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Publication numberUS2552693 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 15, 1951
Filing dateJun 18, 1949
Priority dateJun 18, 1949
Publication numberUS 2552693 A, US 2552693A, US-A-2552693, US2552693 A, US2552693A
InventorsSmith Milton B
Original AssigneeHettrick Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hassock upholstery construction
US 2552693 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 15, 1951 M. B. SMITH 2,552,693

HASSOCK UPHOLSI'ERY CONSTRUGTION Filed June 18, 1949 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN V EN TOR.

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Patented May 15, 1951 HASSOCK UPI-IOLSTERY CONSTRUCTION Milton B. Smith, Huntington, Ind, assignor to The Hettrick Manufacturing Company, lloledo, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Application June 18, 1949, Serial No. 99,909

4 Claims.

This invention relates to hassocks, and an object is to produce a new and improved hassock which has a rigid body portion to sustain a substantial weight, has a new and improved seat cushion structure which is simple to manufacture on a quantity basis, and which has the novel features of construction and arrangement hereinafter described.

For purposes of illustration but not of limitation, an embodiment of the invention is shown in the accompanying drawings, in which Figure l is a top perspective View of the hassock;

Figure 2 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional elevation of the hassock; and

Figure 3 is a composite view illustrating the component parts of the hassock.

The illustrated embodiment of the invention comprises an annulus or cylinder ll! of fiberlike material providing a sturdy but self-sustaining support for the hassock and one which is relatively inexpensive. It is desirable that the hassock be of wood fiber, for example, so that a sewed seam can be formed through its walls.

Hence, the walls must be sufiiciently thin for this purpose and still afford sufficient rigidity and strength. In this instance, opposite ends of the annulus or cylinder in are closed by metallic discs H, the bodies of which extend inside the mouths of the annulus It and each disc is flanged over the adjacent outer walls of the an nulus as indicated at i2, and suitably crimped or pressed in place in order to stay in position.

To form the cushion top for the hassock, two pieces of kapok are employed, a disc is approximately the size of the end of the hassocl; and a strip I4 which is sewed to the disc [3 by a sewed seam IE to form a cup, the end of the strip being similarly sewed together if desired by a sewed seam It. The thickness of the disc 13 and the strip or side walls M will vary in accordance with the demands of service. In order to enhance the cushioning effect and resilience of the seat, a quantity of kapok or like material in granular or comminuted or flaky form is deposited on the top of the upper closure metal disc 14. Thereupon, the inverted kapol; covering is slipped over the body substantially as indicated in Figure 2, with the side walls I4 of the cup overlapping the metal flange l2 and a portion of the side walls of the body or annulus Ill. Thereupon, a covering of flexible plastic material such as Vinylite having a circular body portion l8 and depending side walls 19 which Z are attached to the body by a sewed seam 20 is then forced over the inverted kapok cup.

The flexible plastic covering must fit tightly to present a neat appearance, and, therefore, the material is slightly heated such as by infrared rays to render it somewhat stretchable, thus to enable the operator to pull the side walls down into close intimate contact with the side Walls M of the inverted kapok cup. The lower ends of the side walls i9 extend slightly beyond the kapok walls it; and while they are stretched in place, the walls are held in place by a series of wire staples 2| and thereafter, a seam 22 is sewed through the walls of the fiber body It securely to hold the cover in position. The seam 22 also extends through a looped finishing strip 23 thereby also to secure it in position and after the seam has been sewed, the free edge of the looped finishing strip 23 is then folded over to conceal the seam.

The remaining exposed portion of the body portion Hi may be covered in any suitable fashion. As shown, a strip 24 of fabric material is wound around the body and adhesively connected in place. At the lower portion of the hassock and concealing the flange of the bottom metallic disc l I is another folded fabric finishing strip 25 which is sewed through the fiber body Iii by a seam 26.

From the above description, it is manifest that I have produced an exceedingly simple and inexpensive hassock which ailiords the desired cushioning effect and serves as a comfortable seat but which is exceedingly sturdy and strong. The hassock is so designed that it can be manufactured on a quantity production basis expeditiously and economically. The quantity of material such as the cushioning material and trim is reduced to a minimum, thereby reducing the cost of materials to a minimum.

It should be understood that other side wall decorations may be employed in substitution for an adhered strip. In fact, the structure lends itself to many different forms of decorations and ornamental effects. It is further to be understood that numerous changes in details of construction, arrangement and choice of materials may be efiected without departing from the spirit of the invention especially as defined in the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. A hassock comprising a supporting annulus of fiber-like material, a metallic disc closing one end of said annulus and having a rim portion overlapping the adjacent end portion of the anmaterial covering said metallic disc with the side walls thereof overlapping a portion of the side walls of the annulus, comminuted kapok-like material interposed between the recessed portion of the cover and the adjacent bottom of the inverted cup, an inverted cup-shaped fabric cover enclosing said kapok-like cup, and means for securing the free ends of said fabric cup to the walls of the annulus.

3. A hassock comprising a supporting annulus of fiber-like material, a metallic disc closing 'one'end of said annulus and having a rim portion overlapping the adjacent end portion of the annulus, said cover being recessed to extend inside of the annulus, an inverted cup of kapoklike material covering said metallic disc with the side walls thereof overlapping a portion of the side Walls of the annulus, comminuted kapoklike material interposed between the, recessed portion of the cover and the adjacent bottom of the inverted cup, an inverted cup-shaped covering of flexible plastic material, and means for securing the free ends of said fabric cup to the walls of the annulus.

4. A hassock comprising a hollow support, a metallic plate enclosing one end of said support and having a rim portion overlapping the adjacent end portion of said support, a layer of padding material covering said metallic plate and overlapping a portion of the side walls of the support, a fabric cover enclosing said padding material and having free ends overlapping the padding material at the side walls of the support, and means for securing the free ends of the fabric to the walls of the hollow support.

MILTON B. SMITH.

REFERENCES CIT D The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,485,918 Powell Oct. 25, 1949 2,487,634 Buttner Nov. 8, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2485918 *Oct 31, 1947Oct 25, 1949Frank A PowellAir vent hassock
US2487634 *Dec 6, 1945Nov 8, 1949Rudolf ButtnerHassock
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2693227 *May 22, 1953Nov 2, 1954Holland Lawrence EBoudoir chair
US2833337 *Jan 26, 1956May 6, 1958Hettrick Mfg CompanyUpholstered hassock
US3099482 *Jan 30, 1962Jul 30, 1963R S Woodruff & CoCombined ice chest, seat, life preserver, and reversible back
US3252737 *Jan 21, 1964May 24, 1966B T Crump Co IncHassock manufacture
US3536359 *Jan 16, 1969Oct 27, 1970Amos Paul EugeneFurniture assembly
US4013316 *Jan 21, 1975Mar 22, 1977Winifred CropperMechanical stool for handicapped persons
US6364416Mar 17, 2000Apr 2, 2002Steelcase Development CorporationMulti-function article of furniture
US20110221255 *Jun 4, 2010Sep 15, 2011Vs Vereinigte Spezialmobelfabriken Gmbh & Co. KgItem of seating furniture
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/462, 297/461
International ClassificationA47C3/16, A47C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47C3/16
European ClassificationA47C3/16