Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2552271 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 8, 1951
Filing dateOct 4, 1946
Priority dateDec 27, 1945
Also published asUS2527923
Publication numberUS 2552271 A, US 2552271A, US-A-2552271, US2552271 A, US2552271A
InventorsHerbert W Faus
Original AssigneeHerbert W Faus
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cartridge for hot-bearing or hotbox alarms or indicators
US 2552271 A
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1951 H. w. FAUS 2,552,271

CARTRIDGE FOR HOT-BEARING 0R HOTBOX ALARMS 0R INDICATORS Original Filed Dec. 27, 1945 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 I W 7% if a /1/ 4 7 1 32 /1 W I 37 g 'z j 1 32 I /I W /2 2 INVENTOR." Herbert W- Faus,

y 1951 H. w. FAUS 2,552,271

' CARTRIDGE FOR HOT-BEARING ORHOTBOX ALARMS OR INDICATORS Original Filed Dec. 27, 1945 s Sheet's-Sfi eet 2 INVENTOR. Herbert W Fau 5 BY a; Q, m

A TTOR/Vt).

y 1951 H. w. FAUS 2,552,271 CARTRIDGE FOR HOT-BEARING 0R uorsox ALARMS ox mnxcxroas Original Filed Dec. 27, 1945 "KSh e ets-Sheat s Patented May 8, 1951 CARTRHDGE FOR HGT-BEARING OR HOTBOX ALARMS OR INDICATORS Herbert W. Faus, White Plains, N. Y.

Original application December 27, 1945, Serial No.

637,401. Divided and this application October 4, 1946, Serial No. 701,097

This invention relates to hot hearing or hotbox indicators and particularly to cartridges for use in hot bearing or hot box alarms or indicators of the character disclosed in my prior United States Patent No. 1,979,875, dated November 6, 1934, and in my prior United States application for patent Serial No. 637,401, filed December 27, 1945 now Patent No. 2,527,923, of which this ap-' plication is a division.

In my aforesaid Patent No. 1,979,875, there is exemplificatively disclosed a journal box or locomotive driving box containing a bearing having one or more pockets closed by fusible elements or plugs, which melt when the bearing reaches a predetermined temperature and release material which is readily noticeable for indicating a hot bearing or hot box, the box or its lid being desirably formed for venting said material while retarding the entrance of dirt or other foreign substances into the box. This material may be of a character to give a readily noticeable warning either by the development of a cloud of smoke, the production of a distinctive or pervasive odor. or both. The structure shown in this patent is efiicient for its purpose but is open to the disadvantage that upon the discharge of the material contained in a pocket in use, when giving an alarm, the pocket formed directly in the bearing itself must be recharged and this must be done at the point where the bearing happens to be, which, in case of the use of the bearing on a traveling body, such as in the journal box of a railway car truck, for example, cannot always be conveniently done. Similar inconveniences or disadvantages also apply to the patented construction in the required recharging of a spent pocket in a bearing of a stationary object, such a piece of machinery.

In my aforesaid application, Serial No. 637 ,401, I have disclosed and claimed a construction of bearing and associated means for overcoming the objections to the prior patented construction, and wherein cartridges containing the signal producing material or materials are provided to fit and to be held within the pocket or pockets formed in the bearing so as to allow charging and recharging of the bearing to be performed in a ready, quick and convenient manner.

The present application relates to the construction of the cartridge per se, and one of its objects is to provide a removable or replaceable cartridge containing signal producing material held confined therein by fusible means melted when the bearing reaches a predetermined elevated temperature to release the material for a hot bearing indicating action.

13 Claims. (Cl. 116114.5)

A further object of the invention is to provide a cartridge of the character described containing a vaporizable signal producing material and which is so constructed that the heat of the overheated bearing will be transmitted as quickly as possible from the rubbing surface of the bearing to the fusible closure means of the cartridge to vaporize the material and melt the fusible closure means to allow free escape of the vaporized signal material to the atmosphere.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a cartridge of the character described which embodies a novel construction of stopper or sealing means having a metering orifice for regulating the discharge of the material and which is normally closed by a fusible element adapted to securely seal the orifice against leakage of the material.

With these and other objects in view, which will appear in the course of the subjoined description, the invention consists of the novel features of construction, combination and arrangement of parts hereinafter more fully described and claimed, and as exemplificatively shown in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary vertical longitudinal section through a journal box, an associated journal bearing and associated parts embodying my invention.

Fig. 2 is a vertical longitudinal section on an enlarged scale through the bearing removed from the journal box and showing one of the cells or pockets and a charge containing cartridge fitted therein.

Fig. 3 is a top plan view of the bearing with parts broken away and in section to show the arrangement of the cartridge containing cells or pockets and the cartridges disposed therein.

Fig. 4 is a front end elevation of the parts shown in Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a vertical transverse section of the same.

Fig. 6 is alcngitudinal section through-the odor producing cartridge, showing the same in sealed condition but with the odor producing charge omitted.

Fig. 7 is a longitudinal section through the cartridge sealing closure on an enlarged scale.

Fig. 8 is a rear end elevation of the sealing closure shown in Fig. 7.

Fig. 9 is an enlarged longitudinal section through the discharge end of the cartridge and the sealing closure seat ring secured therein.

Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 6 of the smoke producing cartridge.

Figs. 11 and 12 are views similar to Figs. 7 and 3 8 of the sealing closure of the smoke producing cartridge.

Hot bearings, generally designated as hot boxes, are one of the most frequent causes of derailm-ents and train delays on railways today. On one large railway system during the year 1929, seventy hot-boxes on cars and locomotives were not detected until the journal melted 01f. Thirtythree of these resulted in serious derailments. During the same year, twelve locomotive driving axles failed. Most of these failures were caused by overheating. With the increase in length of trains and speed of operation, and as a result of the success which has attended efforts to make journal box lids fit as tightly as possible in order to exclude dirt from the bearings, it has become more and more difficult for the train crew to detect a hot-box in time to avoid serious consequences. With the shorter trains, lower speeds and loose fitting journal box lids formerly prevalent, the trainmen were usually able to see or smell the smoke from over-heated lubricating oil or grease in time to stop the train before any serious damage was done.

For the above reasons, a serious need has arisen for the provision of some device which will attract the attention of a machine operator or a reasonably diligent train crew, crossing watchman, tower man, or the crew of a passing train, to an over-heated bearing, at the earliest possible moment, in order that attention may be given to pr vent injury to the journal or bearing.

I have, therefore, invented a replaceable oartridge type of device to give a definite signal to the train crew whenever any bearing equipped therewith becomes heated to a specific predeter mined temperature. Such temperature must be above the normal operating temperature of the bearing, but below that at which the physical properties of the material of the journal and axle begin to be adversely affected. Investigation has shown that the normal temperature of oil lubricated car journals varies from atmospheric temperature up to about 150 F. The device which I have invented is adapted to give a warning signal to the train crew automatically when the bearing reaches a temperature sulficiently high to melt the fusible material but below that which cause injury to hearing or axle, so that ample time will be available before any damage is done. Even under former conditions of operation, when the trainmen were able to depend upon their ability to smell or see the smoke from burning lubricating oil, it was seldom possible to detect the hot-box and stop the train before the bearing had been destroyed and the axle permanently injured. A device constructed in accordance with my invention will give a Warning to the train crew and permit the train to be stopped even before the oil begins to burn.

In carrying my invention into practice I provide a hot bearing or hot-box alarm or indicator, preferably comprising two containers or cartridges which are placed in cavities, cells or poohets formed in the bearing for their reception. Each cartridge is filled with a diiferent liquid or material and has a small orifice sealed with fusible metal, which melts at a predetermined temperature and releases the material. At this temperature the material vaporizes as fast as is can escape through the orifice. The material contained in one cartridge produces a distinctive and penetrating odor, while the material contained in the other cartridge produces a dense white smoke, both of which give warning of an overheated bearing. The discharge continues until both cartridges are empty, which requires from five to ten minutes.

The liquid used to produce the odor is preferably ethyl mercaptan, and the smoke producing liquid is preferably a mixture of titanium tetrachloride and carbon tetrachloride. The gases from both of these liquids are non-corrosive and can be inhaled within reasonable limits without harmful effects.

For the fusible element, the melting temperatures that have been found most satisfactory are 220 F. for roller bearing applications, 320 F. for waste packed friction bearings, and 450 F. for grease lubricated friction bearings. All three of these temperatures are substantially above the normal running temperature of bearings of the respective types. Extensive tests in railroad practice have shown that carbon steel axles in the normal 40-55 carbon range are not adversely affected by temperatures up to 525 F.

The fusible metal employed has a composition determined by the temperature at which the alarm is designed to function. Suitable compositions for the fusible metal are as follows:

Fusible Metal Melting Point Composition ings.

The loaded cartridges may be initially placed in the bearing by the bearing manufacturer or by the bearing installer or user and require no attention thereafter until they are discharged by an overheated bearing, when they are replaced by new cartridges. This may be done without the use of charging means wherever the bearing happens to be, by simply extracting the spent cartridges and inserting charged cartridges in their place.

Referring now more fully to the drawings for a detailed description of the invention, 1 designates a journal box provided with a hinge lug 2 and a lid 3 pivotally connected to said lug by means of a hinge pin or pintle 4. Received in the box is an associated journal 5 normally in engagement with a bearing 5 between which and the top of the box is disposed a usual form of wedge The lid 3 closes the outer opening in the box and a dust guard 3 of any desired character may close the inner opening around the axle 9.

In the embodiment of my invention as illustrated, the bearing 6 is provided with a pair of longitudinally extending cavities, cells or pools".- ets ii) and H, preferably arranged on opposite sides of the longitudinal center of the bearing and extending nearly the full length of the bearing parallel with or substantially parallel with the bearing surface of the bearing, each pocket being closed at its inner end i2, and opening at its outer inlet and exit end through the front of the bearing, where the mouth portion of the pocket is counterbored or enlarged to form a keeper recess l3 and an abutment shoulder is. These pockets are formed to respectively receive the cartridges l5 and I5 containing charges of the liquids or materials for respectively producing an odorous vapor and a smoke-like vapor, as hereinafter described.

The cartridges [5 and It are preferably in the form of cylindrical tubes and are generally similar in construction, differing only as to certain details regarding their sealing features, so that a description of one will generally suifice for both. Each cartridge tube is comparatively thinwalled and formed of a suitable heat transmitting metal and is permanently closed at its rear end ll, which, when the cartridge is fitted in its pocket, abuts against the inner end wall !2 of the pocket. Each cartridge is of somewhat less length than its receiving pocket so that its forward or discharge end terminates close to but in rear of the mouth or recessed end l3 of the pocket. The front or discharge end of each cartridge tube is normally closed by diameter reducing and sealing means to prevent escape of the charge material, said sealing means having a di charge passage or orifice closed by a fusible element or material which, when melted by the heat of the overheated bearing, will allow the charge to escape through the discharge passage or orifice to give the desired alarm or signal indication. The cartridges when fitted in the pockets are disposed inside the bearing sufficiently close to the rubbing surface of the bearing so that the heat of the overheated hearing will be transmitted as quickly as possible to the fusible elements of the cartridge.

The sealing means at the discharge end of each cartridge, cartridge I5, for example, comprises a diameter reducing and seat ring i8 fitted therein and having an inwardly tapering threaded bore [9, an outer end flange 2B and an inner end recess 2i, and shoulder 22. The flange of the ring is abuts against the outer end of the cartridge tube and the ring is fastened in place by means of a solder ring 23 disposed in the recess 2| and bearing against the shoulder 22 and inner surface of the cartridge tube and fused to the ring and tube to firmly secure the ring in place.

The cartridge is charged with its signal produc- A ing material through the bore IQ of the ring l8, Fig. 3 showing such a charge S in tube it, after which the bore 19 is closed by a special construction of sealing cap or plug 24 to hold the charge confined from escape until released by the overheating of the bearing.

The cap or plug 28 has an inwardly tapering body or shank portion 25 which is threaded to tightly fit the threaded bore iii of the seat ring and is provided at its outer end with an angular gripping head 26. The plug is formed with an outwardly tapering bore or passage 2? at the inner end of which fits an orifice plug 28 having a small orifice 29 which, when unsealed, will allow the charge within the tube, when volatilized, to escape at a measured rate. This orifice is norm-ally sealed by a fusible element or body of fusible material 36 fitted in the bore 21 between its outer end and the plug 28. The plug 28 is held from outward displacement under pressure of the charge by the fusible material 38 and is held from inward displacement by suitable means, as by spinning over the inner end of the shank 25 to form a head or flange 3|. It will be under stood that normally, or before assemblage of the parts 28 and 813 within the plug, the reduced or attenuated rear end portion of the plug from which the bead or flange 3! is formed extends linearly at that end of the plug and initially forms a part of the wall of the bore 21.

In assembling the parts the conical body 30' of fusible material is forced from the rear of the plug into the bore 21, the meter orifice member 28 is then inserted into the bore behind the fusible body 38', and the.

projecting rear end part of the plug is then, by means of a suitable beading, peening or spinning tool or machine, turned or spun inward to form the bead or flange 31 which confines the parts 28 and 3B in place. The plug is then ready'tobe fitted in the seat ring [8 at the normally open end of the cartridge tube, to seal said end of the tube after the tube is charged through the opening in the ring 18 with the signal material. By this construction the fusible element is arranged to lie outside the metering orifice 29 and to seal the orifice against leakage of the charge material as long as the fusible element remains intact, and, owing to the tapered form of the bore 2'! and the fusible element 38, the pressure of the charge material on the orifice plug will cause the fusible element to fit more tightly in the bore 2 1, thus providing an additional safeguard against leakage of the charge from the cartridge tube.

As stated, the cartridges I5 and I6 are filled with charges of different liquids or materials, one of which when released produces a vapor having a disagreeable odor, and the other of which, when released, produces a smoke-like cloud of vapor. These charges are confined in the cartridges until the fusible elements are fused at the predetermined temperature to release the charges. At this temperature the charges vaporize as fast as they can discharge through the meter orifices, producing vapors of the character described, both giving warning of an overheated bearing and directing prompt attention to the location thereof. The discharge continues until both cartridges are empty, which requires from five to ten minutes.

A retainer 32 is provided to secure each cartridge in its pocket. This retainer is of spring washer type and designed to be sprung into the pocket mouth or recess E3 to frictionally bind against the shoulder and annular wall of the recess whereby it is adapted to be held securel in position against displacement. This retainer has an opening lying in line with the bore of the plug 24 and of such size as to allow the fusible material, when fused, to be blown through it by the force of the Volatilized charge and the vapor of the charge to discharge freely therethrough to the atmosphere.

As a result of this construction of the tube and its sealing means and the use of the retainer 32 a cartridge tube is provided which meets all requirements and overcomes all objection to prior alarm devices of the cartridge type heretofore suggested which have been either fatally defective in construction or have otherwise failed to meet practical requirements. One essential requirement is that the sensitive element of the device must be located in the hearing, or journal itself, to provide an effective indication of the bearing temperature. My cartridge tube fully meets this requirement. Another essential requirement is that the device must be readily applicable in its charged condition to the bearing and readily removable therefrom when spent so that a new cartridge may be quickly substituted for it. My construction of pocket cartridge meets this requirement, as a changed cartridg may be quickly inserted into the pocket through its open end and held in place by applying the retainer, and the cartridge when spent may be removed through the open end of the pocket on displacing the retainer, which Operations may be performed without the use of any special tool. This is of great convenience and advantage from the standpoint of saving valuable time in removing a spent tube and applying a new one on the road when a train is stopped on account of the occurrence of a hot box. Still another essential requirement is that a hot box cartridge must be so designed that it can be filled and emptied through an opening of adequate size and one other than the aperture used for a properly regulated ejection of the charge vapor when the alarm functions, and that the seal used must be proof against leakage of the charge. Any opening large enough to permit ready filling of the cartridge will necessarily be so large that it cannot serve as a metering orifice. The metering orifice must be of such size and shape that it will prolong the discharge for a sufficient length of time to attract the attention of the crew of a running train. By experience it has been found to be at least five minutes. With my construction the tube may be filled through its outlet end after the diameter reducing seat ring i8 is applied, whereby an opening of sufiicient size for this purpose will be furnished, which opening, however, will be too large to serve as a meter orifice. This objection is overcome by the use of the orifice member, which, as before stated, is arranged in rear of the fusible material, so that the meter orifice will be kept clear from and cannot become clogged by the fusible material when said material is fused and blown out. A fatal disadvantage of any cartridge that must be filled through the discharge port or orifice is that the closing seal must of necessity be fused in the orifice after the cartridge is filled. The application of heat is required to do this, and the inevitable effect, no matter how quickly or expertly the work is done, is to start premature vaporization of the charge, thus making it necessary to apply the seal against the vapor pressure, which has been repeatedly tried without success. My construction obviously avoids this objection. Any bearing during normal operation generates a certain amount of heat which causes the charge to expand and exert outward pressure. This pressure, in combination with the vibrations to which the bearing is subjected, tends to loosen any fusible seal and permit premature escape of the charge, thus causing a false alarm. In my cartridge the fusible material and the opening in which it fits are tapered in such manner that the greater the pressure generated in the cartridge the tighter the seal becomes so that it is maintained until the fusible material is melted. This sealing feature not only permits of the application of the parts 24, 28, as a unit after the part i8 has been secured in place and the tube has been charged through the opening therein, but prevents leakage of the charge under the ordinary working heat of the bearing when the bearing is in use, as although the charge may be expanded and the fusible material may be softened to some degree by the working heat, the pressure of the charge will only cause the fusible material to be wedged to a greater degree in its tapered seat, so that no leakage of the charge can occur. Finally, as in my alarm device the sealed end of the tube faces the open end of the bearing pocket and the apertured retainer 32 at that end of the pocket, the fusible material, when fused, is arranged to be blown from the plug through the opening in the retainer by the vapor so that no clogging of the meter orifice can occur and the vapor will be reliably discharged to produce an effective signal.

The cartridge I6 and its sealing features are similar in construction to the corresponding parts of the cartridge 5 with a certain exception, and the sealing features thereof are designated by similar primed reference numerals. The exception referred to is that the head 26' of the sealing plug 24' of the cartridge I6 is of a different form from that of the head 26 of the sealing,

plug 24 of cartridge 15, the head 28 in the example shown being hexagonal while the head 26' is square. These differences in the heads 26 and 2E identify the character of the cartridges as being respectively odor and smoke cartridges, but other identifying means or marks, preferably applied to such heads, may be used to enable the cartridges to be distinguished from each other.

The advantage of the use of a cartridge type alarm is that a supply of cartridges of each type may be readily carried for use and supplied to a bearing to take the place of a spent or discharged cartridge wherever the bearing may be, a matter of great convenience in installing the cartridges in journal box or other bearings, particularly of rolling stock. Other advantages of my novel construction of alarm cartridge will be obvious from the foregoing description.

In order to provide for the escape of the warning material or vapor, an aperture 33 may be provided in the top wall of the box I, preferably adjacent the hinge lug 2 and beneath the cam portion 34 formed as part of the hinge lug for engagement by the resilient means 35 of the lid for holding the lid in open or closed position.

Thecam portion 3% is desirably extended over the aperture 33 and a flange 35 desirably extends around the aperture so, that said aperture is satisfactorily hooded to restrict the entry of dirt or other foreign substances into the box, while not interfering with the escape of hot-box indicating materials. Another venting aperture 35 may be provided through the lid of the box either as supplemental to the opening 33 or as an alternative thereto. The aperture 36 is desirably hooded by means of a hollow embossment 27 on the front face of the box to minimize the entrance of foreign material into the box. Other equivalent means of venting the vapors through the box may obviously be employed.

While I have shown and described my invention as applied to a car journal box for indieating a hot-box when it occurs, it is to be understood that it is not limited thereto, as it may be used in machinery bearing or other bearing structures to indicate when the bearing is overheated so that attention may be given to prevent injury to or destruction of the bearing parts.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that I have provided a hot-box indicator adapted to be used on bearings generally and in connection with car, locomotive or other rolling stock bearings, and applicable directly to the bearing or brass and adapted, upon the development of a predetermined abnormal temperature to omit a visible warning, an odorous warning, or both, whereby a hot-box may be detected and remedied prior to destruction of the bearing and associated journal with the consequent danger of derailment and loss of life.

Although certain means have been shown for carrying my invention into practical effect, it will be understood that modifications may be made within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

threaded opening through which the tube may be charged with the material, a closure plug having an outwardly tapering shank portion engaging said opening in the ring and an outer enlarged angular head portion disposed outwardly beyond the ring, said plug being formed with a bore for the discharge of the vaporized material, said bore having an enlarged end facing toward the charge in the charge containing space or" the tube and a smaller end facing away from said charge, the bore being longitudinally tapered continuously and uniformly between said ends, a meter member fitted in the inner end of the bore and formed with a meter orifice extending coaxially with the bore in the plug, a conical body of fusible material conformably fitted in and normally closing the bore outwardly beyond the meter member, and means at the inner end of the plug for holding the meter'membcr and body of fusible material against inward displacement.

2. An alarm device forum in connection with a journal bearing to indicate when the bearing is overheated comprising a cartridge tube for containing a charge of a vaporizable signal material, said tube having a discharge end, and a closure means at the discharge end of the tube provided with a vapor discharge passage having an enlarged inlet end facing toward the charge in the tube and a smaller outlet end facing away from said charge, said passage being tapered outwardly between its inlet and outlet ends, an orifice member fitted in the inner end of the passage and provided with a meter orifice to regulate the discharge of the vapor, and a body of fusible material of a tapered form conforming to and closing said passage outwardly beyond the orifice member against the escape of the signal material.

3. An alarm devicefor use in connection with a journal bearing to indicate when the bearing is overheated comprising a thin-walled metallic cartridge tube for containing a charge of a vaporizable signal material, said tube having a discharge end, but being otherwise permanently closed, a sealing ring fitted in the discharge end of the tube and having an inwardly tapering threaded opening through which the tube may be charged with the material, an outwardly tapered threaded closure plug engaging said opening in the ring and formed with a bore for the discharge of the vaporized material, said bore having an enlarged inner end facing toward the charge in the tube and a smaller outer end facing away from said charge, the bore being longitudinally tapered outwardly between said ends, an orifice member fitted in the inner end of the bore and formed. with a meter orifice to regulate the ""scharge of the vapor, and a conical body of fusible material fitted in and normally closing the bore outwardly beyond the orifice member.

4. An alarm device for use in connection with a journal bearing to indicate when the bearing is overheated comprising a cartridge tube for containing a charge of a vaporizable signal producing material, said tube being of substantially uniform diameter and having a discharge end,

and a diameter reducing and sealing means fitted the discharge end of the tube and including a diameter reducing member secured to the tube and having a threaded opening of smaller diameter than the internal diameter of the tube through which the tube is charged with the signal material, a plug of substantial thickness threaded in said opening and formed with a longitudinal bore having an enlarged inner end facing toward the charge in the tube and a smaller outer end communicating with the atmosphere and facing away from the charge, said bore being continuously and uniformly tapered between its inner and outer ends, and a body of fusible material disposed in and sealing said tapered bore against the escape of the charge.

5. An alarm device for use in connection with a journal bearing to indicate when the bearing is overheated comprising a unitary cartridge tube for containing a charge of a vaporizable signal material, said tube having a discharge end, and a diameter reducing and sealing closure for the discharge end of the tube including a diameter reducing member fixed to the tube and having an opening for charging the tube with the material, a plug for said opening having a passage for the discharge of the signal vapor, said passage being provided with an enlarged end facing toward the charge in the tube and a smaller end facing outwardly and away from the charge, said passage being continuously and uniformly tapered outwardly between said ends, a meter member fitted in the inner end of said passage and havinga meter orifice of a diameter smaller than that of either end of the passage to regulate the discharge of the signal vapor, and a body of fusible material fitted in and closing the tapered passage outwardly beyond the meter member.

6. An alarm device for use in connection with a journal bearing to indicate when the bearing is overheated comprising a unitary cartridge tube for containing a charge of a vaporizable signal material, said tube having a, discharge end but being otherwise permanently closed, and a diameter reducing and sealing closure for the discharge end of the tube including a diameter reducing member fixed to the tube and having an opening for charging the tube with the material, a closure plug formed with a shank portion fitted in said opening and having a wrench receiving head at its outer end and being provided with a longitudinal bore having an enlarged end facing toward the charge and a smaller end facing outwardly and away from the charge, said bore tapering continuously and uniformly between said ends, a meter member fitted in the inner end of the bore and having a meter orifice of less diameter than that of either end of the bore, and a body of fusible material fitted in the bore outwardly beyond the meter member and normally closing the bore.

'7. An alarm device for use in connection with a journal bearing to indicate when the bearing is overheated comprising a thin-walled metallic cartrid e tube for containing a charge of a vaporizable signal material, sa d tube being of comparat vely large internal diameter and having adischarge end, a diameter reducing sleeve at the discharge end of the tube, a plug fitted in said sleeve and provided with a longitudinal bore having an enlarged end fac ng inwardly and toward the charge and a smaller end facing outwardly and away from the charge, said bore being tapered outwardly between said ends, a washerlike member formed independent of the tube and same and the body of fusible material against inward displacement.

8. An alarm device for use in connection with a journal bearing to indicate when the bearing is overheated comprising a cartridge tube for containing a charge of a vaporizable signal material, said tube having a discharge end, a sealing ring fitted in the discharge end of the tube and having threaded opening through which the tube may be charged with the material, a closure plug having an inner threaded shank portion engaging said opening in the ring and a wrench receiving head portion disposed outwardly beyond the ring, said plug being formed with a bore for the discharge of the vaporized material, said bore having an enlarged end facing toward the charge containing space of the tube and a smaller end facing away from said space, the bore being longitudinally tapered between said ends, a meter member fitted in the inner end of the bore and formed with a meter orifice extending coaxially with the bore in the plug, and a conical body of fusible material fitted in and normally closing the bore outwardly beyond the orifice member.

9. An alarm device for use in connection with a journal bearing to indicate when the bearing is overheated comprising a cartridge tube for containing a charge of a vaporizable signal material, said tube having a discharge end, a sealing ring fitted in the discharge end of the tube and having a threaded opening of smaller diameter than the internal diameter of the tube through which the tube may be charged with the material, a closure plug having an inner threaded shank portion engaging said opening in the ring and a wrench receiving head portion disposed outwardly beyond the ring, said plug being formed with a bore for the discharge of the vaporized material, said bore having an enlarged end facing toward the charge containing space of the tube and a smaller end facing away from said space, the bore being longitudinally tapered between said ends, and a conical body of fusible material conformably fitted and normally closing the tapered bore.

10. An alarm device for use in connection with a journal bearing to indicate when the bearing is overheated comprising a cartridge tube for containing a charge of a vaporizable signal material, said tube having a discharge end provided with a vapor discharge passage having an inlet end facing toward the charge in the tube and an outlet end facing away from said charge, an orifice member disposed in said passage and having a meter orifice to regulate the discharge of the vapor, and a body of fusible material closing said passage outwardly beyond the meter member against the escape of the signal material.

11. An alarm device for use in connection with a journal bearing to indicate when the bearing is overheated comprising a cartridge tube for containing a charge of a vaporizable signal producing material, said tube having a discharge end provided with an inwardly tapering threaded opening of less diameter than the internal diameter of the tube through which the tube is charged with the signal material, an externally tapered threaded plug for closing said opening and formed with a longitudinal bore having an inner end facing toward the charge in the tube and an outer end communicating with the atmosphere and facing away from the charge, said bore being tapered between its inner and outer ends, an orifice member fitted in said bore and having a meter orifice to regulate the discharge of the vaporized material, and a body of fusible material disposed in and sealing said tapered bore outwardly beyond the orifice member against the escape of the charge.

12. An alarm device for use in connection with a journal bearing to indicate when the bearing is overheated comprising a cartridge tube for containing a charge of a vaporizable signal material, said tube having a discharge end constructed to provide an opening of less diameter than the internal diameter of the tube and through which the tube is charged with the material, a plug for closing said opening, said plug being provided with a vapor discharge passage having an enlarged inlet end facing toward the charge in the tube and a smaller outlet end facing away from said charge, said passage being tapered toward its outlet end, and a tapered body of fusible material disposed in and closing said passage against the escape of the signal material.

13. An alarm device for use in connection with a journal bearing to indicate when the bearing is overheated comprising a cartridge tube for containing a charge of a vaporizable signal producing material, said tube having a discharge end provided with a threaded opening of less diameter than the internal diameter of the tube and through which the tube is charged with the signal material, a plug threaded in said opening and formed with a longitudinal bore having an inner end facing toward the charge in the tube and an outer end communicating with the at mosphere and. facing away from the charge, said bore being tapered between its inner and outer ends, an orifice member fitted in the bore and having a meter orifice to regulate the discharge of the vaporized material, and a body of fusible material disposed in and sealing said tapered bore outwardly beyond the orifice member against the escape of the charge.

HERBERT W. FAUS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 401,531 Agerskov Apr. 16, 1889 1,151,764 Dodson Aug. 31, 1915 1,573,488 Hackman Feb. 16, 1926 1,979,875 Faus Nov. 6, 1934 2,026,807 Timken Jan. 7, 1936 2,230,047 Eastburg Jan. 28, 1941 2,277,533 Thompson Mar. 24, 1942 2,280,755 Hexamer Apr. 21, 1942 2,431,110 Clair Nov. 18, 1947 OTHER REFERENCES Railway Mech. Eng. April 1946, Smoke-and- Odor Hot-Box Alarm (pages186, 187, 188, 193).

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US401531 *Oct 1, 1888Apr 16, 1889 Christian agerskoy
US1151764 *Sep 28, 1914Aug 31, 1915Job T DodsonFusible safety-plug.
US1573488 *Jul 13, 1925Feb 16, 1926Hoffman Mfg Co BSafety appliance for steam boilers
US1979875 *Feb 17, 1931Nov 6, 1934Faus Herbert WHot-box indicator
US2026807 *Jan 8, 1934Jan 7, 1936Timken Roller Bearing CoRoller bearing axle
US2230047 *Mar 4, 1938Jan 28, 1941Timken Roller Bearing CoTelltale
US2277533 *Apr 26, 1939Mar 24, 1942Thompson Lester OFusible blowout plug
US2280755 *Oct 28, 1939Apr 21, 1942Timken Roller Bearing CoThermic telltale
US2431110 *Sep 5, 1944Nov 18, 1947Frank CrowFusible plug for boilers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2711709 *Jul 31, 1953Jun 28, 1955Patrick H SullivanHot box detector
US3197632 *Jul 20, 1959Jul 27, 1965Westinghouse Air Brake CoHot bearing detector
US3520274 *Nov 24, 1967Jul 14, 1970Farr CoHotbox alarm
US4604604 *Jun 29, 1984Aug 5, 1986International Harvester CompanyErodible-motor vehicue brakes
Classifications
U.S. Classification116/214, 246/169.00A, 116/106, 116/217, 116/DIG.380
International ClassificationB61F15/06, B61K9/04
Cooperative ClassificationB61K9/04, B61F15/06, Y10S116/38
European ClassificationB61F15/06, B61K9/04