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Publication numberUS2555844 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 5, 1951
Filing dateJun 26, 1947
Priority dateJun 26, 1947
Publication numberUS 2555844 A, US 2555844A, US-A-2555844, US2555844 A, US2555844A
InventorsRouville Edward M De
Original AssigneeUs Envelope Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carry bag
US 2555844 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 5, 1951 E. M. DE ROUVILLE CARRY BAG 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 26, 1947 June 5, 1951 E. M. DE ROUVILLE CARRY BAG 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed June 26, 1947 Patented June 5, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CARRY BAG Application June 26, 1947, Serial No. 757,111

4 Claims.

This invention relates to the class of paper bags or envelopes known as carry bags, being paper bags or envelopes of relatively large size, for the reception of bulky articles, and whose walls, at the upper edges, provide extensions of stronger material adapted to form a hand grip by which the bag may be supported and carried.

My invention resides principally in an improved construction for the closure means at the mouth of such a bag, by which to minimize the tendency of the bag material to tear or fracture, in the manipulations of the mouth portion of the bag incidental to the loading and unloading of the bag or envelope pocket.

Other and further objects and advantages of my invention will be made apparent from the following detailed description thereof, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 represents an extended view of a paper blank from which the carry bag of my invention is made, and showing also hand grip reinforcements that are adhesively attached near the ends of said blank.

Fig. 2 represents a side view of the blank disclosed in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 represents an edge view of the blank disclosed in Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 represents a fragmentary view, on an enlarged scale, showing certain scoring and slitting features of my invention.

Fig. 5 represents a view similar to Fig. 4 illustrating the reverse side of the carry bag.

Fig. 6 represents a perspective view showing the handle-forming members in their operative I bag-carrying position.

Fig. 7 represents a perspective view of the bag after the mouth thereof has been opened by an outward pull upon each of the handles.

Fig. 8 represents, on an enlarged scale, a sectional view taken substantially along line 8-8 of Fig. 1, but with the flap in its partially unfolded position.

Like reference characters refer to like parts in the different figures.

For the manufacture of my improved carry bag, I preferably employ a onepiece paper blank of the generally rectangular form shown in Fig. 1, said blank being scored transversely, as shown at l, by which to define a fold that forms the bottom of the front and rear walls 2 and 3, when the blank is folded thereon to provide the bottom of the bags pocket. The front wall 2 has narrow side flaps 4, 4, which, before being folded over on score lines 5, 5, are coated with glue for adhesion (see broken lines on wall 3) to the subsequently folded rear wall 3, thereby to close the sides of the pocket between the two walls. This pocket, closed at its bottom by the fold on the score line I, and along its sides by the adhesive overlapped seams 6, 6, is open at the top for the introduction thereto of the bags contents. At the open mouth portion of the bag, the respective front and rear walls 2 and 3 have transverse scores 1 and 8 that are in register with each other, thereby forming a double thickness closure flap for the bag, adapted to be folded over Onto the wall 3, after the bags contents have been inserted, to close the mouth portion of the bag.

Secured to the exterior of the front wall 2 is a handle-forming member 9 of pasteboard or cardboard whose means of connection may be an adhesive area H) which lies wholly inward of the transverse score line I. In other words, that portion of the member 9 which extends beyond said score line 1, is free and unsecured to the material of the wall 2, thus giving opportunity for the underlying wall material to be folded away from said member, in the act of closing the mouth or open upper end of the bag. The exterior of the wall 3 carries, at its central portion, a cooperating handle member ll of pasteboard or cardboard, whose connection to said wall is by an adhesive area l2 which is spaced inwardly from thescore line 8 by a distance in excess of the width of the double thickness closure means of the bag, thereby to permit both thicknesses of said closure means to be folded over the wall 3, in the absence of interference from the attachment to said wall of said member l2. The member 9, in its free or unsecured portion, provides a tongue l3, formed and defined by an arcuate slit [4 of the material, and for reception of the tongue, the member ll provides an aperture IS in the manner common to handle-forming members of carry bags. As shown in Fig. 6, after the double thickness closure portion has been folded down against the wall 3, the tongue 13 of the member 9 is inserted through the opening l5 and bent upward- 1y against the member I, thereby to lock the handle-forming members together and to form a smooth upper carrying edge for the fingers of the user as inserted through said opening.

Referring particularly to Fig. 7, when the hereinabove described bag is filled with bulky contents and then quickly opened by the user, by means of pulling each handle, the folded-over or flap portion l6 of the front wall 2 usually opens,

while the folded-over portion or flap ll of the back wall 3 remains closed. Although the bag may be readily filled and emptied with the flap portions 16 and I1 thus positioned, extensive research indicates that the average user wishes to open the flap I1, and in so doing, it has been found that this action will set up forces which many times rupture and even tear the flap. It has also been found that the flap IE will sometimes become ruptured or torn when the handles are pulled apart in an attempt to open the bags mouth.

In order to obviate the hereinabove noted shortcomings of this type of carry bag, the present invention contemplates the provision of means which will cause either or both of the flaps I6 and I! to hinge about a predetermined portion of the flap to the end that there is no tendency for the flap to rupture or tear as forces are applied thereto in response to the opening of the bag. More specifically, and referring particularly to Figs. 1, 4, and 5, the back wall 3 of the bag is provided with a pair of transversely spaced and vertically disposed slits l8 and i9, each of which slits extend across the transverse score line B to provide between said slits a predetermined zone, about which the flap I! may hinge without tearing, in response to forces which tend to unfold the flap l1 away from the body portion of the wall 3. In other words, these spaced slits l8 and I9 weaken that portion of the wall material therebetween to the extent that this predetermined area or zone functions as a hinge which will permit the flap IT to be readily pulled away from the body portion of the wall 3 without rupturing or tearing the flap. Without these slits, the flap [1 will tend to remain in a flat position against the wall 3, and when forces are applied to the flap which would tend to lift the same away from the wall portion, it has been found that the score line 8 is insumcient, in and of itself, to provide a proper hinge joint for the flap. Thus, since the flap tends to remain against the wall in a folded over position, those forces which tend to open the flap are effective to rupture and tear the same in the absence of the spaced slits l8 and I9.

In order to make for even a better hinge than that provided by the spaced slits l8 and IS, the present invention also contemplatese the provision of one or more score lines and 2|, which scores are provided on the exterior of the wall 3 adjacent the transverse score 8 and between the slits I8 and I9. Such auxiliary score lines 20 and 2! function, in conjunction with the slits l8 and I9, to form a predetermined zone about which the flap I! will hinge in immediate response to any forces which tend to unfold the flap from its closed position. In other words, the slits l8 and I9 define between them a zone of weakened paper material which functions as a hinge to the extent that the flap I! will always pivot or roll about the transverse scores 8, 20 and 2! in immediate response to those forces which tend to lift the flap I 1. By thus providing this hinge, all tendency for the flap to tear is obviated, for once this hinge portion of the flap turns away from the body portion of the wall 3, the remainder of the flap is drawn along therewith.

It has also been found that by extending longitudinalscore lines l8 and I9 from opposite ends of the slits l8 and [9, an even more effective hinge area may be afforded. Since a user will invariably grasp the mid-portion of the flap H, in an attempt to unfold the same, it is to be understood that the score lines l8 and I 9', along with the slits I8 and I9, being disposed intermediate the end portions of this flap, will function as a hand-grasp area which will readily flex away from the wall 3, thereby to permit the unfolding of the flap about the transverse score line without the usual tearing action.

Referring particularly to Fig. 4, the arcuate score lines 20 and 2| are formed in a pattern of an ellipse, and this ellipse has its major axis coincident with the transverse score line 8. By thus forming auxiliary score lines 20 and 2| in this manner, the hinge portion of the flap will permit the remaining portion of the flap to roll I about the transverse score 8 whenever forces tend to lift the flap away from the wall 3. Fig. 8 illustrates how this rolling action is accomplished, and by referring to this particular figure, it may be understood how the score lines 8, 20, and 2| cooperate together in producing a hinge joint. It is to be further understood that the slits l8 and [9, in conjunction with the score lines I8 and I9, function to restrict the hinging action of these score lines to the center portion of the flap, as best illustrated in Figs. 4 and '7.

Referring particularly to Fig. 5, the'interior portion of the front wall 2 is also provided with a pair of arcuately shaped auxiliary scorelines 22 and 23 which are formed in the pattern of an ellipse which has its major axis disposed in coincidence with the transverse score I. Since this flap I6 is not subjected to the severe forces as are applied to the flap [1, it has been found that it is not necessary to provide this wall with the above noted slits. In other words, when the closed bag is initially opened by pulling the handles B and H apart, it will be understood that the flap [6 will normally be unfolded as a result of the opening of the bag. Furthermore, this un' folding'of the flap I6 does not normally result in the rupturing of the flap, for the reason that those forces which tend to unfold the flap are evenly distributed along the undersurface thereof. However, by providing the auxiliary score lines 22 and 23, all possibility of a rupturing of this flap is obviated.

I claim: 1 1. A carry bag of the class described, comprising front and rear walls substantially coextensive in area and forming between them an open:

, ended pocket, both of said walls near said open end being scored transversely to provide a double thickness fold of the bag material for the closure of said pocket following insertion therein of the goods to be carried, a handle-forming reinforcemerit attached exteriorly to each wall and extending upwardly beyond the transverse score line thereof, the reinforcement on said rear wall against which said closure fold is folded being attached to said wall in spaced relation to said score line, thereby to leave room below said line for the folding down of said closure means, and the said rear walls material being scored and slit at a pair of locations spaced along said transverse score line, said scores and slits bein disposed substantially at right angles to said transverse score line to provide between said locations a predetermined zone about which said material may hinge without tearing, in response to forces which tend to unfold the folded over portion of said rear wall material.

A carry bag of the class'described, comprising front and rear walls substantially coexten-, sive in area and forming between them 2111 011611:

ended pocket, both of said walls near said open end being scored transversely to provide a double thickness fold of the bag material for the closure of said pocket following insertion therein of the goods to be carried, a handle-forming reinforcement attached exteriorly to each wall and extending upwardly beyond the transverse score line thereof, the reinforcement on said rear wall against which the closure fold is folded being attached to said wall in spaced relation to said score line, thereby to leave room below said line for the folding down of said closure means, the said rear walls material being provided with a pair of transversely spaced and vertically disposed slits, each slit extending across said trans verse score line, and that portion of said walls material between said slits and adjacent said transverse score being provided with a relatively short and substantially transversely disposed score which, together with said slits, forms a pre determined zone about which said material may hinge without tearing, in response to forces which tend to unfold the folded over portion of said rear wall material.

3. A carry bag of the class described, comprising front and rear walls substantially coextensive in area and forming between them an open-ended pocket, both of said walls near said open end being scored transversely to provide a double thickness fold of the bag material for the closure of said pocket following insertion therein of the goods to be carried, a handle-forming reinforcement attached exteriorly to each wall and extending upwardly beyond the transverse score line thereof, the reinforcement on said rear wall against which the closure fold is folded being attached to said wall in spaced relation to said score line, thereby to leave room below said line for the folding down of said closure means, the said rear walls material adjacent to and on opposite sides of its transverse score line being scored and slit along a pair of transversely spaced lines located substantially at right angles to said transverse score line, and that portion of said walls material between said spaced lines and adjacent said transverse score being provided with a pair of relatively short and substantially transversely disposed scores which, together with said spaced lines of scores and slits, forms a predetermined zone about which said material may hinge without tearing in. response to forces which tend to unfold the folded over portion of said rear wall material.

4. A carry bag of the class described, comprising front and rear walls substantially coextensive in area and forming between them an open-ended pocket, both of said walls near said open end being scored transversely to provide a double thickness fold of the bag material for the closure of said pocket following insertion therein of the goods to be carried, a handle-forming reinforcement attached exteriorly to each wall and extending upwardly beyond the transverse score line thereof, the reinforcement on said rear wall against which the closure fold is folded being attached to said wall in spaced relation to said score line, thereby to leave room below said line for the folding down of said closure means, the said rear walls material adjacent to and on opposite sides of its transverse score line being scored slit along a pair of transversely spaced lines located substantially at right angles to said transverse score line, and that portion of said walls material between said spaced lines being scored in a substantially elliptical shaped pattern, the major axis of the ellipse being coextensive with said transverse score to provide, together with said spaced lines of slits and scores, a predetermined zone about which said material may hinge without tearing in response to forces which tend to unfold the folded over portion of said rear wall material.

EDWARD M. DE ROUVILLE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATEN TS Number Name Date 1,675,011 Wolf June 26, 1928 2,067,367 Willetts et a1 Jan. 12, 1937 2,182,261 Maas Dec. 5 1939 2,234,180 Lackey et a1 Mar. 11 1941 2,362,990 Crane Nov. 21, 1944 2,463,302 Orchard Mar. 1, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1675011 *Jan 2, 1924Jun 26, 1928Albert WolfEnvelope
US2067367 *Mar 28, 1935Jan 12, 1937Frederick Willetts GeorgeCarrier bag
US2182261 *May 19, 1938Dec 5, 1939Julian MaasContainer
US2234180 *Feb 2, 1937Mar 11, 1941LackeyCarrying device
US2362990 *Aug 24, 1940Nov 21, 1944Morris Paper MillsBottle holder
US2463302 *May 21, 1945Mar 1, 1949Orchard Paper CompanySatchel bag having reinforced side walls and handle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2935181 *Oct 21, 1957May 3, 1960Vineberg Joseph HPackaging device
US6257484 *Oct 18, 1999Jul 10, 2001Technology Container CorporationCollapsible corrugated plastic box having tear-resistant hand holds
US7419300 *Jun 16, 2004Sep 2, 2008S.C. Johnson Home Storage, Inc.Pouch having fold-up handles
EP0669260A1 *Dec 9, 1994Aug 30, 1995Bischof und Klein GmbH & Co.Packaging means made of flexible material in the form of sacks or bags
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/6, 383/88, 383/903, 229/117.13
International ClassificationB65D33/24
Cooperative ClassificationB65D33/243, Y10S383/903
European ClassificationB65D33/24B