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Publication numberUS2552837 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 15, 1951
Filing dateApr 6, 1949
Priority dateApr 6, 1949
Publication numberUS 2552837 A, US 2552837A, US-A-2552837, US2552837 A, US2552837A
InventorsBlazer Noel E
Original AssigneeWestinghouse Electric Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wall type heater
US 2552837 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented May 15, 1951 WALL TYPE HEATER Noel E. Blazer, Berkeley, Calif., assignor to Westinghouse Electric Corporation, East Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Application April 6, 1949, Serial No. 85,915

(Cl. 21S- 34) 4 Claims.

My invention relates to a wall type heater, that is, a heater positioned in a recess or an opening in a wall.

The object of the invention is to minimize the deposit of particles of matter on the wall above the heater. Such deposit is commonly known as smudging.

In accordance with my invention, I provide a deflector which is disposed adjacent to but spaced from the top wall of the heater casing and the top of the frame, and which also projects beyond the front face of the heater. This delector provides, together with said top wall and the top of the frame, a passage for free flow of cooler air continuously to and a little beyond the front face of the heater, and the deflector also directs the hot air away from the heater and the wall. The dei-lector projects from the front face of the heater a suiiicient extent to keep the relatively hot and relatively cool air streams separated until they have attained substantially vertical direction of flow.

These and other objects are effected by the invention as will be apparent from the following description and claims taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this application, in which:

Fig. l is a perspective View showing the heater mounted in a wall;

Fig. 2 is a vertical section taken on the line Fig. 3 is a section taken on the line III-III of Fig. 2, looking upwardly; and,

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary front elevational view, showing the passage for the cooler air provided by the deflector.

The heater is of the wall or wall insert type and is shown on the drawing as disposed mainly but not entirely within `a recess I provided in the wall Il. The heater is provided with an outer casing l2 which includes a rear wall i3; side walls I4, an inclined top wall I5 and a bottom wall I6. It further includes an inner casing or deector l1 provided with a rear wall i8, side walls I9, `a bottom wall 2U and an inclined top wall 2|, said walls being disposed in spaced relation to the corresponding walls of the outer casing I2. The heating means is disposed within the inner casing. It comprises a heating element 22 which is supported upon the bottom wall of the inner` casing or deflector I1 and having a passage 24 communicating with a registering opening in the bottom wall 20.

A frame 25 extends around the front of the casing I2. This frame has a front wall 26, an

inner wall or flange 2l extending slightly inwardly of the casing i2, and an inclined outer wall or iiange 2E, the edge of which abuts against the face of the wall il. A grille or grille panel 3i extends across the front face of the heater, and is disposed within and mounted on the frame 25 by means of pins 32 and spacer bushings 33. The grille 3l is thus a unit with, and is removable with, the frame 2c. The frame is secured in place in any suitable manner, such as by screws 31E.

In accordance with my invention, I provide the deflector 3&5 which comprises a short horizontal portion disposed cntop oi the grille 3i and secured between said top and the spacer bushings 33. The defiector further comprises an inner inclined portion St which extends along but spaced from the inclined top wall it of the outer casing, and it further includes an inclined outwardly projecting portion 3l. As will be noted from the drawings, particularly Fig. 2, there is thus provided a passage 35i, which extends rst between the defiector portion Sii and the top wall l5,

then between the horizontal portion of the deiiector and the inner flange 2l of the frame and then between the outer delector portion 3l and the front wa1l2i of the frame.

The sup-ply of electric current to the heating element is controlled by any suitable means, the details of which form no part of this invention.

Operation rlhe ow of air is indicated by the arrows on the drawing and will be clear therefrom. Air

enters through the openings in the lower portion of the grille Si and is discharged therefrom through openings in the upper portion of the grille. .A major portion of the air enters through the lower portion ci the grille into the space between the outer and inner bottom walls it and 2U. Some of this air passes through the openings in the bottom wall 2t and the heating element, and provides the hottest stream of air. The heated air discharged from the top of the heating element is deected by the inner wall 2| and is discharged through openings in the adjacent portion of the grille 3|. Another stream of air enters the openings in the grille above the inner bottom wall 2t, iiows upwardly in contact with the heating element 22 and is heated thereby, and then mixes with the heated air leaving the interior of the heating element. Another portion of the air entering the space between the walls i6 and 2! passes upwardly through the space between the inner and outer rear walls and this air stream remains relatively cool as it does not pass in contact with the heating unit. This air stream serves to cool the inner casing. A portion of this air stream passes through the passage between the inner top Wall 2| and the baille 3S and is mixed to some extent With the hot air leaving the heating unit. Thus, a relatively hot air stream is discharged through the upper openings in the grille 3|.

Another portion of the relatively cool air passing between the rear walls passes through the above-mentioned passage 38 beginning with the space between the baffle 36 and the outer top wall i5. As this relatively cool air stream is discharged from the space between the deilector portion 31 and the front wall 26 of the frame, its direction has been changed to substantially vertical upward direction. The relatively hot air discharged through the openings in the upper portion of the grille 3| is deflected outwardly laway from the wall by the projecting portion 31 of the deflector, and then flows upwardly in parallel with the relatively cool air stream. The relatively cool air stream provides a blanket which separates the hot air stream from the wall and thereby minimizes the deposit of particles on the wall.

An important characteristic of the deflector is that the outwardly projecting portion 31 projects outwardly a sufficient distance to permit the cool air stream to attain a substantially vertical direction before it is able to mix with the hot air stream. In this way, the air streams are caused to flow upwardly in parallel with a minimum of mixing and turbulence. To this end, the deflector portion 31 projects outwardly a distance at least as great or preferably greater than the minimum width of the passage 38, namely, the space between the horizontal portion of the deilector and the adjacent flange 27. In one embodiment of the present invention, the width of the spacing between the horizontal portion of the deflectoi and the adjacent flange 2l, as determined by the spacer bushings 33, is inch.

Another characteristic of the deflector is that it extends inwardly a sufcient distance to divide the air going into the passage 38 before the air flowing below the defiector mixes with the hot air below the inner top wall 2|.

While I have shown my invention in but one form, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that it is not so limited, but is susceptible of various changes and modifications without departing from the spirit thereof.

What I claim is:

1. A heater of the wall insert type comprising a casing having rear, side and top walls and having substantial open area in the front face, a heating element disposed within the casing, a partition or deector disposed between the heating element and the rear and top walls and spaced from the latter to shield the latter from the heat of the heating element and also to provide therewith a passage for relatively cool air, and a deilector extending inwardly of said casing between said top wall and said partition to provide a passage above the def-lector for relali i) tively cool air and including a portion projecting forwardly of the forwardmost portion of the heater above the def-lector a distance at least as great as the minimum width of the last-mentioned passage, said projecting portion thereby serving to deflect the hot air away from the front face of the heater and to maintain the hot and the relatively cool air streams divided until the latter attains substantially Vertical flow.

2. A heater as set forth in claim 1 and further including a grill extending across the front face of the heater, said deilector being attached to and carried by said grill adjacent the top thereof and removable therewith as a unit.

3. A heater of the wall insert type comprising an outer casing having rear, side and bottom walls and an outwardly inclined top wall, an inner casing having a rear, side and bottom walls and an outwardly inclined top wall, the walls of the inner casing being disposed in opposed but spaced relation to the corresponding walls of the outer casing, a heating element disposed within the inner casing, said inner and outer casings having substantial open areas in the front face of the heater, and an air deflector comprising a portion extending parallel to but spaced from the inclined top wall of the outer casing and another portion extending to a point beyond the front face of the heater, the outer edge of said deflector beingspaced horizontally from the forwardmost portion of the heater above the deflector a distance at least equal to the minimum width of the passage above the deflector.

4. A heater of the wall insert type comprising an outer casing having rear, side and bottom walls and an outwardly inclined top wall, an inner casing having a rear, side and bottom walls and an outwardly inclined top wall, the walls of the inner casing being disposed in opposite but spaced relation to the corresponding walls of the outer casing, a heating element disposed within the inner casing, said inner and outer casings having substantial open areas in the front face of the heater, a frame disposed about the open front face of the outer casing, a grille disposed within and attached to said frame and extending across the front face of the heater, a deflector disposed on top of and attached to said grille and extending inwardly and outwardly from the grille, said deflector being spaced from the outer inclined top wall and the frame to provide with them a passage for relatively cool air, and to defleet the heated air flowing below said deilector.

NOEL E. BLAZER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,148,057 Sharpe July 27, 1915 1,456,472 Stein May 22, 1923 1,652,438 Hicks Dec. 13, 1927 1,720,373 Mulvany July 9, 1929 2,476,579 Becker July 19, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1148057 *Feb 25, 1915Jul 27, 1915George E SharpeGas-heater.
US1456472 *Dec 11, 1922May 22, 1923Quad Stove Mfg CoWall heater
US1652438 *Jan 26, 1926Dec 13, 1927Wesley Hicks WilliamConvection heater
US1720373 *Feb 2, 1927Jul 9, 1929Electric Sales Service CompanyWall insert electric heater
US2476579 *Mar 24, 1945Jul 19, 1949Dearborn Stove CompanyHot-air gas heater
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2716976 *Jun 11, 1951Sep 6, 1955Thomas PinatelliHeater applicable to floor and wall
US2843364 *Mar 25, 1953Jul 15, 1958Gustaf KahrRoom heating systems
US3023297 *Aug 22, 1960Feb 27, 1962Lau Blower CoWall type electric heater assembly
US3131865 *Mar 20, 1961May 5, 1964Burns & Roe IncHeat storage for building heating
US3175550 *Feb 25, 1963Mar 30, 1965Knapp Monarch CoDual air heater
US3336914 *Mar 18, 1965Aug 22, 1967Charles L RuhlGas space heater
US3394412 *Nov 8, 1965Jul 30, 1968Viking Sauna CoHeat bath apparatus
US3452369 *Jun 14, 1967Jul 1, 1969Viking Sauna CoCompact sauna unit
US4089916 *Sep 8, 1975May 16, 1978Hay Harold RProcess and apparatus for modulating temperatures within enclosures
US4628992 *Jan 23, 1984Dec 16, 1986At&T Information SystemsInduced flow heat exchanger
US5047786 *Jan 31, 1990Sep 10, 1991Airelec IndustriesElectric heating apparatus utilizing dual chambers for heating by convection
US6490410 *Apr 4, 2001Dec 3, 2002Hydro-QuebecWall mounted electric convection heater
US6551185 *Mar 25, 1999Apr 22, 2003Daikin Industries, Ltd.Air intake and blowing device
US7234932 *Mar 9, 2005Jun 26, 2007Hni Technologies Inc.Outdoor gas fireplace
US20040069296 *Aug 28, 2003Apr 15, 2004Fpi Fireplace Products International, Ltd.Heat transfer controller
US20050155600 *Mar 9, 2005Jul 21, 2005Hon TechnologyOutdoor gas fireplace
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/67, 454/236, 392/370, 126/90.00R, 454/234, 454/307, 165/55
International ClassificationF24H3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF24H3/002
European ClassificationF24H3/00B