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Publication numberUS2553278 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 15, 1951
Filing dateDec 20, 1946
Priority dateDec 20, 1946
Publication numberUS 2553278 A, US 2553278A, US-A-2553278, US2553278 A, US2553278A
InventorsRogant Humbert R
Original AssigneeRogant Humbert R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air conditioning apparatus
US 2553278 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 15, 1951 H. R. ROGANT AIR CONDITIONING APPARATUS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 20, 1946 INVENTOR. #uMBERT A? AaaA/vr ATTORNEY May 15, 1951 H. R. ROGANT 2,553,278

AIR CONDITIONING APPARATUS Filed Dec. 20, 1946 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 1a 1% 1 if I N V EN TOR. 170M512??? 1Q Roam/r A TTORNE) Patented May 15, 19 51 UNITED STATES ATE-NT OFFICE 4 Claims.

My invention relates to air conditioning apparatus, more particularly to apparatus that may be used in combination with a heating source, or may be used separately, and the principal object of my invention is to provide new and improved air conditioning apparatus of the character described.

The invention has great utility for emergency or auxiliary heating, and thus has application any place where heat is required. For example, in warmer climates, a great many residences have no central heating system, and in those that have, the system is usually inadequate for relatively severe temperature drops. In many cases, in such warmer climates, although it is warm during the daytime, the evenings become uncomfortably cold, and heat is required to dispel the chill. 'The resident, if he has a central heating system, is compelled to start such system, or if without such system, must use presently available heating devices which have been found to be unsafe and inadequate.

Likewise, in the colder climates, especially during the spring and fall of the year, a resident hesitates to start the central heating system because of sharp fluctuations of temperatures. Also, in severe cold spells, the heating system may be inadequate, and may require supplementary heating means.

Quite frequently, housewives have lighted the kitchen stove to dispel the chill in the house, but this is far from satisfactory, since convection causes heat to rise, thus providing a condition wherein only a portion of the room is warm, and the remainder is cold.

My invention provides a heating device which may be readily and easily positioned on a stove or other heat source. Usually, although not restrictively, my heating device may be positioned on the top of a kitchen stove or range, and in this respect the invention has universal application, since practically every residence is provided with a cooking stove. Also, in this respect, my invention is particularly adaptable for use in apartments, where occupants of certain apartmerits desire more heat than the central heating plant provides. In this respect, great economy of fuel may be effected, since the central heating plant of an apartment building may be set to deliver a certain amount of heat which may be sufficient for ordinary usage, and persons, such as the sick, invalid or the like, may supplement this heat to their requirements by use of my invention.

- Further, inpractically all climatesparticularly during certain seasons, the evenings may be uncomfortably chilly, yet the days may be uncomfortably warm. My invention may be used in both cases, in combination with a heat source to dispel chill, and separately as a blower unit to move air in the manner of a fan.

In the drawings accompanying this application, and forming part of this specification, there is shown, for purposes of illustration, an embodiment which this invention may assume, and in these drawings:

Figure l is a perspective view of an embodiment of the invention as applied to the top of a cooking stove, a portion of the embodiment being broken away to better show its relation with the heating means of the stove,

Figure 2 is an enlarged vertical sectional view through the embodiment shown in Figure 1,

Figure 3 is a top plan View of the embodiment, a portion being broken away to show the interior, and I Figure 4 is a small scale side elevational view of the embodiment, showing a position it may assume when not in use, or when in useas a lower.

Referring to the drawings, the embodiment herein shown to disclose the invention comprises a housing It which may have a lower portion ll of generally polyhedric formation, and an upper portion l2 in the general shape of a frustrum of a pyramid. However, it will be understood that the housing may take any desired shape or form other than that herein shown.

The lower portion H has an opening I3 at itsbase, and is preferably formed with a beaded edge M for strength and safety purposes. The housing is adapted for position with a heating source, and in the embodiment herein shown, such source is a gas-type cooking stove I5.

The usual cooking stove has two or more heating means grouped together, and the housing [0 may cooperate with one or more of such heating means. As shown in Figure l, the housing 10 covers four gas burners IE (only two of which are shown), the burners being adapted to heat the interior of the housing.

As best seen in Figure 2, a grid it, which may be of cast iron construction, is disposed inwardly of the opening it, and divides the housing into a first compartment l8 entered through the opening and a second compartment l9 separated from the first compartment by the grid ll. The grid may have a series of pockets 28 formed therein to collect heat and to provide greater radiating surface. Preferably, the grid ll has a plurality of ears 2| which are secured to the walls of the housing ID, as by means of nut and bolt connections 22. It will be obvious, with the heating device as shown in Figure 1, that the heat from the heating means of the heat source will be directed against the grid H.

The upper portion I2 of the housing is formed with means providing for ingress and egress of air. In the embodiment shown, louvers 23 in the top and sides of the upper portion I2 provide for ingress of air, and louvers 24 in the sides of the upper portion l2 provide for egress of air.

The louvers 24 are preferably formed in less than all the sides of the upper portion, and in the case of a four-sided figure, two louvers 24 in adjoining sides, as shown in Figure 1, are preferred, so heat may be especially directed to any desired parts of the room by corresponding adjustment of the housing on the stove.

The louvers 2 are preferably of the airdispersing type, and as best seen in Figure 2, each comprises a series of nested conical vanes held together and within the opening in the housing in any suitable manner, such as by cross ribs 25. As seen by the arrows in Figure 2, the louvers 24 disperse the heated air not only upwardly but also generally horizontally so as to generally reach all parts of the room.

Carried by the top of the upper portion i2 is an electric motor 25, and secured to the shaft of the motor, interiorly of the compartment 59, is a fan propeller 2?. The motor 25 may be connected to any suitable source of electric current, and a switch 28, actuated by a thermostat 29, of standard construction, controls operation of the motor. The thermostat is preferably set so that the motor is energized only when sufficient heat is built up in the compartment i 9, so as to prevent the blowing of unheated air into the room. The switch and thermostat are carried by a bracket 35 supported from a wall of the housing iii, tubing 3| protecting the wiring within the housing.

In operation, with the heating device, as shown in Figure 1, positioned so that the bead i4 rests on the top of a stove and circumscrioes the burners i8, and with one or more of the burners in operation, heat rises into the compartment I 8 and impinges against the grid I1. is thus heated, and heats the air in the compartment it by radiation and conduction.

When the temperature in the compartment Li reaches a, desired amount, the thermostat 293 will close the switch 28 so as to cause'energization of the motor 26. Air is drawn into the louvers 23 and is moved into engagement with the heated grid. The fan builds up a pressure in the compartment It so as to force the heated air outwardly of the louvers 24 and into the room with some velocity. If the temperature in the compartment l9 should drop below the desired amount, the thermostat 29 will open the switch 28 to deenergize the motor 25 until heat is again built up in the compartment 9.

Since the heating device will not be in use all the time, the housing i9 is provided with handle means and leg means to facilitate its transportation and its disposition on a surface other than as shown in Figure 1. In the embodiment herein shown, a handle 32 is formed of tubular stock, having its ends bent and formed with screw receiving lugs 33 which receive screws 34 passing through apertures in the housing ill. The feet in this instance are readily formed by The grid four balls 35 positioned on a side generally opposite to the side carrying the handle 32. The balls 35 are disposed in pairs, one pair at each end of the side, as seen in Figure 3. Each of the balls 35 is formed with a countersunk hole to pass a screw 35 which secures the respective ball to the housing.

The housing is attractively finished, and it may be supported upright on its feet 35 as shown in Figure 4, on the floor or any other supporting surface, either near the stove, or in any other suitable place.

In the event of a warm day or evening, the thermostat 29 may be adjusted so as to maintain the switch 28 constantly closed, and the device may be used as a cooling blower. In this event, the device is preferably supported by its feet 35, and may be conveniently moved to any position in the room.

From the foregoing, it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that I have accomplished at least the principal object of my invention, and it also will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the embodiment herein disclosed may be variously changed and modified, without departing from the spirit of the invention, and that the invention is capable of uses and has advantages not herein specifically described; hence it will be appreciated that the herein disclosed embodiment is illustrative only, and that my invention is not limited thereto.

Iclaim:

1. A heating device, comprising: open-ended housing means adapted to have its open end rest on a stove surface in position so that heat from the burner means of said stove is directed into said opening; partition means spaced inwardly of said opening and extending transversely of said housing to divide said housing means into upper and lower compartments which are disposed on opposite sides of said partition means, the lower compartment being in free communication with said opening and thereby being adapted to receive heat from said burner means, said partition means having abutting engagement with said housing means to close communication between said upper and lower compartments so that objectionable fumes and products of combustion from said burner means are restricted against passage from the lower compartment to the upper compartment, said upper compartment having air inlet and outlet opening means; and air moving means for drawing air through said inlet opening means and exhausting it from said outlet opening means.

2. A heating device, comprising: open-ended housing means adapted to have its open end rest on a stove surface in position so that heat from the burner means of said stove is directed into a said opening, partition means spaced inwardly of said opening and extending transversely of said housing means to divide said housing means into upper and lower compartments which are disposed on opposite sides of said partition means, the lower compartment being in free communication with said opening and thereby being adapted to receive heat from said burner means, said partition means having abutting engagement with said housing means to close communication between said upper and lower compartments so that objectionable fumes and products of combustion from said burner means are restricted against passage from the lower compartment to the upper compartment, said upper compartment having air inlet and outlet opening means; and air moving means within said upper compartment for drawing air through said inlet opening means and directing it toward and into engagement with said partition means, the outlet opening means being positioned out of the movement of such incoming air so that air from said other compartment is exhausted therefrom by air pressure built up therein.

3. A heating device, comprising: open-ended housing means adapted to have its open end rest on a stove surface in position so that heat from the burner means of said stove is directed into said opening; grid means spaced inwardly of said opening and extending transversely of said housing means to divide said housing means into compartments which are disposed on opposite sides of said grid means, said grid means providing a recessed surface on each side thereof for efficient heat transference and for preventing smooth air flow thereacross, one of said compartments being in free communication with said opening and thereby being adapted to receive heat from said burner means, said grid means having engagement with said housing means to preclude free gaseous communication between said compartments so that objectionable fumes and products of combustion from said burner are restricted against free passage to the other of said compartments, said other compartment having air inlet and outlet opening means; and air moving means for drawing air through said inlet opening means and exhausting it from said outlet opening means.

a A heating device, comprising: open-ended housing means adapted to have its open end rest on a stove surface in position so that heat from the burner means of said stove is directed into said opening; grid means spaced inwardly of said opening and extending transversely of said housing means to divide said housing means into compartments which are disposed on opposite sides of said grid means, said grid means providing a recessed surface on each side thereof for efiicient heat transference and for preventing smooth air flow thereacross, one of said compartments being in free communication with said opening and thereby being adapted to receive heat from said burner means, said grid means havingengagement with said housing means to preclude free gaseous communication between said compartments so that objectionable fumes and products of combustion are restricted against free passage to the other of said compartments, said other compartment having air inlet and outlet opening means; and air moving means for drawing air through said inlet opening means and directing it toward and into engagement with said partition means, the outlet opening means being positioned out of the movement of such incoming air so that air from said other compartment is exhausted therefrom by air pressure built up therein.

HUMBERT R. ROGANT.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 336,392 Converse Feb. 16, 1886 608,386 Tourville Aug. 2, 1898 1,380,135 Corbin May 31, 1921 1,798,290 Winner et a1 Mar. 31, 1931 1,850,822 Young Mar. 22, 1932 1,884,634 Emans Oct. 25, 1932 1,916,297 Bright July 4, 1933 2,021,462 Panaro Nov. 19, 1935 2,083,145 Campbell June 8, 1937 2,088,280 Schillinger July 27, 1937 2,369,972 Meagher Feb. 20, 1945

Patent Citations
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US608386 *Dec 20, 1897Aug 2, 1898F Onetourville
US1380135 *Sep 1, 1920May 31, 1921Corbin Jr Elbert AHeater
US1798290 *Feb 28, 1928Mar 31, 1931Grant WinnerHeating or cooling device
US1850822 *Oct 10, 1930Mar 22, 1932Fred M YoungAir director vane for unit heaters
US1884634 *May 9, 1930Oct 25, 1932Emans LouisPortable hot water heater
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2740579 *Aug 18, 1952Apr 3, 1956Welsh Samuel HPortable circulating blower for space heaters
US2782991 *Jan 12, 1954Feb 26, 1957Allen Burris RThermostatically controlled blower fan furnace attachment
US2972941 *Jan 14, 1960Feb 28, 1961Boostair CorpAir distribution systems and apparatus
US3358670 *Oct 20, 1965Dec 19, 1967Osborne Charles DAir heater utilizing cooking stove heating elements
US4223659 *Jul 1, 1977Sep 23, 1980Therm - Air Industries, Inc.Forced air heater
US4379446 *Jul 21, 1982Apr 12, 1983Porter Donald GFan accessory for heater
US4390005 *Apr 5, 1982Jun 28, 1983Porter Donald GFan accessory for heater
US4452225 *Jun 14, 1983Jun 5, 1984Plant David FPortable, auxiliary, radiant chimney effect heater
US4458666 *Jul 19, 1983Jul 10, 1984Kabushiki Kaisha Takanawa SeisakushoWarm air blow-out device for box-shaped stove
US4641629 *Mar 11, 1986Feb 10, 1987Electrolux S.A.R.L.Apparatus for cooking and/or for heating of air
US5170773 *Nov 8, 1991Dec 15, 1992Harris Herbert ASpace heating unit for recreational vehicles
US5311930 *Nov 17, 1992May 17, 1994Bruenn Paul RHeat reclamation device
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/6, 126/110.00B, 126/248
International ClassificationF24C15/00, F24C15/18
Cooperative ClassificationF24C15/18
European ClassificationF24C15/18