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Publication numberUS2550781 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 1, 1951
Filing dateDec 9, 1946
Priority dateDec 9, 1946
Publication numberUS 2550781 A, US 2550781A, US-A-2550781, US2550781 A, US2550781A
InventorsColburn Richard R
Original AssigneeColburn Richard R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Concrete aggregate feeder having a measuring rotor and an adjustable feed hopper
US 2550781 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 1, 1951 R R coLBURN 2,550,781

CONCRETE AGGREGTEFEEDER HAVING A MEASURING ROTOR AND AN ADJUSTABLE FEED HOPPER Filed Dec. 9, 1946 3 Sheets-Sheet l 29 3%'3 INVENTOR.

7/5 i. BY I May 1, 1951 R. RCOLBURN 2,550,781

CONCRETE AGGREGATE FEEDER HAVING A MEAsuRTNG RoToR AND AN ADJUSTABLE FEED HoPPER Filed Deo. 9, 1946 s sheets-sheet 2 R. R. coLBURN 2,550,781 CONCRETE AGGREGATE FEEDER HAVING A MEAsuRING RoToE AND AN ADJUSTABLE FEED HoPPEE 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 May l, 1951 Filed Dec. 9, 1946 IIIII' O az D ' INVENTR. E ffl wg'aw YFO/ENEPS.

Patented May Y1, 1951 CONCRETE AGGREGATE FEEDER HAVING A MEASURING RO'ER AND N\ADJUST ABLE FEED HOPPER Richard R. ColburmtWaterloo, Iowa Application December 9, 1946, Serial No. 715,045

8 Ciaims.

The invention relates generally to improvements in the construction and operation of mechanism for continuously measuring successive batches of relatively dry and line concrete aggregate, and for transporting the same in the form of a uniform stream to places of utilization, with lthe aid of compressed air or the like; and relates more specifically to various improvements in ap paratus of the type disclosed inmy prior patents No. 2,299,565, granted October 20, 1942, and No. 27,413,293, granted December 31, 1946.

As shown and described in said prior application and patent, I have heretofore proposed the production of a dry concrete aggregate feeder having a revolving material measuring rotor provided with an annular series of upright pockets successively communicable at their upper ends with a bulk aggregate supply hopper, and at their lower ends with another revolving rotor having incrementbatch receiving recesses, and means for injecting compressed air through the pockets and recesses so as to remove the aggregate material and to produce a uniform stream of material flowing tothe source of utilization of the concrete. While the mechanisms revealed in these prior disclosures have proven highly practical and successfuliin actual commercial use, it has been found rather difficult and tedious in larger units, to remove the heavy material supply hoppers, and

to properly replace the same so as to effectively seal the compressed air ducts and the measuring pockets of the main rotor. Then too, some difliculty has been encountered in the matter of preventing grit from entering the bearing of the auxiliary rotor driving shaft, and in gaining quick access to and avoiding excessive and undesirably rapid wear on other parts ofthe mechanism which are exposed to the advancing aggregate,

. but the principle of operation of the prior de- A f "rtner object of the invention is to provide an aggregate feeder adapted to automatically deliver a. continuous uniform stream of the material to places of utilization, and wherein all parts are well protected against rapid wear, while also being readily accessible for inspection and replacement. A Y

Still another object of my invention is to provide an improved assemblage for constantly clelivering concrete aggregate to a cement gun or the like with the aid of compressed air, wherein the various bearings are most effectively protected against entry of grit, and in which the air `ducts are thoroughly sealed at all times.

An additional object of the present invention is to provide an improved portable concrete aggregate feed unit which is simple, compact and durable in construction, and which is also highly eiiicient in operation and flexible in its adaptations.

The above and other more specific objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description.

A clear conception of the several features constituting my present improvement, and of the mode of constructing and of utilizing concrete aggregate feeders embodying the invention, may be had by referring t0 the drawings accompanying and forming a part of this specification wherein like reference characters designate the same or similar parts in the various views.

Fig. 1 is a part sectional top view of the improved aggregate feeding unit looking into the material supply hopper and showing a plan View of the improved hopper supporting cradle, a transverse section having been taken through the lower portion of the hopper Wall along the line l-I of Fig. 2;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary part sectional rear-elevation of the improved assemblage, showing the auxiliary feed rotor and adjacent structure in section and the hopper cradle in elevation;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary part sectional side elevation of the same mechanism, showing the auX- iliary feed rotor and adjacent parts in section;

Fig. 4 is another fragmentary part sectional rear elevation of the assemblage, showing a part of the main measuring rotor and its driving mechanism in section, and having the hopper cradle ring omitted;

Fig. 5 is a top view of the improved auxiliary feed rotor housing showing a portion of the rotor confined therein; and

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a typical con` crete aggregate feeding unit completely assembled and ready for use.

While the improvements have been shown and described herein as being advantageously applicable to a particular type of aggregate feeder especially adapted for use in connection with cement guns, it is not my intention to unnecessarily restrict the utility of the invention by virtue of this limited disclosure.

Referring to the drawings, the improved typical concrete aggregate feeder unit specifically shown therein, comprises a portable truck 8 having rear supporting wheels 3 and a front supporting prop IQ; an aggregate feeder mounted upon the rear portion of the truck frame between the wheels 9 and having a material supply hopper I I communicable with a lower increment feed rotor I2 through an intervening measuring rotor I3; an internal combustion engine I4 or the like, mounted upon the truck frame between the rear wheels 9 and front prop I0 and being drivingly connected to the rotors I2, I3 by means of clutch controlledshats', I respectively; andia compressed air line .I1 communicating witha suitable .source of supply and being adapted to fur.- nish air. inregulated quantities to the feedpmechanism past a manually controlled valve I8.

The main rotor I3 is housed within a sturdy annular v.upright casing Eiiwhich is rmlyrsecured to the upper deckZI of thetruck 8 by bolts 22, andwhich is also provided with an integral central bearing 23. and with diametrically opposite integral external lugs 24, 25; and theauxiliary feed rotor I2 is .confined withina tubular horizontal casing 26 firmly secured to the bottom of the casing and having opposite integral end flanges 2, 28.1 and an intermediateupwardly directed duct 29 communicating with the lower interior of the casing 20, see Figs. 2, 3, 4 and 5. The measuring rotor I3 is provided with an annular series of upright cylindrical measuring pockets 3I A and is revolvable within the main casing 20 by means of a vertical central shaft 32 coacting with the bearing 23, and the lower extremity of this shaft 32 is drivingly connected to the main rotor-drive shaft I6 by a worm wheel 33 and a worm 34 both of which are enclosed in a sealed housing 3b,V as shown in Fig. 4. The increment and the front end of this shaft 3l is drivingly l connected to the auxiliary rotor drive shaft I5 by means of a flexible coupling Y33 as shown in Fig. 3.

The Vmaterial supply hopperII- which is normally disposed above the measuring rotor I3 ybut which should also be conveniently removable in order to permit free access to the interior of the main casing 20, `consists primarily of an upperV screening section 4I, an intermediate bin section '42 and a base section 43, the latter having a diaphragm 44 formed lintegral therewith and spanning the top of the rotor IS. This diaphragm 44 is provided with a pair of hopper discharge openings 45 which are registerable with the suc-` cessive 'advancing measuring pockets 3| as they revolve-about the axis of the shaft 32, and the 1 periphery of the base `section 43 is provided with a pair of diametrically opposite-integral lugs 46 each of which has a pivot screw-4l associated therewith, as illustrated in Figs. l, 2 and 3. A

relatively resilient but sturdy cradle ring 48 loosely surrounds the hopper base section 43 and has integral ears 49 with which the pivot screws- 41 coact; and the ring 48 is also provided with an integral outwardly projecting pivot 50 at one side and with an integral outwardly projecting manipulating handle 5I at its opposite side, both disposed at right angles to the common axis of the screws 47.

The side pivot 50 of the Cradle ring 48 is journalled in the medial portion of a block 52 having integral pivot pins 53 at the opposite ends thereof, and these alined pins 53 are journalled for oscillation in plates 54 rigidly secured to the opposite sides of the main casing lug 24. These coasting elements provide a universal joint between the cradle ring 48 and the casing 2U; and the manipulating handle 5I which is associated with the ring 48 Vremote from this universal joint, is provided with an enlarged hub portion 55 having a relatively large through opening adapted to loosely receive a stud 53 firmly secured to the iixedly casing lug 25, and to be conned upon the stud by a thumb nut 5'?, see Figs. l and 2. The improved hopper cradle thus provided, permits the hopper I to be either firmly held in normal active position as shown in Fig. 6, or swung away from and toward the tops of the casing 20 and main rotor I3 with the aid of the handle 5I Y when the clamping nut 5l is removed from-thev stud 5E; and the pivots 4?, 5t, 53 together with the loose t between the hub 35 and stud 56 will obviously permit the hopper-base 43m-automatically properly aline itself and conform to the top of the main rotor I3 whenever the clamping nut 5'I is reapplied to the fixed Stud 56.

The base section 43 of the supply hopper I I is also provided with a compressed air duct 59 located remote from the aggregate delivery openings 45 and directed toward and into-the upper ends of the successive advancing measuring pockets 3l formed of rubber and which is xedly secured to the bottom of the diaphragm 44, and compressed air from the supply line VI'i may be admitted to this duct 59 through a flexible tube 6I detachably secured to the base 43 by means of a yoke v62 and clamping screw S3, as depicted in Figs. l, 2, 3 and 6. The hopper base diaphragm 44 is moreover providedV with a central socket 64 which is adapted to coact with the upper extremity of the rotor shaft 32 above the rotor hub when the hopper II is in normalV position, andthe sealing disc 6G which is attached to the diaphragm 44 has openings therein corresponding to the feed openings 45. The top-of the main measuring rotor I3 is provided with a wear plate 65 forming an annular sealing ridge adaptedto snugly engage the upper disc 6B, and the Vbottom of this rotor I3 is also provided witha similar wear plate B forming an annular ridge likewise adapted to snugly engage a lower rubber sealing disc 6l which is fixedly secured to the bottomof the main casing 2D and has ancpeningtherein driving shaft 3l' by means of a pin 'I0 piercing' this shaft and coacting lwith notches in one 'end through an upper sealing disc Ew of the auxiliary rotor core 1I, and a retaining screw 12 coacting with the end of the shaft 31 and with the opposite end of the core 1l through a clamping disc 13, as shown in Fig. 3. The bearing 38 for the horizontal shaft 31 is snugly but removably confined within one end of the tubular auxiliary casing 26 by capy screws 14 and is provided with an air duct or passage 15 in its lower portion one end of which communicates with the air supply line Il' through a pipe 13, and the opposite delivery end of which is communicable with the forward ends of the successive lowermost advancing recesses 35 of the revolving feed rotor I2. The bore of the bearing 33 is effectively sealed from the auxiliary rotor chamber by an improved packing 11 having two solid rings snugly embracing the shaft 31 on opposite sides of a flexible packing'disc, each of the solid rings having a lateral annular groove adjacent to the shaft periphery and facing the rotor I2, and this packing 11 is protected and held in place by a disc 18. The opposite end of the tubular auxil-l iary casing 2G is provided with a closure fitting 19 having a discharge passage for the aggregate stream formed in an integral projection 83 thereof, and the outer end of this projection is provided with screw threads 8| for effecting attachment of a hose leading to the final cement gun or other source of utilization.

The casings 23, 25, bearing 38, main rotor I3, auxiliary rotor core 1I, and fitting 33 are formed primarily of durable metal, ,and in order to protect the duct 29, rotor I2, and the fitting B against excessive abrasion and wear due to the constant travel of the abrasive aggregate therethrough, these parts are preferably provided with rubber liners or surfaces. is formed as a rubber bushing which is stretched over the core 1I, thus providing the feeding recesses 36 with wear resistant surfaces, and the casing duct 23 is provided with a rubber liner 82, while the fitting 83 is also provided with a rubber liner 83. These liners 82, 83 cooperate with the sealing discs Si), 31 and with the auxiliary rotor to provide wear resistant surfaces wherever exposed to high velocity now of the abrasive material, thus materially prolonging the life of the unit to a maximum, and the discharge passage formed in the fitting 19 is preferably disposed in horizontal alinement with the air supply passage 15 so that the successive revolving material lled l recesses 36 will be placed in alinment with these passages as the rotor I2 is rotated, see Figs. 3, 4 and 5.

During normal use of the improved concrete aggregate measuring and feeding device, the portable unit, after having been properly constructed, assembled and provided with abundant lubrication wherever necessary, may be readily transported from place to place and actuated to accurately measure and to deliver a constant uniform stream of aggregate through the discharge conduit of the tting 19 to the nal zone or places of utilization, such as a spray gun or the like attached by means of a hose to the screw threads 8l. Such normal operation may be effected by merely operating the engine I 4, throwing in the clutch mechanism with the aid of the lever 85 shown in Fig. 6, opening the compressed air supply valve I8, and maintaining an abundant supply of aggregate material within the hopper I I. When the measuring rotor I3 is constantly rotated by its driving shaft I6, 32 through the worm gearing 33, 34, the successive pockets 3| will be brought into open communication with The auxiliary rotor I2 the supply hopper Il through the arcuate openings 45 formed in the diaphragm 44 and in the upper sealing disc 60, and the pockets are then filled by gravity with equal batches of material. As the successive pockets 3| are carried beyond the openings 45, they are momentarily tightly sealed at both ends by the upper and lower rubber discs 60, 61, before being exposed to the compressed air admission duct 59.

As soon as each ofthe previously filled pockets 3l is brought into communication with the compressed air duct 59 the measured batch of material is ejected downwardly therefrom by compressed air, and after passing through the rubber lined duct 29, increments of the measured batches.

of the material are removed from the descending charges and partially fill the relatively small and more rapidly revolving upper recesses 33 of the feed rotor l2. Y The successive emptied pockets. 3! are subsequently transported between the;

sealing discs 63, 51 toward the hopper openings 45 for refilling, and while the material laden recesses 33 of the auxiliary rotor i2 are being; carried toward their lowermost positions within the casing 26, the compressed air delivered from the passage 15 through the space between the forward end of the feed rotor I2 and into the recesses 36, constantly tends to urge the increments of material toward the rear ends of these recesses. When the successive material laden recesses 36 are brought into axial alinement with the air supply passage 15 and with the discharge passage form-ed in the fitting 19, the increments of material are quickly ejected longitudinally from the rotor recesses 33 and into the discharge: passage, and the mixture of air and aggregate material is thereafter discharged in the form of.'

a constant and uniform stream of mixture to the zone of utilization.

'This normal operation of the mechanism ob viously continues as long as the compressed air valve I3 remains open, and if it becomes desir able to gain access to the internal mechanisms..

the clutch lever 85 should first be operated to.-

. I 2, it is only necessary to remove the fitting 19 by withdrawing the adjacent cap screw 1li, and the bearing 38 may likewise be readily removed from the opposite end of the auxiliary casing 26. The Wear plates 65, 68 may also be readily removed from the main body of the rotor I3, thus making it possible to gain rapid and convenient access to all essential parts of the mechanism.

The improved cradle structurefor the hopper Il, also permits rapid and effective replacement of the hopper Il to its normal position, and enables most efficient sealing of the air duct 59 and of the joints between the rotor I3 and the adjacent sealing discs G0, 61. Such sealing of the parts may be effected by merely manipulating the thumb nut 51 until the desired sealing pressure is obtained, and the improved packing 11 for the shaft 31 and bearing 38 has proven highly eiective for thepurpose of preventing grit from entering the bearing surfaces of the shaft 31.c

Thehose 6| mayalso be readily connected-'to and* disconnected fromv the air supplyVv ductl withl the aid of the clamping-screw 63, thus providv ing a highly eiiicient unit in which allpart'saref conveniently removable and protected-*againstrapid wear.

ing unit which functions to automatically produce a constant uniform stream of the aggregatev and which is extrem-ely durable'in structure. The assemblage while being relatively compact has enormous capacity and performs its intended function with minimum attention and with utmost reliability. The cradle Isupport for the agg eegate supply hopper Ii, besides permitting rapid access to the measuring pocket structure, also enables most eiiicient sealing of the measuring pockets and of the air ducts, and the improved construction oi the auxiliaryrotor casing 2t also facilitates access to the rotor I2 and removal thereof. The provision of therenewable wear plates at the opposite ends of the main rotor I3 not only facilitates initial machining and prolongs the life of this rotor; but the annular sealing ridges of these plates are also adapted to sink into the adjacent rubber sealing discs 6G, 6'! when pressure is applied with the aid of the thumb nut l, thus insuring effective sealing of the rotor i3 at all times and making it possible to readily compensate for wear, The improved packing 77 effectively protects the shaft bea-ring 38 against undesirable entry oi grit, and the liners 82, i3 cooperate with the rubber rotor l2 to eliminate excessive wear. The tubular formation of the auxiliary rotor casing 2S ith rigid flanges at its opposite ends and with the iitting '19 coacting with one of these flanges closely adjacent to the rotor i2, also makes it possible to quickly inspect this rotor and to remove the same. The improved unit has gone into highly satisfactory and successful commercial use, and has eliminated many-of the slight difiiculties encountered with similar mechanisms; and the assemblage may be manufactured and sold at moderate cost.

it should be understood that it is not desired to limit this invention to the exact details of construction or to the precise Imode of use, herein shown and described, or various modifications within the scope of the appended claims may occur to persons skilled in the art; and it is also intended that specific descriptive terms used herein be given the broadest possible interpretation consistent with the rest of the invention.

I claim:

i. In a measuring and feeding device, a casing having an upright bore, a material measuring rotor revolvable within said bore, a material supply hopper for .directing material toward said rotor, a resilient seal clamped between said hopper and said rotor, a cradle ring surrounding said seal externally-of said hopper, alined pivots connecting opposite sides of said ring with said hopper to permit tilting of the hopper in one direction, a block member swingably connected to saidy casing remote from said alined pivots to also permit tiltingof said ring in said direction, and a pivot connecting said member and said ring for Y pivots for permitting tilting of the ring vand yhopper in a transverse direction.

ing having an upright'borefa material measu'r Tis ing-said` seal externallyof said hopper,'alined pivotsconnecting'opposite sides of said ring with said' hopper" to permit tilting of the'hopper in onedirection, a block member 'swingably connected' to said casing remote from said alinedA pivotsto also permit tilting of said ring in said direction, a pivot connecting said member and said ring for permitting tilting of the ring and hopper in a transverse direction, and means for varying the positionof said ring to alter thev permit tilting of the hopper toward and away from the bore axis in one direction, a hinge connection between said casing and said ring remote from said alined pivots for also permitting tilting of said ring in said direction, and a pivot connecting said ring and said hinge connection for permitting tilting of the ring and' hopper in a transverse direction relative to said axis.

`4. In a measuring and feeding device, a casing having an upright bore, a material feeding rotor revolvable within said bore, a material supply hopper for directing material toward said rotor, a resilient sealing disc clamped between the bottom of said hopper and the top of said rotor, a cradle ring surrounding said disc externally of said hopper, alined lpivots connecting opposite sides of said ring with said hopper to permit tilting of the hopper toward and away fromr the bore axis in one direction, a hinge connection between said casing and said ring remote from said alined pivots for also permitting tilting of said ring in said direction, a pivot connecting said ring and said hinge connection for permitting tilting of the ring and hopper in a transverse direction relative to said axis, and means for swinging said ring about said connecting pivot to vary the clamping pressure between said hopper and said rotor.

5. In a measuring and feeding device, a casing having an upright'bore, a material feeding rotor revolvable within said bore, a materialsupply hopper vhaving a bottom provided with an opening for directing material toward said rotor, a resilient sealing disc clamped between said hopper bottom and the top of said rotor, a cradle ring surrounding said' 'disc externally of saidhopper, alined pivots connecting opposite sides of said ring with said hopper bottom to permit tilting of the hopper relative to the ring in one direction, a hinge connection between said casing and'said ring remote from andfmid-way between said isopermitting tilting of said ring in said directon, and a pivot' pin connecting said ring and said hinge -connection for permitting tilting of the ring and hopper in a direction at right anglesV to said alined pivots.

n a measuring and feeding device, a casing having an upright bore, amaterial feeding rotor revolvable'pwithin said bore, a material supply hopper having a 'bottom' provided with' an vopening 9 for directing material toward said rotor, a resilient sealing disc clamped between said hopper bottom and the top of said rotor, a cradle ring surrounding said disc externally of said hopper, alined pivots connecting opposite sides of said ring with said hopper bottom to permit tilting oi v the hopper relative to the ring in one direction, a

having an upright bore, a material measuring and feeding rotor revolvable Within said bore, a niaterial supply hopper having a bottom provided With an opening for directing material toward said rotor, a resilient seal clamped between said hopper bottom and the top of said rotor, a cradle ring surrounding said disc externally of said hopper, pivots connecting the opposite sides of said ring with said hopper to permit tilting of the hopper relative to the ring in one direction, a block having a hin-ge connection with said casing for also permitting tilting of the block in said direction, and a pivot pin connecting said blocl to said ring remote from and mid-Way between said pivots for permitting tilting of said ring in a direction at right angles to said pivots.

8. In a measuring and feeding device, a casing having an upright bore, a material measuring and feeding rotor revolvable within said bore, a material supply hopper having a bottom provided with an opening for directing material toward said rotor, a resilient seal clamped between said hopper bottom and the top of said rotor, a cradle ring surrounding said disc externally of said hopper, pivots connecting the opposite sides of said ring with said hopper to permit tilting of the hopper relative to the ring in one direction, a block having a hinge connection with said casing for also permitting tilting of the block in said direction, a pivot pin connecting said block to said ring remote from and mid-way between said pivots for permitting tilting of said ring in a direction at right angles to said pivots, and adjustable means ooacting with said ring and said casing remote from said block for varying the clamping pressure on said seal.

RICHARD R. COLBURN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 719,237 Lindgren Jan. 27, 1903 1,001,367 Dennis Aug. 22, 1911 2,152,632 Cassiere Apr. 4, 1939 2,183,547 Collier Dec. 19, 1939 2,299,565 Colburn Oct. 20, 1942 2,413,293 Colburn Deo. 31, 1946 2,417,700 McCarty Mar. 18, 1947

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US719237 *Jul 15, 1902Jan 27, 1903Moline Plow CoSeed-dropping mechanism.
US1001367 *Apr 13, 1911Aug 22, 1911Int Harvester CoCorn-planter.
US2152632 *May 1, 1934Apr 4, 1939Frank L RogersFeed mechanism
US2183547 *Oct 26, 1938Dec 19, 1939Cement Gun CompanyApparatus for placing cementitious material
US2299565 *Feb 2, 1942Oct 20, 1942Colburn Richard RPneumatic feeder
US2413293 *Mar 30, 1945Dec 31, 1946Colburn Richard RAggregate measurer and feeder
US2417700 *Jan 20, 1945Mar 18, 1947Mccarty Everett BUnloading and loading apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2833542 *Feb 14, 1952May 6, 1958George D BavinApparatus for distributing particles along a surface
US3195776 *Dec 3, 1962Jul 20, 1965Grace W R & CoAutomatic catalyst dispenser
US3995777 *Aug 6, 1975Dec 7, 1976Jerry DiezGatling valve
US4092046 *May 27, 1975May 30, 1978Spribag AktiengesellschaftPneumatic feeder-dispenser for bulk material
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/164, 222/370, 222/227, 222/236, 222/626
International ClassificationB65G53/46, B65G53/40
Cooperative ClassificationB65G53/4616
European ClassificationB65G53/46B2