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Publication numberUS2551384 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 1, 1951
Filing dateMay 22, 1948
Priority dateMay 22, 1948
Publication numberUS 2551384 A, US 2551384A, US-A-2551384, US2551384 A, US2551384A
InventorsEarl F Middleton, Carl W Middleton
Original AssigneeEarl F Middleton, Carl W Middleton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Holding ring
US 2551384 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1951 E. F. MIDDLETON ET AL 2,551,384

HOLDING RING Filed May 22, 1948 Z INVE T R5 n dga q -MW AT ORNEY Patented May 1, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE HOLDING RING Application May 22, 1948, Serial No. 28,636

4 Claims.

The invention herein disclosed relates to a holding ring that is especially suitable for holding curtains, tapestry, blankets and the like.

Curtains, tapestry and the like are frequently provided with openings through which they are suspended from rods by holding rings that surround the rods. Blankets, especially for a baby's crib, may also be provided with openings adjacent the edges or corners, through which openings they may be loosely secured to the rods or rails of the crib.

It is an object of this invention to provide a split holding ring for such purposes. Another object of the invention is to provide a holding ring of this kind that is provided with a simple and effective locking arrangement. A further object of the invention is to provide a ring of the kind mentioned that is economical to manufacture and that is attractive in appearance.

The foregoing objects and certain advantages that will hereinafter appear are realized in the holding ring, constituting one specific example of an embodiment of the invention, that is illustrated in the accompanying drawing and described in detail below.

The drawing includes:

Fig. 1 which is an isometric view of a holding ring embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 which is a plan view of the same;

Fig. 3 which is a side elevation of the same;

Fig. 4 which is a fragmentary, side elevation showing the ring with the ends thereof separated;

Fig. 5 which is a plan view illustrating the initial step in securing the ends of the ring together;

Fig. 6 which is an enlarged, fragmentary elevation showing the relation of the interengaging lips just prior to securing the ends of the ring.

The particular holding ring illustrated in the drawing consists of a narrow strip l of resilient and flexible material. The ring may be formed from any suitable material such, for example, as metal or a thermo-plastic that is resilient and flexible. Holding rings of the kind shown in the drawing and made from cellulose acetate have proven to be highly satisfactory for the purpose.

At the ends of the strip I, there are interengaging lips which, when properly arranged, interengage to hold the and sections of the strip together. Desirably, the strip is pre-formed in the shape of a ring of greater circumference than the length of the strip. Thus, when the end portions of the strip overlap there is a tendency for them to separate. This tendency of the ends to separate is utilized in eifecting the locking of the ends together to form a closed ring.

Adjacent the end edge 2 of the strip I, there is formed a laterally extending lug or lip 3 which extends laterally of the plane of the strip from the side edge 4 of the strip. The length of the lip 3 is approximately the same as the thickness of the strip, and the width of the lip 3 is slightly greater than the thickness of the strip. In the closed position of the ring, the lip 3 extends along and engages the side edge 4 of the end portion 5 of the strip.

The end portion 5 of the strip is provided with spaced, oppositely disposed, overhanging lips 6 and l. The lip 6 is adjacent the end edge 8 of the strip. This lip extends laterally from the side edge 4 of the strip and inwardly to overhang the strip. The laterally extending portion 9 of the lip is of such length that the inwardly extending portion In thereof is spaced from the strip a distance but slightly greater than the thickness of the strip. The lip I is spaced longitudinally or circumferentially of the strip, from the lip 6 and extends laterally from the opposite side edge of the strip and inwardly to overhang the strip. Like the lip 6, the laterally extending portion ll of the lip l is of such length that the overhanging portion I2 of the lip is spaced from the strip a distance but slightly greater, approximately the same as, the thickness of the strip. The length of the inwardly extending portion In and I2 of the lips 6 and l are approximately half the width of the strip.

As will be seen from Figures 1, 2 and 3, in the closed position of the ring, the end portion of the strip having the lip 3 thereon is engaged under the overhanging portion of the lips B and I. The lip 3 engages the side edge 4 of the strip and thus prevents pivotal or sidewise movements of the end portion of the strip. Due to the tendency of the ring to open up, the lip 3 is held against the edge of lip I. In this position, the lip 3 is of sufficient length to engage the side edge of the strip. The lips B and I restrain the ring from opening up and also with the lip 3 stop sidewards or pivotal movement of the end sections of the ring.

To open the ring, the ring is compressed. Upon compression of the ring, and due to its curvature, the lip 3 is released from the side edge of the strip as illustrated in Fig. 6. The end section of the ring containing the lip 3 can then be twisted or pivoted to a position comparable to that shown in Figure 5. In this position, the end section is released from the lip 6 and can he slipped out from under the lip 1. When the end sections are thus disengaged and the ring is released, the end edges will separate as shown in Fig. 4, due to the resiliency of the ring and the fact that it was pre-formed in the shape of a ring of greater circumference than the length of the strip.

With the ring open, one end portion may be inserted through the opening in a curtain, tapestry or blanket and the ring sprung apart to encompass the rod or rail as the case may be. The ring may then be closed and locked in the closed position by reversing the operation performed and described above for opening the ring. To close the ring, the end section containing the lip 3 is brought to the position shown in Fig. 5. The end section is then allowed to straighten out and is brought under the lip 6. With the end section thus arranged, the ring is released. It assumes the position shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 in which the end sections are locked together.

From the foregoing description of the embodiment of the invention disclosed in the drawing and described above, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that by this invention there is provided a split holding ring of the kind mentioned that has an eii'ective locking arrangement; and that will not accidentall become displaced and the ring opened. It will also be apparent that by this invention there is provided a holding ring that is simple in construction and economical to manufacture.

It will be obvious that various changes may be made by those skilled in the art in the details of the embodiment of the invention illustrated in the drawing and described above within the principle and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A holding ring oi the kind described for holding curtains, tapestry, blankets and the like which holding ring consists of a strip of resilient material and including longitudinally spaced oppositely extending, overhanging lips adjacent one end of the strip, the said lips being spaced from the strip an amount substantially equal to the thickness of the strip and a lip extending laterally of the strip from one side edge thereof and adjacent the other end of the strip.

2. A holding ring of the kind described for holding curtains, tapestry, blankets and the like which holding ring consists of a strip of resilient material pre-i'ormed in the shape of a ring and including longitudinally spaced, overhanging lips adjacent one end of the strip and extending from opposite side edges thereof, the said lips being spaced from the strip an amount substantially equal to the thickness of the strip, and a lip extending laterally of the strip from one side edge thereof adjacent the other end of the strip.

3. A holding ring of the kind described for holding curtains, tapestry, blankets and the like which holding ring consists of a narrow strip of resilient and flexible material pre-formed in the shape of a ring of larger circumference than the length of the strip and including interlocking lips comprising longitudinally spaced, overhanging lips adjacent one end of the strip and extending from opposite side edges of the strip, the said lips being spaced from the strip an amount substantially equal to the thickness of the strip, and a lip extending laterally of the strip from one side edge thereof and adjacent the other end of the strip.

4. A holding ring of the kind described for holding curtains, tapestry, blankets and the like which holding ring consists of a narrow strip of resilient and flexible material pre-iormed in the shape of a ring of smaller circumference than the length of the strip and including interlocking lips comprising an overhanging lip at one end of the strip extending from one side edge of the strip, another overhanging lip spaced longitudially from the first mentioned lip and extending from the other side edge of the strip, and a lip at the other end of the strip, extending laterally of the strip from the side edge thereof from which said second mentioned strip extends.

EARL F. MIDDLETON. CARL W. MIDDLETON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references arc of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 150,238 Hagaman Apr. 28, 1874 1,881,081 Keidel Oct. 4, 1932

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US150238 *Feb 28, 1874Apr 28, 1874 Improvement in bale-ties
US1881081 *May 16, 1931Oct 4, 1932Internat Seal And Knot ProtectSeal
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3324592 *Dec 27, 1965Jun 13, 1967Milton PrennerPlant support
US4750241 *Mar 19, 1987Jun 14, 1988Critchley LimitedCable ties
US4782612 *Jul 21, 1986Nov 8, 1988Eidmann James FIdentification tag
US4792253 *Aug 31, 1987Dec 20, 1988Jacobson Ralph SBinder ring having slip-on folio stops
US5216784 *Jun 1, 1992Jun 8, 1993Tyton CorporationConduit clamp
US5488760 *Jun 17, 1994Feb 6, 1996Band-It-Idex, Inc.Inner lock band clamp
US6494248 *Jul 17, 2000Dec 17, 2002Zahner Design Group, Ltd.Suspended materials having external slits
US6845644 *Aug 21, 2003Jan 25, 2005James D. BucknerLocking assembly
US7263745 *Aug 2, 2005Sep 4, 2007Kenji MoriBinding band
US7296609Aug 23, 2005Nov 20, 2007Zahner Design Group, Ltd.Hanging products
US8146212Feb 3, 2009Apr 3, 2012Band-It-Idex, Inc.Free end band
US8235088Aug 7, 2012Zahner Design Group, Ltd.Hanging products
US8356641Jan 22, 2013Band-It-Idex, Inc.Stationary band clamping apparatus
US8402800 *Mar 1, 2012Mar 26, 2013David D. HesterKey with releasable shackle
US8424166Apr 23, 2013Band-It-Idex, Inc.Dual locking band clamp and method of forming the same
US20060037721 *Aug 23, 2005Feb 23, 2006David ZahnerHanging products
US20070028425 *Aug 2, 2005Feb 8, 2007Kenji MoriBinding band
US20080202710 *Oct 29, 2007Aug 28, 2008David ZahnerHanging products
US20090114308 *Oct 15, 2008May 7, 2009Miklos Balazs MarelinStationary band clamping apparatus
US20090144947 *Nov 3, 2008Jun 11, 2009Casey James DornemanDual locking band clamp and method of forming the same
US20090271956 *Feb 3, 2009Nov 5, 2009Nelson Daniel JFree end band
US20140259543 *Mar 15, 2013Sep 18, 2014William M. ScottCable ties
USD668091Oct 2, 2012Zahner Design Group, Ltd.Shower curtain
USD746078Jun 17, 2015Dec 29, 2015Zahner Design Group, Ltd.Shower curtain
Classifications
U.S. Classification16/87.2, 70/458, 63/11, 63/DIG.300, 24/16.0PB, 24/20.0EE, 24/72.5
International ClassificationA47H19/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S63/03, A47H19/00
European ClassificationA47H19/00