Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2552694 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 15, 1951
Filing dateOct 29, 1945
Priority dateOct 29, 1945
Publication numberUS 2552694 A, US 2552694A, US-A-2552694, US2552694 A, US2552694A
InventorsMerrick Stoner Arthur
Original AssigneeJacobs Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toolholder
US 2552694 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 15, 1951 A. M. STONER 2,552,694

woowowsa Filed Oct. 29, 1945 llll III/IIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIII" INVENTOR. A? new Maw/0r STONE/P A 7' TORNE K Patented May 15, 1951 TOOLHOLDER Arthur Merrick Stoner, West Hartford, Conn., as-

signor to The Jacobs Manufacturing Company, Hartford, Conn, a corporation of Connecticut Application October 29, 1945,. Serial No. 625,249

3 Claims.

This invention relates to an improved key holder for connecting a key or wrench to a tool with which it is to be used. It is especially designed to hold the key or wrench for an electrically driven chuck and to form a flexible connection between its electrical conductor and the chuck to maintain the key in a convenient position for use and to prevent the displacement or loss of the key.

Referring to the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a key h lder which is made according to and embodies the invention.

Fig. .2 is a sectional front view of the device shown in Fig. l, the section being taken on the line 2--2 of the latter figure.

Fig. 3 is a side elevation, partly in section, of the device shown in the preceding figures with one of its ends afiixed to an electrical conductor and with a chuck key in the other end.

Fig. 4 is a plan View on a larger scale of some of the parts shown in Fig. 3, illustrating the mode of affixing the device to an electrical conductor.

Fig. 5 is a sectional plan of other parts of the device illustrating the mode of afiixing a tool to the device.

Fig. 6 is an end elevation of another form of tool which may be held by the device.

The device is an integral piece of resilient material, such as an oil resistant synthetic rubber. One of its end portions, designated by the reference numeral It, is in the form of a thin walled hollow cylinder having a bore I l slightly smaller than the diameter of the part of the tool which is to be inserted in it. The other end portion, designated by the reference numeral I2, is in the form of a flat head which has considerably greater transverse width than thickness, in which is a substantially rectangular eye or slot l3, the cross-sectional area of which is considerably smaller than-that of the tubular end portion 10. The end portions 10 and I2 are interconnected by a flat strap-like portion, It, the thickness of which is about one-half the thickness of the head l2 and slightly greater than the smaller dimension of the eye 13. The width of this portion 34 is about double its thickness, and may be uniform throughout its length. For a purpose which will be described, its width is greater than the length of the eye i3. As shown in the drawings, the portion MA adjacent the head is wider than the length of the eye, and the remainder of this intermediate part of the device is somewhat narrower.

The head I2 is stretched to enlarge the eye l3 therein, and the tubular end portion 10 is passed through the eye. The device is furnished to the user in the condition in which it is illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 with the strap l4 and MA in the form of a loop.

In afiixing the device to an electrical conductor 28, the loop formed by the strap is passed over the conductor and the loop shortened by pulling the strap It through the eye. When made as shown in the drawings, the cross-sectional areas of the eye it and of the strap is are so nearly alike that the strap will slip through the eye easily until the widened portion MA of the strap reaches the head 12. as shown in Fig. 4. Then a tensional strain is put upon the strap in the direction of the arrow A to stretch the strap. This reduces the cross-sectional size of the portion [4A in Fig. 4 and enables the loop to be tightened upon the conductor. When the tension is released the portion MA of the strap in the eye tends to resume its original size and becomes locked in the head It so that this end of the device is securely afiixed to the conductor 23. When the strap is of a uniform width greater than the length of the eye, its cross-sectional size may be similarly reduced by stretching.

designates a chuck key which has a shank 3|. This is affixed to the device in the following manner: The end of the shank 3 I, which is somewhat larger than the bore II, is inserted in the end of the bore, as shown in Fig. 5. Then by squeezing the tubular portion together, as shown at 19A, air is expelled from the bore, after which the shank 3| may be pushed the rest of the way into the bore, as shown in Fig. 3. The shank 3! is then securely affixed to the device. An outward pull on the shank 3| tends to decrease the diameter of the tubular portion l 0 and thereby increases the pressure of the bore II on the shank and its frictional grip on the shank. Immersing the shank in gasolene or the like facilitates this operation. It makes the shank slippery and has the further effect of partially dissolving the surface of the bore II, which, upon drying, forms a cohesive bond with the shank.

Obviously the device is capable of holding other types of tools. Fig. 6 shows, as an example, a chuck wrench 30A of another type, which has a shank 3| and a hexagonal arm 32 extending at right angles from its outer end. In this figure the end portion HJA is shown narrower than the corresponding part It in Figs. 1 and 3, and closed except where the shank 3| is inserted.

Various modifications in construction, mode of operation, method and use of an invention may and do occur to others, especially after benefiting from knowledge of such a disclosure as that herein presented of the principles involved, but the invention itself is not confined to the present showing.

I claim:

1. A tool holder consisting of a single integral elongated piece of resilient material having a head formed at one of its ends, a tool-receiving portion formed at its other end and an intermediate connecting portion, an eye formed in the head, through which eye the tool-receiving por tion may be passed to form a loop around an electrical conductor, the cross-sectional area of the part of said connecting portion of the holder adjacent the head being greater than that of the eye and being engaged by pressure exerted upon it by the resilience of the head 'when it is forced through the eye.

2. A tool holder consisting of a single integral elongated piece of resilient material having a transversely widened head formed at one of its ends, a tool-receiving portion having a cylindrical bore formed at its other end, a rectangular eye of greater Width than thickness formed in the head, through which eye the tool-receiving portion may be passed to form a self-locking loop around an electrical conductor, and an intermediate connecting portion, the cross-sectional area of the part of said intermediate connecting portion of the holder adjacent the head corresponding in shape to, but having larger dimensions than those of the eye and being engaged by pressure exerted upon it by the resilience of 4 the head after said adjacent portion has been forced through the eye.

3. A tool holder consisting of a single integral elongated piece of resilient material having a transversely widened head formed at one of its ends, a hollow cylindrical tool-receiving socket having a continuous Wall formed at its other end, a rectangular eye of greater width than thickness formed in the head of subs'tantially'the same cross-sectional area as that of the socket, through which eye the socket may be passed to form 'a self-locking loop around an electrical conductor, and an intermediate interconnecting portion, the cross-sectional area of the part of said intermediate connecting portion of the holder adjacent the head corresponding to, but of larger dimensions than those of the eye and engaged by pressure exerted upon it by the resilience of the head when said adjacent portion has been forced through the eye.

ARTHUR MERRICK STONER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 783,520 Harpham Feb. 28, 1905 831,391 Ubellar Sept. 18,1906

1,044,519 Hassard Nov. 19, 1912 1,924,596 Davis 1 Aug. 29, 1933 2,297,661 Okun Sept. 29, 1942

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US783520 *Nov 18, 1904Feb 28, 1905Julius C HarphamNeck-yoke center.
US831391 *Oct 28, 1905Sep 18, 1906James L UbellarAttachment for tooth-brushes, &c.
US1044519 *Feb 2, 1911Nov 19, 1912Harland D HassardUmbrella-hanger.
US1924596 *Jul 27, 1932Aug 29, 1933Harry C DavisDog leash
US2297661 *May 19, 1939Sep 29, 1942Swank Products IncChain slide
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2777352 *Nov 6, 1952Jan 15, 1957Washington Machine & Tool WorkWork driver
US2880008 *Feb 5, 1957Mar 31, 1959Jacobs Mfg CoChuck key and support
US4652001 *Mar 10, 1986Mar 24, 1987Gordon RathbunChuck key assembly
US4718797 *Dec 7, 1981Jan 12, 1988Purviance John RSnap-on pad for chuck key
US4986554 *Jul 25, 1988Jan 22, 1991Rathbun Gordon GTether for a drill chuck key
US5332240 *May 17, 1993Jul 26, 1994Paul BedoianDrill chuck key tool
US6340163Nov 28, 2000Jan 22, 2002Brady John NewmanSnag-resistant chuck key
Classifications
U.S. Classification279/149, 248/694
International ClassificationB23B45/00
Cooperative ClassificationB23B45/006
European ClassificationB23B45/00F