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Publication numberUS2555574 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 5, 1951
Filing dateMar 9, 1945
Priority dateMar 9, 1945
Publication numberUS 2555574 A, US 2555574A, US-A-2555574, US2555574 A, US2555574A
InventorsCarlos E Crawford
Original AssigneeCarlos E Crawford
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pump actuating equipment
US 2555574 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 5, 1951 Q E CRAWFORD 2,555,574

PUMP ACTUATING EQUIPMENT Filed March 9, 1945 4 Sheets-Sheet l Flyj IN V EN TOR.

Car/0.9 15! L'ra wford I 4 I I HIS/IGENT. E

1/15 A EN 1 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Q Q: QMQQU C E CRAWFORD PUMP ACTUATING EQUIPMENT June 5, 1951 Flled March 9 1945 J1me 1951 r c. E. CRAWFORD 2,555,574

PUMP ACTUATING EQUIPMENT Filed March 9, 1945 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 I N V EN TOR.

HAS AGENT.

Cal 205' Crawford Patented June 5, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,555,574 PUMP ACTUATING EQUIPMENT Carlos E. Crawford, Wichita Falls, Tex.

Application March 9, 1945, Serial No. 581,926

, 8 Claims.

1 i This invention relates to improvements in pump actuating equipment for pumping deep wells, such as oil wells and the like, and more particularly to give a relatively long stroke to the pump with a minimum of additional equipment.

While various attempts have been made heretoiore to devise long-stroke pumping equipment, for the most part, these have been complicated in structure; they make it impossible for the derrick to be used as a support for the pump actuating mechanism; and they impede the work on the well when it is necessary to remove rods, tubing or in cleaning out the well.

The primary object of this invention is to provide a long-stroke pump actuating mechanism which may be secured to any conventional derrick so as to actuate the pump rods, and yet is disposed away from the center of the derrick floor.

In the present invention, an ordinary derrick which is employed to drill and clean out wells is utilized to support the pumping equipment, and at the same time the equipment is so positioned that the derrick may be used to remove the rods and tubing from the well or to do other work by simply disconnecting the line of the present equipment and swinging it to one side so any other line employed for pulling tubing or the like may be swung into place over the well.

Another object of this invention is to provide a chain-type pump actuating mechanism attachable to a derrick by an upper support and for adjusting the length of the strokeby moving the upper support upward or downward and securing this support to transverse girts to adjust the chain to the particular spacing of the support and the sprockets thereon.

Therefore, with the present invention, the pumping mechanism is adapted to work in conjunction with the derrick, and the derrick is arranged to support substantially all of the load of the rods with the chain mechanism lifting the weight of the fluid above the plunger of the pump.

A still further object of the invention is to provide pump actuating mechanism that is simple in construction, efficient in operation, easy to adjust, and economical in operation and in the use of equipment.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is, illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a conventional derrick for deep wells, showing the pump actuating mechanisms installed thereon and a power unit for driving the pump actuating mechanism;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged elevation, with parts broken away and with parts shown in section, of the pump actuating mechanism, taken at right angles to Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a horizontal section, taken on the line 33 of Fig. 2, but with the derrick pump chain actuating mechanism removed;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged side elevation of the upper framework of the pump actuating mechanism positioned on the derrick girt, shown in section;

Fig. 5 is a top plan view of the mechanism shown in Fig. 4, showing a fragmentary portion of the derrick girt;

Fig. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary View, partly in section of the cross bar and bearing; and

Fig. '7 is a cross section therethrough, on th line 1-1 of Fig. 2.

With more detailed reference to the drawings, the numeral I designates a well derrick such as is used in drilling, cleaning out, and servicing deep wells, such as oil wells and the like. The derrick is of the conventional type having upright corner posts 2 connected together by girts 3, suitably braced to form a rigid structure.

The derrick I rises from a derrick floor generally designated at 4 which surrounds the oil well.

- and which is connected with the pump rod 6. To

pumprod 6.

provide for uniform stroke of the pump plunger, cables i and 8 extend downwardly in side-by-side relation in the derrick and are connected by means of a fitting 9 with the upper end of the The cables I and 8 extend over guide sheaves l0 and II, respectively, mounted on the upper end of the derrick I, thence downwardly at the outer portion of the derrick. The opposite end of the cable 1 is adapted to be actuated by the power mechanism hereinafter described, while the cable 8 is connected with counterweights l2 guided within an open framework formed by rods l3. The counterweights [2 are composed of a series of weights that may be applied or removed as required, so as to substane 3 nected with the cable 1 and which is driven by a power plant I5, such as an engine or other source of power.

The gear reducing unit l4 comprises an enclosed housing l6 (Fig. 3) that is enclosed at the top and sides as shown in Figs. 2 and 3, and confines therein gear reducing means that is driven by the power plant l5. This drive is through a belt I! (Fig. l) to a pulley I8 (Fig. 3) mounted on a drive shaft I9 journaled in the casing 16. Any suitable gear reduction may be provided in this unit as desired, by means of gears 26 and sprocket gearing 2| and 22 for driving stub shafts 23 which are journaled in spaced portions of the casing 16, which casing has a re-entrant portion 2.4 in the side thereof facing the derrick floor 4, as. shown in Fig. 3.

The stub shafts 23 have fixed on the inner ends thereof, within the re-entrant portion 24, sprockets 25 that receive the lower ends of sprocket chains 26 (Figs. 1 and 2). The sprocket chains 26- extend upwardly from the sprockets 25 and pass over sprockets 27, that are journaled on inturned end portions 28 of a C-shaft 29 (Figs. 4 and The C-shaft 26 is secured at opposite end portions thereof by U-bolts 36 upon cantilever frame members 3| that form a supporting frame for the upper ends of the sprocket chains 26. The frame members 3| are secured at their outer-ends upon a transverse girt 3 of the derrick as by being bolted thereto at 32. The inner ends of the frame members 3| are suspended by cables 32 that extend downward from the top of the derrick and are connected with turn-buckles 33 which in turn are secured to eye-bolts 36. The eye-bolts 34 extend downward through holes'iii: inthe inner ends of the frame members 3| and are yieldably connected with the frame members bycoiled springs 36 that are interposedbetween an adjusting nut 31 on each eye-bolt and the under faceof the adjacent frame member 3|.

The spring is provided to cushion the shock while pumping and allows for equal expansion due to changes in temperature. The turn-buckle 33 and nut 3! for each cable provide sufficient adjustment for moving the frame members 3| upward or downward, so as properly to adjust the slack of the chains 26. Such adjustment of the frame members may be provided by securing said frame to any desired one of the girts 3, according to the length of chain to be provided.

The cable 7 extends downwardly between the transversely spaced chains 26, as shown in Figs. 2 and 6. The lower end of the cable 1- extends into a socket 38 within which it is anchored as by babbitting 39 (Fig. 6). The socket 38 is formed as a part of a split bearing 40 which is journaled on a bearing shaft 4!, the opposite ends of which shaft 4| are secured rigidly to. opposed side plates 42 of the spaced chains 26, as shown in Fig. 6.

In the operation of the device for pumping the well, the cables I and 8 are connected with the upper end of the pump rod 6, and the required number of counterweights l2 are mounted on the cable 8 substantially to counter-balance the Weight of the rods and plunger in the well.

In the operation of the equipment, the power plant I5 will drive the gear reducing unit M through the V-belt IT. This drive will operate the speed reducing gearing i9-22 (Fig. 3) to drive the sprockets 25 on the stub shafts 23. These sprockets 25 will operate to drive the spaced endless chains 26 as guided at their'lower ends by the sprockets 25 and at their upper ends by the sprockets 21. The rectilinear movement of the chains 26 will carry with them the journal shaft 4| that connects opposite chains together, thereby moving the bearing member 46 in a circuitous path corresponding with the path of movement of the chains 26. This path of movement will extend alternately up and down as the bearing member 4| is carried through the path by the chains. This will cause a downward pull to be applied alternately to they lower cable '1 to lift the pump rods upward, assisted by the counterweights I2, thereby alternately reciprocating the pump rods and the pump plunger attached thereto. Inasmuch as the counterweights take the load of the pump rods and plunger off the pump actuating mechanism, the weight of the fluid to, be lifted together with the friction encountered is all of the force that needs to be applied by the power mechanism.

It will be noted in Fig. 1 that the pump actuating mechanism and counterweights are symmetrically arranged on respective opposite sides of the derrick and the gear reducing unit i4 does not project appreciably inward of the lateral confines of the floor 4, so that substantially the.

entire working surface of the derrick floor is left free of obstructions by the pump operating mechanism. V V

The housing l6 of the gear reducing unit en closes the operating parts thereof and is adapted to receive lubricant for these parts, as'well as to exclude dirt, and other foreign-matter therefrom. This housing i6 may be secured to the floor 4 in any suitable manner and is shown as provided also with braces 43 (Fig. 1) to hold it down in place.

A sheave 44 is shown as mounted above and at right angles to the sheaves |6-and II at the upper end of the derrick l for passage thereover of a drillingline, clean-out or other well servicing line, either of which may extend to a suitable winch drum for servicing the well. It will be evident that by arranging the pump operating mechanism along the inside of the derrick the floor or space within the confines of the derrick structure is left substantially clear, thereby making possible the removal of rods and tubing from the well and racking them within the derrick without the necessity of having to remove the pump actuating unit. It only necessary to remove the connecting fitting 9' from the pump rods and to swing the pump rod actuating cables to one side to allow access to the pump rods and tubing for the'attachment of elevators for servicing the well. 1

While no belt or chain guards are shown for the belt I! or for operating chains 26, it is to be understood that these may be applied when desirable in accordance with the requirements of the particular job.

I claim: 7

1. In combination with a derrick structure, a power unit, a gear reduction unit coupled with said power unit, a pair of sprockets projecting from said power unit and in axial alignment with each other, a pair of chains spaced apart and passing over said sprockets and extending upward within said derrick to a second pair-of sprockets mounted on a frame-work which frame-work is positioned intermediate the length i of the derrick and secured thereto, a ,member bridging between said spaced chains and carry,-

a bearing e b r. fl x bl em er 0011,.

nected withfsaid bearing member and passing ever a l r mber t e e o it e der ick to substantially align the depending end of said flexible member with the pump rods of a well and said flexible member being connected to said pump rods, the inner end of said upper sprocket frame-work being supported from a point of said derrick structure above the frame-work.

2. In combination with a derrick structure, a power unit, a gear reduction unit coupled with said power unit, a pair of sprockets projecting from said power unit and in axial alignment with each other, a pair of chains spaced apart and passing over said sprockets and extending upward within said derrick to a second pair of sprockets mounted on a frame-work which frame-work is positioned intermediate the length of the derrick and secured thereto, a member bridging between said spaced chains carrying a bearing member, a flexible member connected with said bearing member and passing over a roller member on the top of the derrick to substantially to align the depending end of said flexible member with the pump rods of a well and said flexible member connected to said pump rods, means for supporting the inner end of said upper sprocket frame-work from a point of said derrick structure above the frame-work, said supporting means having adjustment thereon for adjustably moving the inner end of said frame-work to adjust the tightness of said chains.

3. In a pumping unit for pumping oil wells and the like, a derrick structure, a gear reduction box positioned at a side of said derrick structure and carrying two sprockets spaced apart and in axial alignment, a pair of sprockets spaced above said first-mentioned sprockets and disposed on a C-shaped shaft so an unimpeded space will exist between the ends of said c-shaped shaft, said C-shaped shaft being positioned on an inwardly extending frame-work intermediate the length thereof, which frame-work is selectively secured to a transverse member of the derrick at the outer end thereof intermediate the length of the derrick, and having its inner end supported by a connecting element to the derrick, above said inwardly extending framework, a pair of endless chains passing over the aligned sprocket members and carrying a bar therebetween, a bearing pivotally mounted on said bar and carrying a flexible element which is adapted to pass over a roller member at the top of said derrick and depend for connection with a pump rod to be positioned in a well beneath said derrick.

4. In combination with a derrick structure, driving mechanism for driving a pair of endless chains connected with said mechanism and extending upward to a point within the derrick, a chain support mechanism positioned intermediate the length of the derrick and secured thereto on the inner side thereof for receiving the pair of endless chains and mounted on a framework, the inner end of said frame-work having supporting means connected with the top portion of said derrick, and resilient means positioned intermediate the end of said supporting means and said frame-work to compensate for the expansion and contraction of certain elements to prevent said chains from becoming too loose or too tight.

5. In combination, a power unit, a gear reduction unit coupled with said power unit, a pair of sprockets projecting from said power unit and in axial alignment with each other, a pair of chains spaced apart and passing over said sprockets and extending upward to a second pair of sprockets mounted on a frame-work, a member bridging between said spaced chains and carrying a bearing member, a flexible member connected with said'bearing member and passing over a roller member substantially to align the depending end of said flexible member with the pump rods of a well and said flexible member being connected to said pump rods, the inner end of said upper sprocket frame-work being supported from a point above the frame-work.

6. 'In combination, a power unit, a gear reduction unit coupled with said power unit, a pair of sprockets projecting from said power unit and in axial alignment with each other, a pair of chains spaced apart and passing over said sprockets and extending upward within a support to a second pair of sprockets mounted on a frame-work, a member bridging between said spaced chains carrying a bearing member, a flexible member connected with said bearing member and passing over a roller member substantially to align the depending end of said flexible member with the pump rods of a well and said flexible member connected to said pump rods, means for supporting the inner end of said upper sprocket framework from a point above the frame-work, said supporting means having adjustment thereon for adjustably moving the inner end of said framework to adjust the tightness of said chains.

7. In a pumping unit for pumping oil wells and the like, a gear reduction box carrying two sprockets spaced apart and in axial alignment, 2. pair of sprockets spaced above said first-mentioned sprockets and disposed on a G-shaped shaft so an unimpeded space will exist between the ends of said G-shaped shaft, said (i-shaped shaft being positioned intermediate the length of an inwardly extending frame-work, which frame-work is secured at its outer end to a selected one of the transverse members of the derrick intermediate the length of said derrick, and at its inner end supported by a connecting element of the derrick above said inwardly extending frame-work, a pair of endless chains passing over the aligned sprocket members and carrying a bar therebetween, a bearing pivotally mounted on said bar and carrying a flexible element which is adapted to pass over a roller member and depend for connection with a pump rod to be posi-- tioned in a well.

8. In combination with a derrick structure, a power unit, a gear reduction unit coupled with said power unit, a pair of sprockets projecting from said power unit in axial alignment with each other, a pair of chains spaced apart and passing over said sprockets and extending upward within said derrick to a second pair of sprockets mounted on a framework intermediate the length of the derrick, means for supporting a portion of said frame-work on said derrick at a point above said frame-work, a member bridging between said spaced chains and carrying a bearing member, a flexible member connected with said bearing member and passing over a roller member positioned on top of the derrick to operate a pump rod, a counterweight mounted on said derrick structure and suspended by a flexible member, said flexible member passing over a roller member positioned on top of the derrick, and having the depending end thereof adapted to be connected with the pump rod so said derrick will support said counterweight and said pump rod, independently of said pump actuating mechanism, said flexible member suspending said counterweight and said flexible member connected with said bearing member being spaeed'apa-rt so as toprevide Vertical clearance between said flexible members.

The following references are of record in the CARLOS E. CRAWFORD.

REFERENCES CITED file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name 7 Date Murphy et a1. May 12, 1914 Num e 1,1 2, 54 1,13 ,158 1,305,590

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2733826 *Aug 2, 1952Feb 7, 1956 Apparatus for elevating and delivering articles
US3515008 *Jun 3, 1968Jun 2, 1970Poenita GheorghePumping unit for bottom-hole pump drive
US4586879 *Mar 19, 1984May 6, 1986Slater Frank WWell pumping unit
US4916959 *Feb 22, 1988Apr 17, 1990Gordon R. LivelyLong stroke well pumping unit with carriage
US5309992 *Jul 3, 1991May 10, 1994Evi-Highland Pump Company, Inc.Pulley-drive lifting system
Classifications
U.S. Classification74/37, 92/137
International ClassificationF04B47/00
Cooperative ClassificationF04B47/00
European ClassificationF04B47/00