axis of the bottle. Moreover, the lateral elongations serve as indicators, it being noted that the bottle should be tilted so that one or the other of the elongations at the top shall be downward. If desired the top surface of the stopper may have indicia such as arrows to emphasize the position in which the bottle should be held for pouring.

This case is a continuation in part of my prior application Serial Number 729,211, Non-Drip Bottle Stopper, filed February 18, 1947, now abandoned,

The drawings and the foregoing specification constitute a description of the improved non-drip bottle stopper in such full, clear, concise and exact terms as to enable any person skilled in the art to practice the invention, the scope of which is indicated by the appended claims.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. A pouring, non-drip bottle stopper having a bottom portion received within a neck of a bottle and provided with a longitudinal groove defining a passage for pouring liquid without removing the stopper from the bottle, said stopper having a laterally enlarged top portion, the groove continuing along the under side of said top portion.

2. A pouring, non-drip bottle stopper having a bottom portion received within a neck of a bottle and provided with a longitudinal groove defining a passage for pouring liquid without removing the stopper from the bottle, said stopper having a laterally enlarged top portion, the groove continuing along the under side of said top portion, the under-surface of said top portion being disposed at an angle of' greater than forty-five degrees to the axis of the bottle.

3. A pouring, non-drip bottle stopper having a bottom portion received within a neck of a bottle and provided with a longitudinal groove defining a passage for pouring liquid without removing the stopper from the bottle, said stopper having a laterally enlarged top portion, the top portion being elongated transversely of the stopper, the groove being smoothly continuous along the under side of the top portion and aligned with its major transverse dimension.

4. A pouring, non-drip bottle stopper having a bottom portion received within a neck of a bottle and provided with a pair of longitudinal grooves defining passages for pouring liquid without removing the stopper from the bottle, said stopper having a laterally enlarged top portion, the top portion being elongated transversely of the stopper, the grooves being smoothly continuous along the under side of the top portion and aligned with its major transverse dimension.

5. A pouring, non-drip bottle stopper having a threaded bottom portion received within a neck of a bottle and provided with a longitudinal groove defining a passage for pouring liquid without removing the stopper from the bottle, said stopper having a laterally enlarged top portion, the groove continuing along the under side of said top portion.

6. A pouring, non-drip bottle stopper having a bottom portion received within a neck of a bottle and provided with a longitudinal groove defining a passage for pouring liquid without removing the stopper from the bottle, a sleeve surrounding said bottom portion, overlying said groove and adapted to fit snugly within the neck of the bottle, said stopper having a laterally enlarged top portion, the groove continuing along the under side of said top portion.

ARTHUR MOY.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,024,894 Heinemann Apr. 30, 1912 1,777,826 Cone Oct. '7, 1930 2,007,692 Reiter July 9, 1935 2,015,343 Jackson Sept. 24. 1935

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1024894 *Jul 18, 1911Apr 30, 1912Albert HeinemannCarafe and stopper.
US1777826 *Aug 6, 1928Oct 7, 1930Merck & Co IncThreaded bottle stopper
US2007692 *May 13, 1933Jul 9, 1935Adolf ReiterClosure for containers
US2015343 *Apr 23, 1935Sep 24, 1935William R Warner & Co IncStopper for dispensing spouts
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2788161 *Jul 1, 1955Apr 9, 1957Preferred Product Features IncDripless pouring device
US3017047 *Apr 8, 1959Jan 16, 1962American Thermos Products CompCombination vacuum bottle and closure means therefor
US3177502 *Jan 15, 1962Apr 13, 1965Meunier Roland JLiquid dispensing devices
US3184126 *May 27, 1963May 18, 1965Casull Don CFlow control valve for drinking containers and the like
US3955712 *Sep 12, 1974May 11, 1976Anthony SantoreBottle stopper
US5829638 *Jun 17, 1994Nov 3, 1998Lucas; NathanielFor inverted insertion to a water cooler
US5941404 *May 22, 1998Aug 24, 1999Denise A. ConsiglioTabbed threaded container cap
US6520387 *Jun 6, 2001Feb 18, 2003Creative Edge Design Group Ltd.Vent and pour cap
US6968980Dec 30, 2003Nov 29, 2005Unilever Home & Personal Care Usa, A Division Of Conopco, Inc.Pour spout fitment and container
US7021506 *Dec 31, 2002Apr 4, 2006Creative Edge Design Group, Ltd.Vent and pour cap
WO2000040475A1Dec 15, 1999Jul 13, 2000Unilever PlcManufactured pour spout fitment and container
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/307, 220/366.1, 222/484, 220/288, 222/571
International ClassificationB65D47/00, B65D47/40
Cooperative ClassificationB65D47/40
European ClassificationB65D47/40