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Publication numberUS2552845 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 15, 1951
Filing dateNov 1, 1948
Priority dateNov 1, 1948
Publication numberUS 2552845 A, US 2552845A, US-A-2552845, US2552845 A, US2552845A
InventorsCrosby John G
Original AssigneeCrosby John G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Internal gas burner
US 2552845 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

.1. G. cRosBY INTERNAL'GAS BURNER Filed Nov. 1, 1948 May 15, 1951 n Y. Maw r E N N E R vc 0 w Mn G A N H o J w metals and is thus undesirable.

Patented May 15 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE INTERNAL GAS BURNER John 'G. Crosby, Minneapolis, Minn.

Application November 1, 1948, Serial No. 57,759

2 Claims. 1

This invention relates to gas burners and particularly to :a rapid combustion gas burner provided with a combustion chamber completely surrounded by a combustion catalyst.

It has been found that a neutral atmosphere is the most efiicient heating atmosphere, and it has .been a problem to construct a gas burner which will provide complete combustion within the burner and thus produce a neutral atmosphere immediately above the burner. .A reducing atmosphere is inefficient because there are unburned gases which are discharged into the air and thus a maximum heat output cannot be obtained. .An oxidizing atmosphere produces uncombined :oxygen which forms oxides or scale on the heated Maximum heat and eiiiciency are obtained from a burner when the fuel is completely burned without producing any substantial volume of uncombined oxygen. In other words, a neutral atmosphere adjacent the top of the burner is the most-desirable atmosphere because it produces the most eflicient heat and does not produce unnecessary oxidation of the metal being heated.

Substantially complete combustion within the combustion chamber is necessary to produce maximum heat adjacent the top of the burner and to prevent combustion from taking place around the workbeing heated where the work is placed immediately above the burner.

It is an object of my invention to provide a novel and improved gas burner adapted to completely burn the combustible gases with-in the relatively small combustion chamber thereof by producing extremely high speed combustion within the combustion chamber.

It is another object to provide a gas burner having a combustion chamber completely lined with surface catalytic material capable of incandescence when heated to produce complete and rapid combustion within said burner.

It is a further object to provide a burner having a grid adjacent the discharge end thereof made from material capable of incandescence when heated to provide a surface catalyst to produce substantially complete and very rapid combustion within the combustion chamber of the burner.

These and other objects and advantages of my invention will more fully appear from the following description made in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein like reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views and in which:

Fig. 1 is a vertical sectional view of my imcess B in said outercasing 5. The block I is hollow forming a generally cylindrical gas supply passage 8 in the lower portion 9 which forms an annular abutment shoulder I [I at the top of passage 8. The upper hollow portion of block 1 is flared outwardly toward the top, forming an inverted frusto-conical combustion chamber I l.

The upper portion of the casing 5 is bored out to form a 'frusto-conical aperture [2 diminishing toward the top thereof and adapted to receive a slightly tapered catalytic grid l3 therein. A refractory inlet grid I4 is inserted into the supply passage 8 and abuts the annular shoulder I0 therein. A metal sleeve I5 is fixed to a base plate It and is inserted into the supply passage 8. The base plate 16 has an inlet port I! and a pilot inlet aperture l8 formed therein and is adapted to abut the bottom of the burner when said sleeve I5 is inserted into the said passage 8 and combines therewith to hold the elements of the burner together in assembled position. A heat resistant gasket 23 is interposed between the top of said sleeve 15 and the inlet grid I4 to form a seal and provide an expansion pad therebetween. A reinforcing ring l9 surrounds the lower portion of casing 5 in fixed relation thereto and has an annular horizontal flange 20 around the bottom thereof. The base I6 has an annular recess around the .outer periphery thereof to receive the inner portion of flange 20 and a plurality of cap screws 2] securely hold base [6 in retainin position. A cylindrical pilot passage 22 extends vertically upwardly through one side wall of inner block I and is adapted to be aligned with pilot aperture l8 in base plate It. The lower grid I4 has a plurality of deiusing apertures Ma: formed therethrough to equally spread the mixed gases across the area of the diminished intermediate hollow portion 9. The catalytic grid [3 has a plurality of. apertures |3a formed therein and the combined area of these apertures I3a is in the form shown, substantially equal to the area of the diminished portion 9 of the combustion chamber.

Assembly bled unit and the cap screws 2! secured in place to hold said base plate in position and retain the parts of the burner in assembled relation. The pilot aperture I8 is internally threaded to receive a supply tube for supplying fuel thereto. The inlet port fl is concentric relative tothe combustion chamber and is also threaded to permit aconduit to be attached thereto to carry gas and air mixture into the combustion chamber.

Operation 3 7 The refractory material with which the combustion chamber is lined becomes incandescent upon being heated and serves as a surface catalyst to produce complete combustion within the combustion chamber. The upper catalytic grid 13 is very important in heating and igniting substantially all of the combustible gases befor they leave the combustion chamber and becomesincandescent almost immediately upon igniting the burner. By providing this upper grid 23 a large catalytic surface area is provided to ignite any unburned combustible gases before they leave the combustion chamber. This upper grid in addition to providing a large catalytic surfac area also slightly retards the discharge of gases from the combustion chamber and increases the pressure therein which is highly desirable for rapid i and eflicient combustion which is substantially completed within the combustion chamber. By

completing the combustion within the combustion chamber, the area surrounding the discharge opening from the combustion chamber will be maintained as a neutral atmosphere rather than a reducing or oxidizing atmosphere. As has been pointed out previously, this is highly desirable so as to permit the placing of the work to be heated immediately above the discharge opening from the burner which is the hottest point of this burner. In the case where extremely large pieces of work are being heated, this is particularly important because it permits the reduction on the size of the furnace in which the work is to be heated as well as increasing the efficiency of the heating operation.

It will be seen that I have provided a novel and. improved gas burner adapted to produce a neutral atmosphere adjacent the discharge opening thereof by completely burning all of the combustible gases within the combustion chamber thereof. My burner incorporates the advantages of surface catalysis into the new and improved combustion chamber design embodied in the burner. The catalytic grid I3 provides a relatively large incandescent area when heated which assures igniting of substantially all of the combustible gases before discharge thereof through said grid. It should be noted that the parts of the burner may be easily removed for replacement in case of breakage or deterioration of the refractory material. It will, of course, be understood that various changes may be made in the form, details, arrangement and proportions of the parts without departing from the scope of my invention.

What I claim is: r 1. A' power type gas burner comprising a hollow casing having a combustion chamber formed therein, said combustion chamberhaving a supply inlet at one end and a discharge opening at the other end, said inlet being adapted to becomnected to a source of combustible gas mised with a combustion supporting gas, said chamber flaring outwardly toward the top thereof, a grid of refractory material capable of incandescence when heated covering the discharge opening of said combustion chamber, the total combined cross-sectional area of the apertures in said grid being substantially equal to the area of the combustion chamber at the lower portion thereof.

2. A power type gas burner comprising a hollow casing having a combustion chamber formed therein and flared outwardly toward the top thereof, said combustion chamber having a supply inlet'at one end and a discharge opening at r the other end, said inlet being adapted to be connected to a source of combustible gas mixed with a combustion supporting gas, a grid extending across said inlet to diffuse the gas supply'and evenly distribute the same throughout the combustion chamber, said chamber flaring outwardly at the upper portion thereof, a refractory grid capable of incandescence When heated covering the discharge opening of said chamber, the total combined cross-sectional area of the openings in said upper grid being substantially equal to the area of the combustion chamber directly above the lower grid.

JOHN'G. CROSBY.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1302819 *Jul 10, 1915May 6, 1919Gas And Oil Comb CompanyBurning of explosive gaseous mixtures.
US1981976 *Jun 9, 1933Nov 27, 1934Wem Abraham LGas burner
US2255298 *May 6, 1939Sep 9, 1941Reichhelm George LRadiant heater
US2287246 *Jul 29, 1940Jun 23, 1942Selas CompanyFurnace wall burner
US2395416 *Nov 19, 1941Feb 26, 1946Thelma MccollumAircraft heating system
US2402045 *Jan 20, 1940Jun 11, 1946Selas Corporation of AmericaAet of heating
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2898978 *Feb 19, 1957Aug 11, 1959Lucas Rotax LtdGaseous fuel combustion apparatus
US3155142 *Feb 13, 1961Nov 3, 1964Minnesota Mining & MfgRadiant gas burner
US3188366 *Jan 17, 1962Jun 8, 1965Flynn Charles SHeating process
US3204094 *Apr 3, 1964Aug 31, 1965Johannes Huisinga Christiaan JRadiant gas-fueled railway switch heater
US3205932 *Jun 19, 1961Sep 14, 1965Pittsburgh Plate Glass CoManufacture of glass
US3501257 *Jan 22, 1968Mar 17, 1970Chester W HiltonHeater for automobile cooling system
US4134739 *Mar 21, 1977Jan 16, 1979Siemens AktiengesellschaftStarting device for a reformed gas generator
US4828481 *Oct 5, 1987May 9, 1989Institute Of Gas TechnologyProcess and apparatus for high temperature combustion
US5000676 *May 23, 1989Mar 19, 1991Werner FialaMethod and apparatus for increasing the temperature of catalysts
Classifications
U.S. Classification431/328, 431/285, 431/353
International ClassificationF23C99/00
Cooperative ClassificationF23C99/00, F23C2700/04
European ClassificationF23C99/00