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Publication numberUS2550840 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 1, 1951
Filing dateSep 24, 1946
Priority dateSep 24, 1946
Publication numberUS 2550840 A, US 2550840A, US-A-2550840, US2550840 A, US2550840A
InventorsMartin Earnest E, Ralph Walsh
Original AssigneeUniversal Properties Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Valve control for pressure fluid containers
US 2550840 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1951 E. E. MARTIN ETAL VALVE CONTROL FOR PRESSURE FLUID CONTAINERS Filed Sept 24, 1946 lkzwms fik mmw; WWW @M INVENTORS .IQTIv/P/VEY Patented May 1, 1951 VALVE CONTROL FOR PRESSURE FLUID CONTAINERS Earnest E. Martin, Pasadena, and Ralph Walsh,

Los Angeles, Calif., assignors to Universal Properties, Inc., Los Angeles, Calif.,, a corporation of California Application September 24, 1946, Serial No. 698,926

a 3 Claims.

This invention relatesgenerally to improvements in dispensing valve devices for fluid containers, and is concerned particularly with valveequipped vessels for dispensing pressure fluids such as insecticidal solutionsof the aerosol type having super i atmospheric vapor pressure and contained in'the'vesseI in liquid phase;

One major object of the invention is to provide a valve device with a control head particularly adapted for accommodation within the head of a container given concave shape to efiectively re sist internal fluid pressure. Specifically the invention contemplates the use of a valve control having adispensing head which, when the'containers are in packaged condition or otherwise subjected to possible damage to the dispensing head, is entirely accommodated within the concavity of the container end.

A further object is to provide a type, of valve control dispensing head which is detachable from the body or stem portion of the valve, or of a primary valve acting to seal the container with the dispensing head removed, and which is provided with an attachment'permitting connection ofthe head with the valve body in a sealing, position permitting the head to be'entirely contained within the vessel concavity,v whereas when connected to the valve body in a dispensing position, the head may project beyond or outside the vessel.

All the various features and objects of the invention as well as the details of a typical and illustrative embodiment will be understood to better advantage from the following description of the accompanying drawing, in which:

i Fig. I is a view partly in section showing the pressure fluid can with the dispensing head or cap applied to the syphon tube and contained within the concavity of the container head; and Fig. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-section showing the cap in changed (dispensing) position. and its relation to the self-closing valve.

As previously indicated, the invention has particular applicability in conjunction with a pressure fluid container in the form of a can ID, the head H and bottom [2 of which are made in concave form, giving the can added strength and resistance against internal pressure. The can is particularly made to contain a solution of an insecticide in a liquefied normally gaseous solvent or propellent, for example a solvent containing dichlorodifluoromethane and having a vapor pressure around 25 pounds per square inch. The can is charged and its contents dispensed through a tube I3 made for example of 1% inch 2 O. D. seamless tubing extending through the concave head H and brazed thereto at M.

The tube is given'rolled deformations at'lon'gi tudinally spaced locations to form upper and lower inside shoulders I5 and 16 presenting accurately shaped and smoothly curved surfaces. A check valve, preferably in the form of a metal ball check ll, seats upwardly against shoulder 45 by virtue of the container pressure and the thrust of coil spring [8 bearing against shoulder it. In the process of inserting the valve and spring assembly in the tube, shoulder l5 may first be formed, the valve and spring inserted in the tube, and shoulder It then rolled while the spring is compressed away from it. The tube thus is formed as a valve containing unit to be inserted through and brazed in the concave head II.

An upper or cap section ['0 of thetube is detachably secured to the lower section l3 in the position of Fig. 2, by inter-engaging threads 20 and 2| rolled in the adjacent ends of the sections. The cap has an outwardly flared bottom flange 2,2 which engages against a seal ring 23 contained within the head recess 24, 'to maintain a fluidtight seal. The cap contains an axially movable stem 25 engageable against the valve I! and ex' tending at its upper end through a seal ring 25 confined between shoulders 2'! and 28.

As the stem 25 is depressed to unseat the valve ll, fluid escapes from the container through tube [3 into the cap from which the fluid is discharged as a spray or fog from orifice 30, formed for example by an 0.0225 inch drill. As will be observed, the orifice 30 is positioned above the top line or plane 3! of the can so that the spray is projected free and clear of any consequential impingement against the can. A second orifice 32 of smaller size than opening 30, and formed for example by an 0.012 inch drill, extends through the wall of tube I3 at a location below the valve I7 and above the liquid level in the can to admit sufficient vapor to the fluid stream being discharged through the tube, to assist in eflecting complete atomization of the spray particles discharged from orifice 30.

The cap section l9 carries a laterally projecting closure 33 in the form of an integrally attached threaded cap containing a sealing gasket 34 and having an outer flared flange portion 35. In addition to affording a positively sealed closure for the top of the tube [3, the cap 33 serves as a means of permitting attachment of the entire cap assembly in a position such that it isfcompletely contained within the concavity of the can head II and thus protected against impact or damage under such circumstances as might occur if the cap assembly were permitted to extend appreciably outside the top plane of the can.

The can initially is filled with the cap assembly removed by application of the upper end of tube [3 to a filling machine. Upon reception of the charge in the can and removal of the filling head, valve 1! seats to seal the container. During shipment of the can and until such time as its contents are to be dispensed, cap 33 may be screwed onto the tube l3 to serve the twofold purpose of effecting a positive seal by the engagement of cap flange 35 against the seal ring 23 and the engagement of gasket 35 against the upper end of the tube, and to permit accommodation of the entire cap assembly within the concavity of the can head. When the contents are to be dispensed, the cap assembly is removed and reapplied in the position of Fig. 2, positioning the stem 25 for operation to control the valve ll. Thedirection of the spray discharged from orifice is predeterminable by reference to the.po'- sition of the cap 33, since the latter is located diametrically opposite the orifice.

We claim:

1. A pressure fluid can having a concave head, a siphon tube extending through said head and having an uppe threaded end, the wall of said tube being annularly deformed to provide an inside annular shoulder, a check valve seating upwardly against said shoulder to normally prevent fluid escape from the container through the tube, a spring contained within the container inside the tube and acting to seat the valve, a cap having a threaded end attachable in one position of the cap to the threaded end of the tube to retain said cap in a position extending upwardly out of the head concavity, means carried by the cap and operable in said position thereof to engage and unseat said valve to release fluid through an orifice in the cap, and a threaded cup-shaped closure carried by one side of said body and attachable to said tube to positively seal the tube against fluid escape, the cap being entirely contained within the concavity of the head when the tube is sealed by said closure.

2. A pressure fluid can having a concave head, a siphon tube extending through said head and having an upper threaded end, the wall of said inside the tube and acting to seat the valve, a cap having a threaded end attachable in one position of the cap to the threaded end of the tube to retain said cap in a position extending upwardly out of the head concavity, means carried by the cap and operable in said position thereof to engage and unseat said valve to release fluid through an orifice in the portion of the cap above said concavity, and a threaded cup-shaped closure carried by one side of said body and attachable to said tube to positively seal the tube against fluid escape, the cap being entirely contained within the concavity of the head when the tube is sealed by said closure, said discharge orifice being located in the side of said body diametrically opposite said cap.

3. A pressure fluid can having a concave head, a siphon tube extending through said head and having an upper threaded end, the wall of said tube being annularly deformed to provide an inside annular shoulder, a check valve seating upwardly against said shoulder to normally prevent fluid escape from the container through the tube,

a spring contained within the container inside the tube and acting to seat the valve, a cap having a threaded end attachable in one position of the cap to the threaded end of the tube, to retain said cap in a position extending upwardly out of the head concavity, an axially movable stem carried within said cap and operable in said position thereof to engage and unseat said valve to release fluid through a discharge orifice located in the cap beyond the head concavity, sealing means in the cap for preventing fluid leakage about the stem, and a threaded cup-shaped closure carried by one side of said body and attachable to said tube to positively seal the tube against fluid escape, the cap being entirely contained with the concavity of the head when the tube is sealed by said closure.

EARNEST E. MARTIN.

RALPH WALSH.

. REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 710,674 Fassmann Oct. 7, 1902 1,411,573 McGarrahan Apr. 4, 1922 1,421,645 Wilson July 4, 1922 1,572,727 Kerr Feb. 9, 1926 1,983,381 MacGill Dec. 4, 1934 2,032,024 Lucker Feb. 25, 1936

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US710674 *Aug 5, 1901Oct 7, 1902Firm Of A MartincovicsSiphon-head for soda-water bottles or the like.
US1411573 *Jan 13, 1921Apr 4, 1922J S Giles & SonsCombination cap nozzle with detachable closing cap for cans
US1421645 *Jan 4, 1921Jul 4, 1922Wilson Donald StuartToilet case
US1572727 *Jun 20, 1924Feb 9, 1926Rockgas Products CompanyLiquid-fuel container
US1983381 *Feb 1, 1932Dec 4, 1934Frederick Macgill CharlesApparatus for preserving and dispensing liquids
US2032024 *Jun 1, 1934Feb 25, 1936Lucker Hubert HBeer keg and dispensing mechanism
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2670106 *Oct 12, 1950Feb 23, 1954Oil Equipment Lab IncMultipurpose pressurized container valve
US2679140 *Apr 22, 1952May 25, 1954Ronson Art Metal Works IncFuel storing and charging cartridge
US2694211 *Oct 2, 1948Nov 16, 1954John P FoxGlue gun
US2716508 *Dec 11, 1950Aug 30, 1955Booth Jack JPortable beverage dispenser
US2734774 *Jun 15, 1951Feb 14, 1956 manseau
US2757963 *Feb 3, 1953Aug 7, 1956Drell Leonard BSpray head for valves
US2768771 *Dec 1, 1953Oct 30, 1956Beutel Werner KDispenser for carbonated beverages
US2885029 *May 28, 1956May 5, 1959Burrell William EMultipoint greasing system
US3080094 *Apr 29, 1958Mar 5, 1963Modern Lab IncCompartmented pressurized container valve assembly and a cutter therefor
US3169677 *Dec 17, 1962Feb 16, 1965Precision Valve CorpValve mechanism with metering ball for aerosol pressure containers
US3172568 *Mar 27, 1959Mar 9, 1965Modern Lab IncPressurized dispensing device
US5964416 *Oct 4, 1996Oct 12, 1999Boehringer Ingelheim GmbhDevice for producing high pressure in a fluid in miniature
US6230501May 3, 1999May 15, 2001Promxd Technology, Inc.Ergonomic systems and methods providing intelligent adaptive surfaces and temperature control
US6402055Jul 16, 1999Jun 11, 2002Boehringer Ingelheim GmbhDevice for producing high pressure in a fluid in miniature
US6497373May 13, 2002Dec 24, 2002Boehringer International GmbhDevice for producing high pressure in a fluid in miniature
US6622751Feb 4, 1999Sep 23, 2003Continental Teves Ag & Co., OhgPressure valve for a reciprocating pump
US6918547Mar 24, 2004Jul 19, 2005Joachim JaegerDevice for producing high pressure in a fluid in miniature
US7104470Jun 24, 2005Sep 12, 2006Boehringer Ingelheim International GmbhDevice for producing high pressure in a fluid in miniature
US7219449Jun 17, 2004May 22, 2007Promdx Technology, Inc.Adaptively controlled footwear
US8479725 *Jun 26, 2006Jul 9, 2013Boehringer Ingelheim International GmbhNebuliser
US20040178227 *Mar 24, 2004Sep 16, 2004Boehringer International GmbhDevice for producing high pressure in a fluid in miniature
US20050252990 *Jun 24, 2005Nov 17, 2005Joachim JaegerDevice for producing high pressure in a fluid in miniature
DE1091390B *Jan 15, 1955Oct 20, 1960Jean MercierVentil mit Druckmittelkreislauf
DE1152634B *Mar 24, 1959Aug 8, 1963Victor W SmirlesAuslassvorrichtung fuer Fluessigkeiten aus Behaeltern
DE19536902A1 *Oct 4, 1995Apr 10, 1997Boehringer Ingelheim IntVorrichtung zur Hochdruckerzeugung in einem Fluid in Miniaturausführung
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/402.25, 222/464.1, 222/501, 222/538
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/38
European ClassificationB65D83/38