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Publication numberUS2555815 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 5, 1951
Filing dateDec 12, 1946
Priority dateDec 12, 1946
Publication numberUS 2555815 A, US 2555815A, US-A-2555815, US2555815 A, US2555815A
InventorsRawlins Herbert L, Weaver George W
Original AssigneeRawlins Herbert L, Weaver George W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Anchor for decoy ducks
US 2555815 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 5, 1951 H. L. RAWLINS ETAL 2,555,815

ANCHOR FOR DECOY DUCKS Filed Dec. 12, 1946 2 Sheets-Sheet l I u ueutar Herbert L. Rawlins George W. Weaver WWW Hi June 5, 1951- H. L.'RAWL]NS m-AL 2, 55,81

ANCHOR FOR DECOY DUCKS Filed Dec. 12, 1946 -2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Inz'eutm' l8 2 Herbert L. Rawlins 20 C m mH/H GeorgejKWeaver imam...

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Patented June 5, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ANCHOR FOR DECOY DUCKS Herbert L. Rawlins, Thomson, Ill., and George W. Weaver, Spokane, Wash.

Application December 12, 1946, Serial No. 715,746

4 Claims.

The present invention relates to new and use ful improvements in anchors designed for use in connection with decoy ducks made of wood or of other suitable material.

An important object of the invention is to provide an anchor of this character adapted to be hung on the neck of a decoy to facilitate carrying of the anchor to and from the water.

A further object of the invention is to provide an anchor embodying a plurality of laterally projectin prongs by means of which the anchor line may be Wound on the anchor to prevent the line from becoming entangled with the lines of other decoys.

An additional object of the invention is to provide an anchor of this character on which the line may be wound and from which the line automatically unwinds when the anchor is lowered in the water until it reaches the bottom, thus automatically regulating the length of the anchor line.

A still further object is to provide a device of this character of simple and practical construction, which is eficient and reliable in operation, relatively inexpensive to manufacture and otherwise well adapted for the purposes for which the same is intended.

Other objects and advantages reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view showing the anchor in anchoring position with a decoy.

Figure 2 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevational view of the decoy showing the anchor placed over the head of the decoy when not in use.

Figure 3 is a top plan View.

Figure 4 is a perspective view of one form of the anchor.

Figure 5 is a plan View of a modified anchor construction.

Figure 6 is a side elevational view thereof.

Figure '7 is a plan view of a further modification, and

Figure 8 is a sectional view taken upon the plane of the section line 8--8 of Figure 7.

Referring now to the drawings in detail and first with respect to the form of the invention illustrated in Figures 1 to 4 inclusive, the numeral 5 designates the anchor generally which is constructed of any suitable metal in the form of a ring of flat oval shape as shown at 6. Arms or blunt prongs Tproject laterally from the sides of the rin or body 6 adjacent the front and rear ends thereof, the arms at each side of the body extending in diverging relation with respect to each other. The arms I extend in the plane of the surface of the body.

An eye 8 is formed at the narrow end of the body also in the plane of the surface thereof and to which one end of an anchor line 9 is attached and the other end of the line 9 is attached to an eye or the like I0 secured to the lower portion of a decoy ll.

The opening E2 in the body 6 of the weight is of sufficient area to receive the head E3 of the decoy to mount the anchor on the neck of the decoy when the anchor is not in use, the line 9 then being wound around the arms or prongs l as shown in Figure 3 to thus secure the line against entanglement with objects or with other lines of other decoys.

When it is desired to place the decoy in a body of water the anchor 5 is removed from the head is and the decoy and anchor tossed into the water where upon the anchor will sink to the bottom and at the same time the line will unwind from the arms 1 thereof until the anchor reaches the bottom where upon further unwinding of the line ceases. Accordingly the anchor automatically pays out the line in accordance with the depth of the water in which 7 the anchor is placed.

In Figures 5 and 6 of the drawings I have illustrated a modified anchor construction and which includes the oval body l4 having the arms or prongs l5 projecting laterally from the sides thereof adjacent the narrow and wide ends of the body, the narrow end of the body also being provided with the line attaching eye It.

The upper and lower surfaces of the body 14 are formed with a plurality of lugs l! which are adapted to embed in the mud at the bottom of the body of water thereby adding as a further drag for the anchor.

Figures 7 and 8 represents a further modification in which the oval body is shown at I8 and the laterally projecting arms at 19 at the sides of the body adjacent the narrow and wide ends thereof, the narrow end of the body also being provided with the line attaching eye 20. The body l8 and arms l9- are formed with openings 2| which increases the area of the anchor that is in contact with the bottom and thus creates a drag to further prevent drifting of the decoy.

In view of the foregoing description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings it is believed that a clear understanding of the construction, operation and advantages of the device will be quite apparent to those skilled in this art. A more detailed description is accordingly deemed unnecessary.

It is to be understood, however, that even though there is herein shown and described a preferred embodiment of the invention the same is susceptible to certain changes fully comprehended by the spirit of the invention as'herein described and the scope of the appended claims.

What we claim as our invention:

1. An anchor for a decoy comprising an elongated flat body of sufiicient density and mass to constitute an anchor, said body having an enlarged central opening for mounting on the neck of a decoy, said body. having convexed ends, a pair of arms adjacent each of said convex ends, the arms of each pair extending from opposite sides of the body in relatively diverging relation with the pairs of arms also being in diverging relation to each other, each of the convex ends extending into the space between the arms of a pair of arms to define therewith a pair of anchor line receiving and retaining recesses, and means carried by one of said convex ends for securing the body to an anchor line.

2. An anchor for a decoy comprising an elongated fiat body of sufiicient density and mass to constitute an anchor, said body having an enlarged central opening for mounting on the neck of a, decoy, said body having convexed ends, a pair of arms adjacent each of said convex ends, the arms of each pair extending from opposite sides of the body in relatively diverging relation with the pairs of arms also being in diverging relation to each other, each of the convex ends extending into the space between the arms of a pair of arms to define therewith a pair of anchor line receiving and retaining recesses, said body having openings to receive the soil of the bottom of the body of water upon which it rests.

3. The combination of claim 2, wherein said openings extend through said body and are spaced from each other.

4. The combination of claim 3 wherein said body and arms are coplanar.

HERBERT L. RAWLINS. GEORGE W. WEAVER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name 7 Date 1,429,558 Bauer Sept. 19, 1922 1,493,489 Holzapfel May 13, 1924 1,565,474 Link Dec. 15, 1925 1,624,262 Linley Apr. 12, 1927 1,634,436 Polson July 5, 1927 1,792,976 Gilbert Feb. 17, 1931 1,890,269 Swanson Dec. 6, 1932 1,901,050 Voorhees Mar. 14, 1933 1,942,704 'Hubbard Jan. 9, 1934 2,023,526 Hoberg Dec. 10, 1935 2,278,594 Smith Apr. 7, 1942 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 24,502 Great Britain of 1904

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1429558 *Sep 30, 1921Sep 19, 1922Fred BauerFloating decoy
US1493489 *May 15, 1922May 13, 1924Holzapfel John AAnchor
US1565474 *Sep 14, 1925Dec 15, 1925Link Raymond SAnchor for decoys
US1624262 *Jun 1, 1923Apr 12, 1927Linley Alfred ASeparable cover for universal ball-joint cases
US1634436 *Jan 27, 1925Jul 5, 1927Polson William FLine holder
US1792976 *Dec 22, 1927Feb 17, 1931Gilbert Co A CConstruction toy
US1890269 *Apr 10, 1930Dec 6, 1932Swanson Carl EToy construction unit
US1901050 *Oct 17, 1929Mar 14, 1933Voorhees John SReeling means
US1942704 *Jan 6, 1932Jan 9, 1934Garlock Packing CoGasket
US2023526 *May 2, 1933Dec 10, 1935William HobergAnchoring means for decoys
US2278594 *Nov 6, 1940Apr 7, 1942Smith Charles ODecoy anchor
GB190424502A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2630093 *Apr 30, 1951Mar 3, 1953Toal Thomas SDecoy anchor
US2711607 *Sep 14, 1953Jun 28, 1955Watson Harold EDecoy anchor
US2730833 *Mar 19, 1953Jan 17, 1956Newell Carl WLeader holder
US2747315 *Dec 1, 1952May 29, 1956Clemas Casimer ASportsman's accessories
US3050895 *Nov 21, 1960Aug 28, 1962Bratland Gustave CAnchor for decoys
US3149433 *Dec 22, 1961Sep 22, 1964Hagen Herman LDecoy anchors
US3798820 *May 22, 1972Mar 26, 1974Dye Call IncDecoy
US5822907 *Feb 20, 1996Oct 20, 1998Lukey; CordellDecoy weight
US6357161 *Mar 6, 2000Mar 19, 2002Edward M. BestDecoy motion device
US6543176 *Oct 1, 2001Apr 8, 2003Mcghghy HughDecoy anchor system and method of use
US7257921 *Jun 7, 2006Aug 21, 2007Hellmann Paul FDuck decoy anchor
US7475509 *Oct 25, 2006Jan 13, 2009Cagle Matthew FDecoy anchor
US20070266614 *Oct 25, 2006Nov 22, 2007Cagle Matthew FDecoy anchor
US20090077856 *Dec 3, 2008Mar 26, 2009Cagle Matthew FDecoy anchor
US20110094142 *Apr 28, 2011Ayers Charles DRubber decoy anchor
Classifications
U.S. Classification43/3
International ClassificationA01M31/00, A01M31/06
Cooperative ClassificationA01M31/06
European ClassificationA01M31/06