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Publication numberUS2551340 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 1, 1951
Filing dateJun 23, 1944
Priority dateJun 23, 1944
Publication numberUS 2551340 A, US 2551340A, US-A-2551340, US2551340 A, US2551340A
InventorsSands Jr Edward F
Original AssigneeSands Jr Edward F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy airplane construction
US 2551340 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1951 E. F. SANDS, JR 2,551,340

TOY AIRPLANE CONSTRUCTION Filed June 23, 1944 4 Sheets-Sheet l 2 F8 E61 21 k; 40 )3 [q 44 2 3mm EDWARDFSANDS, 52.

25 1 3 QwmBmm May 1, 1951 E. F. SANDS, JR 2,551,340

TOY AIRPLANE CONSTRUCTION Filed June 25, 1944 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 F 75 Q I 55 57 I2.

49 as 46 a 56 CHIC] M57 DU 13 U I L 61 g Fi Z7 EUDVWAKD F SANDS, (fie. Q m9; 65 Eq. 1 3% W m 6 Wang E. F. SANDS, JR

TOY AIRPLANE CONSTRUCTION May 1, 1951 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed June 25, 1944 Swan/MM 1 EDWARD FSANDS, JR.

I6. 54 fawn M y 1, 1951 E. F. SANDS, JR 2,551,340

TOY AIRPLANE CONSTRUCTION Filed June 23, 1944 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 9H3 E no fig-24 E625 97 93 E F1626 2 g H EDWARD F SANDS, die.

, adhesive.

shape.

Patented May 1, 1951 UNITED TOY AIRPLANE CONSTRUCTION Edward F. Sands, In, St. Paul, Minn.

Applicationfiune 23, 1944, Serial No. 541,782

(Cl. Mi-17) '.Claims.

1 My invention relates to an improvement in toy airplane construction, wherein itis desired to provide a toy airplane which may be put together without the use ofglue orrother adhesives.

Various types of toy airplane constructions have been placed on the'market in recent years.

.Most of these constructions comprise a packet of material for use in constructing a toy airplane of a given size and shape. These toys have in recent years become extremely popular. However, one of the main objectionszto suchconstruotions lies in the fact that adhesive must be used to secure the various parts of the toyplane .in proper relation. The toy planes are usually constructed by children of various ages, some of whom experience difiiculty in properly handling the As a result this adhesive is likely to spot clothes, draperies and upholstery and to mar woodwork and various articlesof furniture.

fuselage the wing sections project at the proper angle with respect to the fuselage, thus simplifying the construction of the toy plane.

A'feature of thelpresent invention lies in the provision of a toy plane made of various parts carved or turned to approximately the correct In the formation of the plane the assembler must complete the forming and finishing of the various elements throughthe use'of sand paper or other finishing apparatus. At the same time, however, the various cooperating elements and certain portions thereof which inter-engage and which are accordingly provided with cooperating or interlocking elements are constructed to fit properly before the start'of the finishing operation. As a result these portions are preferably not finished at all in the forming and finishing operation, or at least are but slightly finished in order toiprovide a close fit.

:A further feature of the presentinvention lies in the fact that the various elements of the toy plane are slotted or notched to fit properly :with

other elements of the construction. .As .a-resuli the plane. may-beassembled with great ease-and the various parts of the plane will fit together properly regardless of whetheror notthe'firiishing job, or the rest of theplane surfaces areperfeet. As a result of thisconstruction'the outward appearance of the plane'and the degree of excellence in the appearance of the finishedtoy depends mainly upon the ability and workmanship of the assembler. At the same timefihowever, a relatively unskilled person may readily complete the plane construction .due .to the relative simplicity of assembly.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the manner in which the various elements of the assembly fit together to produce a finished article. While .each plane model may have individual characteristics and shapes, the general method of assembly of all ofthe variousplanes is extremely similar.

A further feature of thepresent invention lies in the fact thatthe wingsforming a part of my toy plane may be foldablyconnected to thefuselage in a manner to simulate the type of plane commonly used on aircraft carriers or the like.

These and other objects and novel features of my invention will be more clearly and 'fullyset forth in the following specification and claims.

In the drawings forming a part .of myspecification:

Figure lis a topplan view of a toy. plane showing the assembled arrangement .of the parts thereof.

Figure 2 is a top plan view in exploded lform showing the relationship of the various parts-before assembly thereof.

Figure 3 is a sectional view throughaportion of the plane, the position of the section being indicatedby the line 3-3 .of Figure .2.

Figure 4 is a sectional view through one .of the booms-of the plane, the position of the section being indicated by the line 4- 5 of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is asectional view through one of the -booms of the plane and through the portions thereof constructed'to simulate the radiators of a common type of plane.

Figured-is a side elevational view of .the fuselageof the toy plane.

Figure 7 is a side elevational view of one of thetail assembly portions of the plane.

.Figure fi is a sectional view'through the .end of one of the tailbooms, the position :of the section heingindicated by the lined-8 0i Figure 2.

Figureiiisa view similar to Figure 3.showin the aperture through the fuselage having rounded ends rather than square ends as in Figure 3.

Figure is a top plan view of a modified form of airplane construction.

Figure 11 is a side elevational view of the toy plane illustrated in Figure 10.

Figure 12 is a longitudinal section through the end of the fuselage of the plane shown in Figure 10, the position of the section being indicated by the line I2I2 of Figure 10.

Figure 13 illustrates in died-out form, a representation of a pilots compartment which may be adhered to the surface of the plane so as to make the plane appear more like a real airplane.

Figure 14 is an exploded view of a modified form of mid-wing section from the construction illustrated in Figures 1 and 2.

Figure 15 is a side elevational view of the fuselage used in conjunction with the mid-wing section illustrated in Figure 14.

Figure 16 is a bottom plan view of another modified form of airplane construction.

Figure 1'? is a front elevational view of the airplane illustrated in Figure 16.

Figure 18 is a perspective view of the connection between wing tip portions and the wing stubs connected to the fuselage.

Figure 19 is a side elevational view of a model flying boat.

Figure 20 is a top plan view of the flying boat illustrated in Figure 19.

Figure 21 is a front elevational view of the flying boat shown in Figures 19 and 20.

Figure 22 is a side elevational view of a motor mounting forming a part of the flying boat.

Figure 23 is a front elevational view of the motor mounting illustrated in Figure 22.

Figure 24 is a side elevational view of a spacing block formed between the hull and fuselage and the wing of the flying boat.

Figure 25 is a front elevational view of the spacing block shown in Figure 24.

Figure 26 is a side elevational view of the tail construction.

Figure 27 is a rear elevational view of the tail construction shown in Figure 26.

Figure 28 is a partial view of the adjacent ends of a flying boat wing.

The toy plane A illustrated in Figures 1 and 2 of the drawings includes a pair of substantially parallel booms I0 and II connected at their forward ends by a mid-wing section I2. The midwing section I2 has a cross-sectional shape simulating that of the usual wing section and having a rounded and thickened leading edge I3 tapered to a relatively narrow trailing edge I4. As the cross-sectional shape of an airplane wing is well known, the cross-sectional shape of the wing is not shown in great detail.

In the particular type of plane illustrated, the mid-wing section is of greatest width at its midpoint I5 and tapers in th conventional manner from this center point. The mid-wing section is provided with a pair of projections I6 and I! on the ends thereof designed to fit into elongated slots I9 and 20 of the booms Ill and II respectively. The usual shape of the slots I9 and 29 is indicated in Figures 3 and 9 of the drawings, and the projections I6 and I? are shaped to frictionally engage in these slots. In Figure 3 the slots I9 are square cornered, while in Figure 9 the slots are round ended, as illustrated.

The fuselage 2! of the plane A includes a.

pointed forward end which is preferably pointed or rounded, and the shape of the fuselage cor responds with that of the actual plane which the toy is designed to simulate. A hood portion 22 (see Figure 6) is provided projecting upwardly from the fuselage to simulate the hood extending over the pilot of the plane. A slot 23 extends longitudinally of the fuselage and the slot is shaped to conform with the shape of the wing section. In other words, the slot 23 is provided with a relatively thick forward end 24 and a relatively narrow or constricted rear end 25 to follow the contour of the mid-wing section. Because of the constriction 25 it is usually necessary to slide the fuselage onto the mid-wing section I2 from one end thereof, the fuselage frictionally engaging the wing at the center thereof.

The slots I9 and 20 preferably extend entirely through the booms I II and I I, respectively, transversely thereof. In preferred form, the slots I9 and 20 are slightly angular transversely so that the wings may incline upwardly from the booms to the wing tips. Wings 26 and 27 are provided with projecting end portions 29 and 30 respectively, which also engage into the slots I9 and 28 on the opposite side of the booms from the mid-wing section or on the. outer sides of the booms. The projecting portions 29 and 3f! frictionally engage in the slots I9 and 20 and are held in place without glue or other means.

As best illustrated in Figures 1 and 5 of the drawings, opposed notches 3| and 32 are provided in the booms I0 and II respectively, to support relatively short substantially semi-circular sections 33 and 34. These short sections 33 and 34 fit into the notches 3| and 32 and project outwardly beyond the contour of the booms I0 and I I to simulate the radiators ordinarily used on the booms of the planes which the present toy is designed to simulate. These projections 33 and 34 thus assist in making the appearance of the toy more realistic.

As illustrated in Figures 2 and 8 of the drawings the rear ends of the booms I0 and II are slotted transversely as Well as vertically. The transverse slots such as 35 in the booms III and I I are arranged to receive the forward or leading edge of the transverse fin 36 or tail stabilizing plane. This transverse fin 36 is shaped with rounded ends 31 to simulate in appearance the fin actually used on planes of the type which the present toy simulates. The fin 36 is provided with vertical slots 39 and 40 therein which align with the vertical slots 4| and 42 of the booms I0 and II respectively when the fin is engaged therein. The fin 36 is frictionally engaged in the slots 35 of the booms I0 and II in such a manner that the slots 39 and 4| are in alignment and so that the slots 40 and 42 are in alignment. The vertical fins 43 and 44 of the tail assembly are slotted as indicated at 45 in the forward edge of these fins. The fins are designed to engage in the slots 39 and 49, the slots 45 embracing the forward portion of the fin 36 exposed through the slots M and 42. In other words, the vertical fins 43 and 44 intermesh with both the transverse fin 36 and the slots 4| and 42 of the booms I0 and II.

In construction, the parts of the plane A are carved or turned out to the approximate size and shape. These parts may be assembled in the form in which they are supplied. However, in order to better the appearance of the plane, it is preferable to sand the surfaces of the various parts, care being taken not to materially change the shape or size of the parts of the plane de- Signed to interfit with others of the parts. For example, in sanding the midewin section l 2, care must be taken not to materially change the thickness of the central portion of the midewing section designed to be embraced by the fuselage 2!, and also care must be taken not to materially change the size and shape of the projections l5 and I1. In the manufacture of the fuselage 2f the slot 23 is out slightly undersize so that the wood must spread slightly while being moved slidably into its proper position. If difficulty is experienced in sliding the fuselage into place the surface of the mid-wing section is lightly sanded until the fuselage may be forced into place to remain in proper position by friction.

Similarly, when furnished, the projections H5 and I! are of substantially the proper dimensions to frictionally engage into the slots 19 and 20. Therefore care must be taken not to sand the projections sumciently to change the shape of the projections and therefore lose the frictional connection between the boom and the mid-sections.

The entire exposed surface of the fuselage and the booms maybe sanded with the exception of the interior of the notches 3| and 32 and the notches 35, M and 42. As these notches embrace cooperating portions of the plane, the dimension of the notches should not be increased by sanding to any material extent.

It should also be noted that the portions of the transverse fin 36 embraced by the slots and should not be reduced in thickness sufficiently to prevent a tight fit between these parts.

After the sanding of all of the various parts of the toy, it may be assembled in the manner described and illustrated. Some slight sanding is sometimes desirable in order to insure a proper fit of the various elements. After the various parts have been properly secured together the exterior surface of the plane may be decorated to simulate in color and design the appearance of the plane which the toy is presumed to follow in design.

In Figures 10 through 13 of the drawings I disclose a modified form'of plane B which is somewhat diiferent in construction from that previously described. The plane B includes a fuselage 46 having a slot M therethrough. This slot is somewhat V-shaped transversely so that the wings may incline upwardly. Wings 49 and 50 are provided with projections 5! and 52 respectively, which frictionally engage in the slot 41. The slot 51 may be of the general cross-sectional shape disclosed in Figure 3 of the drawings or Figure 9 illustrating the slot l9 The fuselage 46 is carved to the shape and contour of the fuselage of an actual plane in common use. For example the plane is shaped at 53 to simulate the shape of the pilots compartment of the plane. The fuselage '56 preferably tapers toward the tail end thereof as illustrated, and a transverse slot 54 extends through the rear end of the fuselage so as to frictionally engage the transversely extending tail member 55. A slot 56 is provided in the fuselage 45 communicating with the slot 54 and extending upwardly therefrom to accommodate the vertical tail member 51. The tail members and 57 are shaped to simulate the tail assembly of the type of plane which the toy B simulates.

Two tapered partially cylindrical bodies 59 and 60 are mounted on the wings 45 and 50 to provide the general appearance of motors. As illustrated in Figure 10 of the drawings, longitudinal slots 6| are cut in the bodies 59 and 50 to receive the i D Wt ld 941%? f 3? ng -9 and .5 A th w nes is nd 5 a e of subs nt all eq al thickness hro ho t the fo war arties 9 their length and as the under-surface of the wings is substantially flat the motor housing 59 and the motor housing 59 are so slotted that the slot may be of substantially equal thickness throughout the length thereof. If in any desired plane construction th motor housings extend a greater distance from the leading edge of the plane along the upper surface of the wings, the slots El may be tapered similarly to the taper .of the slots 23 of the fuselage 2! previously .described and the motors may then be slidably positioned by urging the motors onto the wings from the ends of the wings. However, due ,tQthe fact that the portions of the housings lying against the upper surfaces of the wing-s extend .only slightly more than half the width of the wings the slots Bl can usually be .of similar thickness throughout their length.

In order to better conform with the actual appearance of a plane, I may provide flexible cut out members such as 58, illustrated in Figure 13 of the drawings, to be secured or adhered to the surface of the plane. The cut out member 58 is provided with a substantially rectangular body portion designed to be adhered over the portion 53 of the fuselage, and a substantially fan shaped portion is secured to this rectangular body to extend over the portion of the fuselage designed to provide the appearance of a windshield. This member '58 maybe formed of any suitable mate-.-

-rial such as paper, cellophane, or the like, or

may be any combination of these elements. The members 58 are printed to simulate the windows of the pilots compartment and actually give this appearance when adhered in place. Side Windows such as 68 may be mounted on the sides .of the fuselage, and similarly insignia of various sorts may be secured in proper position both to the fuselage and the wings. These members 58 and 63 may be in the form of transfers or may be gummed on one surface if desired so that they may be properly adhered in place.

In Figures 14 and 15 of the drawings I disclose a mid-wing and fuselage arrangement C, which may take the place of the mid-wing section l2 of the fuselage 2!. In this modified construction the fuselage 52 may be shaped similarly to the fuselage 2|, with the exception that in place of the slot 23 I provide a slot 53 which extends transversely entirely through the fuselage. 'In this respect the slot 53 resembles the slots l9 and 20 at the forward ends of the booms ill and H of the plane A.

A pair of mid-Wing sections 5 3 and 55, which are of a cross-section similar to the cross-section of the mid-wing section l2 of the plane A, are secured to the fuselage (i2 by means of the projecting portions 56 and 6'! which frictionally engage in the slot '53. Thus when the projections 66 and 67 are interlocked in the slot 63 of the fuselage 62, a mid-wing section is formed which simulates in shape and size the mid-wing section I2 of the plane A. I

Projections 69 and '50 are provided on the sections 65 and 65 to take the place of the projections l6 and ll of the mid-wing section 12. Thus when the two mid-wing sections and fuselage 62 are assembled they may be substituted for the mid-wing section l2 and fuselage 2| of the plane A.

Another modified form of construction is illus'a trated in Figures 16, 17, and 18 of the drawings.

In this type of plane, illustrated in general by the letter D, the fuselage H is provided with an elongated slot 12 extending therethrough. The slot 12 is of an inverted V-shape, as best illustrated in Figure ll of the drawings and extends transversely of the fuselage.

Stub wing sections 13 and 14 are provided with projections 15 and 16 which extend into opposite ends of the slot 12 to engage frictionally in place. The stub wing sections 13 and M are provided with a series of spaced parallel rfingers l1 and 19 which extend outwardly therefrom and taper from the full thickness of the stub wingsection to a point at the extreme ends thereof.

Wing tip portions 80 and 8! are likewise provided with a series of parallel fingers 82 and 83, respectively, which dovetail between the fingers l1 and 79. The fingers 82 and 83 extend from the full width of the wing tip sections to points at their extreme ends. With this type of construction, as illustrated in the drawings, the wings may be continuously unbroken in appearance when the wings are in the open position illustrated in Figure 16 and in full lines in Figure 17 of the drawings. However, the wings may be pivoted into folded position illustrated in dotted outline in Figure 17, in the manner best indicated in Figure 18 of the drawings. The wing tips 80 and 8| frictionally engage with the stub wing sections 13 and M. The fingers ll frictionally engage between the fingers 82. Similarly the fingers l9 frictionally engage between the fingers 83. Opposed pivots 84 connect the wing tip 80 to the stub wing 13, while similar opposed pivots 85 connect the wing tips 8| with the stub wings 14. These pivots 84 and 85 may be omitted if desired, particularly if the wings are not to be folded as illustrated in dotted outline in Figure 17.

The tongue and groove connection thus described has two important advantages. In the first place it provides a wing which may be folded if it is so desired. In the second place by this construction a Wing may be formed out of a relatively thin piece of material, and a thick block is not required to provide the inverted gull wing construction illustrated.

In Figures 19 through 28, I disclose another modified form of toy airplane construction. The model plane E is a replica of a flying boat in common use. In this construction I provide a hull and fuselage 86 having a pilots compartment 8? and a hull construction 89 simulating that of the actual plane which the model E simulates. Projecting compartments 92 are provided on the hulls. These projections, as well as the pilots compartment and other portions of the plane, may be painted or decorated with suitable transfers to simulate as closely as possible the appearance of an actual plane.

A flat shelf 9! is provided on the top of the fuselage and a central recess 92 is formed in this shelf. A spacing block 93 is arranged to rest upon this shelf 9| and is shaped to continue the contour of the fuselage as best illustrated in Figures 19 and 21 of the drawings. The spacing block 93 is provided with an integral projection 94 shaped to extend into the recess 92 and the interlocking of the projection 94 and recess 92 act to hold the spacing block 93 in its proper position.

The wings 95 and 96 are provided with a tongue and groove connection best illustrated in Figures 21 and 28 of the drawings. The wing 95 is provided with a slot 9! in its end which is designed 8 to accommodate a tongue SS on the end of the wing $6. The tongue 99 and groove 9? provide a tongue and groove connection having a smooth continuous exterior surface and providing an interlocking action at the ends of the wings to hold these wings in proper relationship.

The spacer block 53 is provided with an integral projection I50 which extends upwardly therefrom. The wing 95 is slotted adjacent its outt end at E53! and the tongue 99 is also slotted at I62 adjacent the end of the wing. These slots are so positioned that when the two wings are assembled together the slots S61 and 592 are in registry to receive the projection 486 of the spacer block 93. As a result when the wings are assembled the spacer block holds the wings from separation.

In order to assist in supporting the wings, struts H13 and 524 are provided. These struts are provided with projections I95 and 66 respectively, which fit into receiving sockets on the side of the fuselage 86. The struts $03 and ice are similarly provided with projections l9? and :69 which extend into suitable recesses in the under surfaces of the wings $5 and As a result the wings are efiectively braced by these struts 03 and 104.

A pair of motors are mounted on the leading edges of the wings 95 and 96. These motors H0 are each provided with a cylindrical forward end Ill and a tapering rear end portion H2. The motors HQ are axially slotted at H3 to receive the forward or leading edge of a wing 95 or 95 and the forward edge of the wing may be filed or carved flat in order to receive these motors.

At the rear end of the fuselage I provide a second fiat table portion H8 having a central well or recess H4 therein. The tail rudder H5 is provided with an integral downwardly extending projection H6 designed to extend into the well H 4, to hold the rudder H5 in vertical position. The rudder H5 is shaped similarly to the tail section of the plane being simulated. and a transverse slot I I! extends therethrough. as best illustrated in Figure 26 of the drawings. A transverse plane element 5 19 extends through the slot ill and is frictionally engaged therein.

The flying boat E when completed very closely approaches in appearance the actual flying boat which it simulates. The manner of assembly of the boat is very similar to that of other constructions with the exception that in the model E. the two wings are directly connected together by a part of the fuselage or by the spacing block which in reality forms a part thereof. The motors are mounted in much the same manner as with the previously described. motors and the tail assembly is somewhat similar to that of other planes described.

The use of out-out members, such as 58 in the form of decalcoinania which may be applied to the surface of the plane is believed an important feature of the present invention. These decalcomania may be printed to provide the proper exterior appearance and shaped to the contour of the plane surfaces to which they are applied so as to simulate the actual appearance of a plane. It is believed novel to employ such decalcomania on an article of this type.

In accordance with the patent statutes, I have described the principles of construction and op eration of my toy airplane, and while I have endeavored to set forth the best embodiments thereof, I desire to have it understood that obvious changes may be made within the scope of 9 the following claims without departing from the spirit of my invention.

I claim:

1. A toy airplane comprising a pair of elongated booms, a mid-wing section between said booms with the ends thereof abutting said booms, slots in said booms extending crosswise therethrough, projections on said mid-wing section extending into said slots, wing sections having an end abutting a corresponding boom and each outwardly of said booms including a projection engageable in one of said slots, and a fuselage mounted upon said mid-wing section.

2. A toy plane comprising a pair of elongated booms, a mid-wing section connecting said booms with the ends thereof abutting said booms, said mid-wing section having an air foil shaped body, a slot in each of said booms extending crosswise therethrough, a projection on each end of said mid-wing section designed to extend into one of said slots, a fuselage intermediate said booms, said fuselage including an elongated slot shaped to embrace the air foil shaped body of said midwing section, and opposed wings outwardly of said booms each abutting a corresponding boom and including a projection extending into one of said slots.

3. A toy plane comprising a pair of elongated booms, a slot in each of said booms extending crosswise thereof, a mid-wing section between said booms with the ends thereof abutting said booms, projections on said mid-wing section extending into said slots, opposed wings outwardly of said booms including projections extending into said slots, opposed transverse notches in each of said booms, and rounded blocks friotionally engaged in each of said notches to project beyond the contour of said booms.

4. A toy plane comprising a pair of elongated booms, a mid-wing section between said booms, a slot in each of said booms extending crosswise thereof, oppositely disposed projections on said mid-wing section engaging into said slots, opposed wings outwardly of said booms, projections on said wings extending into said slots, a transverse slot at the end of each of said booms, a transverse fin connecting said booms, said fin engaging in each of said last mentioned slots and terminating outwardly of said booms, and a vertical fin including a notch embracing a portion of said transverse fin.

5. A toy plane comprising a pair of elongated booms, a. mid-wing section between said booms, slots in said booms extending crosswise thereof, projections on said mid-wing section engageable in said slots, wings projecting outwardly from said booms,projections onsaid wings engageable in said slots, a transverse slot at the rear end of each of said booms, a transverse fin engaged in said last mentioned slots, a vertical slot adjacent each end of said transverse fin, and a vertical fin near each end of said transverse fin, said vertical fins each including a slot arranged to embrace a portion of said transverse fin, said vertical slots embracing portions of said vertical fins.

6. A toy plane comprising a pair of spaced booms, a mid-wing section between said booms, longitudinally extending slots in said booms,

' wings projecting outwardly from said booms and including projections engaged in said slots, a transverse slot at the rear end of each of said booms, a vertical slot in the rear end of each of said booms, a transverse fin engaged in said transi6 verse slots, said transverse fin including vertical slots aligned with the vertical slots in said booms, vertical fins having transverse slots therein arranged to embrace a portion of said transverse fin, the portions of said vertical fins adjacent the slots therein being embraced by the vertical slots in said booms, and the vertical slots in said transverse fin embracing portions of said vertical fin.

7. A tail assembly for a toy plane having a pair of spaced parallel booms, said booms having longitudinally extending transverse slots at the rear ends and vertical slots at the rear ends, a transverse fin engaged in said transverse slots, vertical slots in said transverse fin aligned with the vertical slots in said booms, and vertical fins having slots therein to embrace a portion of said transverse fin, the vertical slots in said transverse fins and in said booms embracing portions of said vertical fins.

8. A toy plane comprising a longitudinally extending body member, a transverse angular slot extending therethrough, opposed wing sections on opposite sides of said body member, said slot being substantially shorter than the adjoining portions of the wing sections, and elongated projections on said wing sections spaced from both the front and rear wing edges frictionally engaged in opposed relation into said slot, both ends of the wings adjacent the projections abutting the body member.

9. A toy airplane comprising an elongated body member, a substantially rectangular slot in said body member extending crosswise of the body, a pair of opposed wing sections on opposite sides of said body member, and projections on said wing sections substantially smaller than the win sections and spaced from both the front and rear wing edges, said sections being frictionally engaged in said slot in opposed relation, the forward and rearward ends of the wing sections abutting said body member on opposite sides of said slot.

10. A toy plane comprising a pair of elongated booms, a mid-wing air foil section between said booms with the ends thereof abutting said booms, slots in said booms extending crosswise therethrough, projections on said mid-wing section extending into said slots, wing sections outwardly of said booms, each having an end abutting a corresponding boom and including a projection engageable in one of said slots.

EDWARD F. SANDS, JR.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,581,646 Larsen Apr. 20, 1926 1,758,399 Hodgdon May 13, 1930 1,771,397 Chluda July 29, 1930 2,115,315 Muller et al Apr, 16, 1938 2,236,456 Stockham Mar. 25, 1941 2,275,094 Taylor Mar. 3, 1942 2,354,392 McCoy July 25, 1944 2,397,364 Myers Mar. 26, 1945 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 11,881 Germany of 1880 85,355 Austria Aug. 25, 1921

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1581646 *Apr 14, 1924Apr 20, 1926Larsen Carl ChristianStructural toy
US1758399 *Sep 24, 1928May 13, 1930Hodgdon Theodore AToy airplane
US1771397 *Nov 7, 1928Jul 29, 1930John ChludaToy aeroplane
US2115315 *Mar 10, 1937Apr 26, 1938MullerToy or amusement device
US2236456 *Mar 7, 1940Mar 25, 1941Stockham Jr William RobertAirplane construction set
US2275094 *Apr 30, 1940Mar 3, 1942Paul K GuillowToy biplane
US2354392 *Sep 30, 1942Jul 25, 1944Mccoy Howard MIntegrated model airplane
US2397364 *May 20, 1944Mar 26, 1946Gen Mills IncToy airplane
AT85355B * Title not available
*DE11881C Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2724211 *May 24, 1952Nov 22, 1955Bloom LouisToy aircraft wing construction
US3366354 *Oct 11, 1965Jan 30, 1968Antonin M. SterbaToy airplane or glider construction
US4500299 *May 19, 1983Feb 19, 1985Mattel, Inc.Toy cargo plane
US6257946 *Dec 23, 1999Jul 10, 2001Ming-Ting YangToy airplane
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/88
International ClassificationA63H27/00, A63H27/18
Cooperative ClassificationA63H27/02
European ClassificationA63H27/02