Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2553543 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 22, 1951
Filing dateMar 15, 1948
Priority dateMar 15, 1948
Publication numberUS 2553543 A, US 2553543A, US-A-2553543, US2553543 A, US2553543A
InventorsBodine Jr Albert G
Original AssigneeBodine Jr Albert G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pumping apparatus
US 2553543 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 22,1951

Filed March `l5, 1948 'm ms A. G. BODINE, JR

PUMPING APPARATUS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Ofi Fra 2.

.5w/avra@ #rive/vir.

May 22, 1951 A, G, BQ|3|NEy JR 2,553,543

l PUMPING APPARATUS Filed March 15, 1948 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 [V1/Mraz Mmy.

Patented May 22, 1951 `ulrED T FFICE 11 Claims.

lIlhis invention `relates generally .to pumps, and more particularly to pumps operated by periodic longitudinal waves of tension and compression in an elastic tubing.

rrIlhe present application is a continuation-inpart of my copending, parent application entitled Method and Apparatus for Pumping, Serial No. 761,456, led July 17, 1947, and allowed October 22,1947., now Patent No..`2,444,9l2. 1n said application I disclosed .a type of deep well pump oper- .ated by vperiodic waves of tension and compression generated by means of a sonic vibration generator at the ground surface and transmitted via an elastic column to the pump vunit proper at the .bottom o'f the well, this elastic column being typically the steel pump tubing. Among the various embodiments of pump disclosed in said application-was .a species (more .particularly applicable .tosurface uses A.than to wells) in which the elastic Atubing .is folded or ciroumferentially corrugated in a bellows-'like fashion, having the .elect .of greatly increasing its compliance, 'or in other words, Vits amplitude of oscillation under the drive -of the waves of tension and compression transmitted to it, and having the further effect of .greatly shortening the wave length (along the tubing) of longitudinal waves of compression and tension traversing .its length. The primary ob- ,ject of the present invention is the provision of .such a pump, with .its several attendant ,advantages .and accomplishments. Among the'objects, and vcorresponding accomplishments, is the provision of an efiicient, relatively compact, multistage, high pressure pump.`

The invention will 'be better understood by y .referring now to the following detailed descripmade `up of .a multiplicity of outwardly folded -hellowssections .or elements I I, `each flange-connected 'to the next, and with intervening plates or Walls I2 having central ports i3 controlled by check valve balls yI A. To the lower bellows section is connected a box section -i 5 formed with an inlet il-B lto which a .flexible intake pipe (not shown) may be connected To the upper bellows section is connected a box section I8 having outlet i9 to which a flexible outow pipe (not shown) may .be connected. Box section I3 is suspended from vertical rod 20 having mounted on its upper en'd sonic vibration generator 2i, presently described in more detail. Rod V2i) is carried by transverse plate 22 supported on suitable springs '23, which are in turn supported by any suitable supporting means, as indicated.

The housing 25 of sonic generator 2'I contains a means for vertically vibrating the plate 22 on the supporting springs 20, and consequently vertically vibrating the upper end of the bellows-like column I0. The means for generating vibrations contained within housing 25 may be of any type, but illustratively is of a type having meshing oppositely rotating spur gears 21 carrying eccentric weights 28 which balance out horizontal vibrations but are additive to produce a substantial resultant oscillatory force in a vertical direction. The driving pulley 29 of the generator mounted on the shaft for one of the spur gears, is driven by electric motor 38 through belt 3I`. I refer to the generator as a sonic generator, because the vibration frequency Vis typically in the sonic range, and also because the vibrations generated thereby travel in the elastic column connected thereto with the Ispeed of a sound wave.

4be alternately elevated and lowered through a short displacement distance. This oscillatory movement causes longitudinal deformation w-aves 'of tension and compression tobe launched down said tubing. These waves travel down the tubing,

accompanied by exure of the bellows sections I I. VAs the upper end portion of the tubing is moved downwardly by the generator 2 l, the bellows-sections II will thus tend to be progressively compressed, or slightly closed, in a wave-like action down the tubing. On the succeeding upstroke, the reverse action occurs, the successive bellows section from top to bottom being slightly expanded, each in its turn, and a wave of expansion thus travels from top to bottom. It should oi course be understood that in a strict sense, and considering the individual fibers making up the steel walls of the bellows sections, the stress is not .entirely one of compression when the Ibellows sections are closedj nor of tension when they are opened but rather one of mixed compression and tension under the bending condition characteristic of each situation, An analysis oi the distribution of stress and compression within the walls is however not of particular interest in the present problem. It is suiiicient if it is recognized that, considering each bellows section as a whole, and the connected series of bellows sections as an elastic column, alternate waves of compression and tension will progress longitudinally of the column, and will be reflected by the ends of the column, in a manner generally analogous to the action of longitudinal waves in elastic pipes and rods. For the purpose of the specification and claims, therefore, the terms compression and tension refer to the column structure as a whole, rather than to the distribution of stress within a given portion of column wall.

Preferably, the vibration generator is driven at such a speed as will resonate the column I Il and establish a standing ywave therealong, characterized by the appearance of velocity antinodes at the locations of the check-valved niembers I2. In such operation, the check-valved walls I2 are regions of maximum vertical oscillatory movement, while the bellows sections Il, while constantly undergoing expansive and contractive action, are actually stationary, or substantially so, at their medial transverse sections.

The two check valved walls on opposite sides of a given bellows section II will move in opposite directions at any given instant, all in accordance with the known principles of longitudinal wave action in resonated columns governing this type of phenomena. While this phenomena is understood by those skilled in the arty it may briefly be explained herein that standing waves result from longitudinal waves in elastic columns when the frequency of such waves is` such that a wave transmitted down the elastic column and that reected upwards from the lower end thereof mutually interfere and cancel one another at certain longitudinally spaced regions to create velocity nodes, while mid-way between said regions, and at the ends of the columns, the transmitted and reflected waves may be additive to effect peak oscillation. In straight columns, the speed of sound is very high, thus causing long wave lengths, and since the velocity nodes are onehalf wave length apart, the valve spacing is of considerable length; in the folded construction characteristic of the invention, however, the internodal spacing may be very substantially less because of the reduced speed of sound in the more compliant structure.

Considering now the lowermost check valved wall I2, it should be understood that this wall will oscillate in a vertical direction as the result of longitudinal wave action transmitted to it via the corrugated column I I from the vibration generator 2l. On each downstroke of said lowermost wall I2, uid displaced thereby will be forced upwardly through the passageway I3 and past the check valve ball I4, which will at such time be unseated, as its acceleration in a downward direction owing to gravity will be less than that of the wall I2 driven by the wave action in the column Ill. On the succeeding upstroke of the lowermost wall I2, valve ball I4 will seat, causing the column of liquid thereabove to be elevated. Referring again to the downstroke of the wall I2, it should be evident that during such downstroke, a void will be created in the bellows section II immediately above, and the resulting Suction aids in drawing the fluid up through the passageway I3.

While the pump is operative without the use of the additional check valves above the lowermost one already described, and will operate to elevate a column of fluid through the apparatus to be delivered via the outlet IS, higher delivery pressures and additional pumping efficiency are gained by the use of the additional valves. As already explained, each check valved wall I2 above the lowermost one will operate with movement opposed to the check valved plate immediately below it. Thus, for example, the check valved wall I2 which is second from the bottom will be traveling downwardly during the upward travel of the lowermost such wall, and the check valve ci the second wall is thus open to receive or pass the fluid column being elevated at such time by the lowermost wall I2. And on the upstroke of the second wall I2 from the bottom, the lowermost wall I2 is descending, with the result that the second wall I2 from the bottom adds to the suction that is eiective to elevate well uid through the passageway I3 in the lower wall I2. This action is repeated throughout the length of the multi-stage pump, and permits the development of relatively high delivery pressures.

It is not entirely essential that the resonant operation be established, as pumping will occur even without the resonance. However, maximum oscillatory displacement of the check valved wall I2 occurs with resonant operation, and is acccrdingly preferred. As already described, such operation is characterized by the establishment of velocity anti-nodes (regions of maximum vertical displacement) at the locations of the several check valved walls I2, with intervening velocity nodes (regions of minimum vertical oscillations) at the bellows sections midway between the check valves. To accomplish such operationy the speed of the vibration generator 2l is adjusted until the described resonant, standing wave action is observed. Such speed will depend upon the dimensions, stiffness or compliance and mass of the oscillating apparatus, and cannot be predicted in advance in absence of a relatively complex mathematical treatment. If the tubing sections were straight rather than formed as Ibellows sections, the check valved walls I2, based upon the velocity of purely compressional waves, would be one-half wave length apart at the critical speed of the generator 2l for resonant operation. However, with the folded or bellows-like formation of the invention, the half-wave spacing distance between successive walls I2 for resonant operation is much less than the straight pipe half wave length, so that a relatively compact apparatus is achieved.

Figure 2 shows an embodiment having an elastic column made up of a plurality of bellows sections 43 and intervening check-valved plates or walls 4I, just like the corresponding components of the embodiment of Figure 1. In addition, the elastic column formed of said components 14E) and 4I has a box member l2 at the top provided with outlet i3 for connection to a flexible delivery pipe, and has at the bottom a box section la formed with intake pipe 45 adapted for connection with a flexible intake pipe. The vibration generator 45 is in this case suspended from the lower end of the column, being connected directly to intake box section 44. This vibration generator i5 may again be of any suitable type capable of delivering the vibrations to the elastic column in a direction longitudinally of said column. In this instance, the pump is supported near the midsection of the column by laterally extending one of the check valved plates, such as Ma, and supporting it on resilient vibration insulating mounting 41.

The embodiment of Figure `2 operates according `to the same essential principles as does that of Figure l. The sonic generator y46 imparts vertical oscillations to the lower end of the elastic column, causing successive deformation waves of tension and compression to be transmitted from bellows section to bellows section up the column. By adjusting the speed of the generator to resonate -the column, the check valved walls 4|, including the intermediate mounting plate 41a., are located at velocity anti-nodes, and hence oscllate vertically, the velocity nodes being located midway `between the plates lll, i. e., at the mid-sections oi the :bellows members. The bellows sections flex to transmit the lwave action just as in Figure l, the only7 difference being that the wave action is initially launched up the column instead lof down the column. -The support 41 for the column might 'be ,located at any :convenient velocity node or .anti-node instead of the particular velocity anti-node coinciding with the mid-section of the column.

Figure 3 shows a .modication of 'Figure 2, wherein the elastic bellows sections are made up of simple structural forms. In 'Figure 3, each elastic bellows section 4400i `includes two spaced flexible walls or diaphragms 53, whose rim portions are connected to opposite ends of a side wall ring 5 I by suitable cap screws 52, as shown. Each such bellows assembly is connected to the next by a smaller side wall ring 53 by means of cap screws 54. The portion of each wall 5G between outer and inner connecting rings 5l and 53 is capable of a diaphragm-like elastic deection.

The center of each wall 5i) is formed with a valve port 55 for a check valve ball 56, and suitable ball cages 5l are attached to the walls 56.

The elastic column as thus described may have intake and discharge sections 58 and 59, similar to the corresponding members of Figure 2, as well as an elastic wave generator 6i) of the type disclosed in detail in Figure 1. Suitable mounting means for the pump is indicated at 6E, engaging one of the central connecting rings 5l.

The operation of the pump of Figure 3 will be understood to be the same as that of Figure 2 in all respects, the only difference being in the specio construction of the bellows sections, which in the case of Figure 3 have their entire compliant or elastic area in the walls 5i) between the connecting rings 5I and 53. These walls 59 are capable of an elastic deiiection throughout a range as approximately indicated by the dot-dash lines for the center section in Figure 3. The compliant wall structure as thus constituted transmits the wave action in the same general wav as the specific bellows formations earlier described. It will of course be evident that the type of bellows formation shown in Figure 3 may also be incorporated in a pump of the type shown in Figure l.

The drawings and description disclose several illustrative embodiments of the invention. Various changes in design, structure and arrangement may however be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A pump of the character described, comprising: a ilexible elastic longitudinally compressible and expansible tubing'circumferent'ially corrugated along its length, an inlet port opening into one end portion of said tubing, a checkvalve controlling said port, a Ydelivery port leading from the other -end of the tubing, and a sonic wave generator operatively connected to the corrugated tubing and adapted to continuously transmit alternate waves of compression and tension longitudinally therealong.

l2. A pump of the character described, comprising: a flexible elastic longitudinally compressible and expansible tubing circumferentially corrugated along its length, an inlet port opening into one end portion of said tubing, a delivery port leading from the other end of the tubing, a series of check valved parts in longitudinally spaced positions along the tubing, and asonic wave generator operatively connected to the corrugated tubing and adapted to continuously transmit alternate waves of compression and tension longitudinally therealong.

3. A pump of the vcharacter described comprising: an velastic: tubing embodying flexible elastic wall means forming a series of interconnected outwardly folded compressible and expansible elastic bellows sections, inlet and outlet ports at opposite ends of the tubing,a fluid displacing wall closing the tubing at the inlet port end thereof, a iiuid passage through said wall, a check-valve controlling said passage, and a sonic wave generator operatively connected to an end of said tubing and adapted to continuously transmit alternate waves of compression and tension longitudinally through andalong the elastic outf wardly folded walls of the bellows sections to alternately compress and expand said sections.

4. A pump of the character described comprising: a ilexible elastic tubing embodying a series of interconnected elastic compressible and expansible bellows assemblies, said assemblies including transverse partition walls separating the assemblies from one another, check-valved fluid ports extending through said partition walls, inlet and outlet ports at opposite ends of said tubing, and a sonic wave generator operatively connected to said tubing and adapted to continuously transmitl alternate waves of compression and tension longitudinally therealong.

5. A pump as defined in claim 4, wherein said bellows assemblies each comprise a pair of spaced transverse elastic walls, together with side wall means connecting the marginal portions of said walls, said spaced walls forming the said check valved partition walls, and wherein each bellows assembly is connected to the next by a side wall means engaging said elastic bellows walls at a spacing inside said first mentioned side wall means.

6. A pump of the character described comprising: a flexible elastic tubing embodying nexible elastic wall means forming a series of intercommunicating elastically compressible and eXpansible bellows sections, an inlet port opening into one end portion of said tubing, a check-valve controlling said port, a delivery port leading from the other end of the tubing, and a sonic wave generator operatively connected to the tubing and adapted to continuously transmit alternate waves of compression and tension longitudinally through and along the walls of the successive bellows sections constituting the tubing.

7, A pump of the character described comprising: a flexible elastic tubing embodying iexible elastic wall means forming a series of intercommunicating elastically compressible and expansible bellows sections, an inlet port opening into one end portion of said tubing, a check-valve controlling said port, a delivery port leading from the other end of the tubing, a sonic wave generator operatively connected to the tubing and adapted to continuously transmit alternate waves of compression and tension longitudinally throughand along the wall of the successive bellows sections constituting the tubing, and a resilient supporting means for said tubing adapted to accommodate the longitudinal Wave action of the tubing,

8. A pump of the character described comprising: a flexible elastic tubing embodying flexible elastic wall means forming a series of elastically compressible and expansible bellows Sections, transverse partition Walls intervening therebetween said bellows sections, check-valved fluid ports extending through said walls, inlet and outlet ports at opposite ends of said tubing, and a sonic wave generator operatively connected to an end of said tubing and adapted to continuously transmit alternate waves of compression and tension longitudinally through and along. the walls of the successive bellows sections constituting the tubing. Y

9. A pump of the character described comprising: an elastic pump tubing embodying a series of interconnected compressive and expansive bellows elements, each of said bellows elements including flexible elastic wall means capable of alternate deformations in reverse directions longitudinally of the tubing in response to alternate Cil waves of compression and tension transmitted along the tubing, inlet and outlet ports at opposite ends of the tubing, and a sonic wave generator operatively connected to the tubing and adapted to transmit alternate waves of compression and tension longitudinally along said tubing.

10. A pump according to claim 9, including resilient means supporting the tubing in a vertically disposed position, and wherein the sonic wave generator is mounted on the upper end of the tubing.

11. A pump according to claim 9, including resilient means supporting the tubing in a vertically disposed position, and wherein the sonic wave generator is suspended from the lower end of the tubing.

ALBERT G. BODINE, JR.

REFERENCES CI'rEDA The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 599,273 Wahtola Feb. 15, 1898 1,371,983 =Scott Mar. 15, 1921 1,941,593 Bellocq Jan. 2, 1934 2,056,513 Gambarno Oct. 6, 1936 2,195,792 Straatveit Apr. 2, 1940 2,232,678 Dickinson Feb. 25, 1941 2,355,618 Bodine Aug. 15, 1944 2,444,912 Bodine July 13, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US599273 *Jul 17, 1897Feb 15, 1898 Diaphragm-pump
US1371983 *Apr 23, 1920Mar 15, 1921Scott Floyd LPump
US1941593 *Sep 30, 1929Jan 2, 1934Toribio BellocqPumping
US2056513 *Feb 19, 1935Oct 6, 1936Gambarini BenjaminReciprocating suction pump
US2195792 *Nov 22, 1937Apr 2, 1940Nilsen Straatveit NilsMachine for actuating fluid
US2232678 *Mar 17, 1938Feb 25, 1941Fluid Transfer LtdPump for liquids
US2355618 *Apr 17, 1941Aug 15, 1944Bodine Jr Albert GMethod and apparatus for pumping
US2444912 *Jul 17, 1947Jul 13, 1948Jr Albert G BodineMethod and apparatus for pumping
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2918875 *Apr 23, 1957Dec 29, 1959Fisher John CSelf-rectifying fluid pump
US2926592 *Jan 19, 1956Mar 1, 1960Paragon Revolute CorpAmmonia pumping system for gas-type machine for developing photosensitive sheets
US3102482 *Apr 28, 1961Sep 3, 1963Jr Albert G BodineSonic pump
US3374743 *Aug 24, 1966Mar 26, 1968Gen Electric Co LtdPumps
US3724497 *Mar 4, 1971Apr 3, 1973Metzeler AgStorage system for gaseous fluids and the like
US3848343 *Feb 9, 1973Nov 19, 1974Gen Kinematics CorpVertical lift conveyor
US4012177 *Aug 31, 1973Mar 15, 1977Yakich Sam SBlood pump tube element
US8011901Sep 11, 2006Sep 6, 2011Suncor Energy Inc.Discharge pressure actuated pump
US8360751Sep 7, 2007Jan 29, 2013Suncor Energy Inc.Discharge pressure actuated pump
US20080063544 *Sep 7, 2007Mar 13, 2008Petro-CanadaDischarge pressure actuated pump
US20080080990 *Sep 11, 2006Apr 3, 2008Petro-CanadaDischarge pressure actuated pump
DE1004927B *Oct 19, 1953Mar 21, 1957Fritz OstwaldFaltenbalg, insbesondere fuer kolbenlose Hochdruckpumpen
WO1996035877A1 *May 7, 1996Nov 14, 1996Ati Alternative Technische Innovation AgFluid actuator
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/241, 137/576, 137/533.11, 137/575, 417/244
International ClassificationF04B43/08, F04B43/00
Cooperative ClassificationF04B43/088
European ClassificationF04B43/08S