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Publication numberUS2555900 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 5, 1951
Filing dateApr 29, 1948
Priority dateApr 29, 1948
Publication numberUS 2555900 A, US 2555900A, US-A-2555900, US2555900 A, US2555900A
InventorsRoberts Samuel S
Original AssigneeDavid B Oliver
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Footwear safety guard
US 2555900 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 5, 1951 s. s. ROBERTS 2,555,900

FOOTWEAR SAFETY GUARD Filed April 29, 1948 2 Sheets-Sheet l [now afar: fiq/wua 5 8055/9731 4 June 5, 1951 s. s. ROBERTS 2,555,900

FOOTWEAR SAFETY GUARD Filed April 29, 1948 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 40 Inventor: 541M011 3". P0552791 Patented June 5, 1951 UNITED FOOTWEAR SAFETY GUARD Samuel S. Roberts, Pittsburgh, Pa., assignor of one-half to David B. Oliver, Pittsburgh, Pa.

Application April 29, 1948, Serial No. 23,956

12 Claims.

' in conjunction with safety shoes.

To obtain the full cooperation of the worker in using footwear safety devices, it is necessary that the device be flexible so that the worker can perform any operation, such as stooping or climbing, without discomfort or interference. To fully protect the wearer of the device, the device must be made so as to protect the wearer regardless of the position of his foot. The guard should protect the toes, vamp, instep, metatarsal joint, the ankle and tibia leg bone of the worker. It is also necessary that the device be light in weight so as not to interfere with the movement of the workman.

The cost of production and upkeep of the attachment is also an important consideration from the managements viewpoint.

An attachment meeting many of the above requirements is disclosed in my prior Patent Reissue No. 22,614, dated March 6, 1945. However, the weight of that attachment is such that complete cooperation of the workman has not been secured in all cases and the cost of production is somewhat greater than that desired.

It is therefore an object of my invention to provide an extremely light flexible footwear safety attachment capable of withstanding the shock of impacts regardless of the position of the foot.

Another object is to provide such an attachment that can be easily applied to a shoe of any size.

Still another object is to provide such an attachment that is inexpensive to make and easy to repair.

These and other objects will be more apparent after referring to the following description and attached drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a top plan view of the safety attachment fastened on a shoe;

Figure 2 is a sectional view taken on the line .II'II of Figure 1;

Figure '3 is a sectional view taken on the line vIIIIII of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a sectional view taken on the line IVIV ofFigure 2;

Figure 5 is a top plan View of the buckle used with the fastening strap;

Figure 6 is a side view of Figure 5.

Figure '7 is a sectional view taken on the line VII-VII of Figure '6;

Figure 8 is a sectional view taken on the line Y-IIL-VIII of Figure 7; and

Figure 9 is a sectional view taken on the .line IX-IX of Figure 2.

Referring more particularly .to the drawings, the reference numeral 2 indicates ashoe to which the safety attachment of the present invention is to be applied. The various parts of the attachment are preferably die stamped from any suitable material such as WOOd, steel, plastic or aluminum. The attachment has a toe cap 4 with a toe tip guard 5 riveted or otherwise fastened thereto. Integral with the guard 6 is a ledge 8 which is adapted to extend under the shoes foresole to provide front anchorage for the attachment. A compression spring H3 is fastened beneath the top surface of the toe cap at the rear end thereof and extends almost to the front end of the attachment.

Pivotally mounted on the toe cap 4, by means of pivot boits I2, is the main cover I4 which is preferably provided with reinforcing ribs I6. The bolts i2 pass through washers l8 located between the toe cap 4 and main cover 14. A curved cross bar 26 made of spring steel is fastened to the bottom sides of the cover i4 and prevents spreading thereof as well as providing bottom anchorage for the guard assembly.

Anopening 22 is provided in each side of the main cover Id at the rear end thereof just above the cross bar 20. A slot 24 extends from the opening 22 upwardly and rearwardly to the end of the cover I4 as best shown in Figure 2. An endless belt 26 made of any suitable material such as fabric, leather or rubber is adapted to slip through the slots 24 into the openings 22. To prevent excessive wear on the belt 26 a U- shaped metal guard 28 is provided in each opening 22. To provide for adjustment, a buckle 30 shown in Figures 5 to 8 is provided for the belt 26. The buckle 3b is provided with three openings 32, 34 and i6. Mounted on the buckle over each of the openings 32 and 36 is a slidable clamping member 38 having its sides bent downwardly around the buckle to form the female slides t9. A serrated portion 52 on the member 38 forms one side of an opening 44. As shown in Figure 1, the doubled belt passes through the openings 32 and 36 from the same side of the buckle and through the opening 44 in each member as and then through the central openin 34 to form a p 46. The serrated portions 42 clamp the belt in adjusted position. By loosening the members 38 the belt 26 can be pulled through the buckle openings to make the size of the loop larger or smaller so as to adjust the overall length of the belt 26. A strap support '41 is provided on each member 38. The Supports 4'! are open at their upper end to permit the strap in the loop 46 to slip thereover when the loop is large, this occurring when the attachment is applied to a small shoe.

A forked compression spring 48 is riveted under the top surface of the-cover IA. The forks of the spring are arranged with one on each side of the longitudinal centerline of the attachment. Each fork consists of a top leaf 5i] and bottom leaf 52 with the free ends of the leaves extending inwardly and rearwardly toward the longitudinal centerline of the attachment. When fastened to the shoe 2, the spring 48 exerts pressure on both sides of the instep, holdin the attachment in central position on the shoe and biasing the cover upwardly to the position shown in Figure 2.

If desired an auxiliary cover 54 may be fastened to the top surface of the cover it by means of a hinge 56 which is so constructed that the cover 54 can be removed. The cover 54 overlaps the cover l4 and to limit the forward movement of the cover 54 the lower end of each side thereof is slotted at 58 and a portion 65 is punched'inwardly to form a lug. Each side of the cover 14 has a notch 62 cut into the edge thereof so maintain constant tension on the auxiliary cover a 54 to return it to the normal position shown in full lines in Figure 2.

The guard is applied to the shoe 2 by pulling 1s backover the shoe until the foresole of the shoe rests on the ledge 8. The strap 2'5 is then pulled up around the back of the shoe as shown in Figures 1 and 2. In this position the normal functioning of the parts are as follows. The toe cap 6 and strap 2% limit the longitudinal movement of the guard. The spring Hl holds the toe cap14 in its upper position with clearance between the toe cap 4 and shoe. The amount of upward movement of the toe cap is limited by r the ledge 8. The spring 43 centers the guard on the shoe and also holds the main cover H1 in its upper position with clearance between the cover I4 and shoe 2. The spring leaves and 52 are spaced apart and the upward pressure is normally exerted by one leaf only so that the pressure is not so great as to be a bother to the workman. Upward movement of the cover Id is limited by the cross bar 29. When a shock load strikes the toe cap ll, the spring it is compressed and the bottom of the toe cap l will strike the ground and thereby protect the workmans foot. When a shock load strikes the cover M, the leaves 5%} and 52 are forced together and thus provide a greater resistance to compression.. When the spring leaves are both compressed, the bottom of the cover it and the cross bar 20 will strike the ground and thereby protect the foot. The two springs If! and 48 act to cushion any blow striking the attachment.

The auxiliary cover 54 is used to protect the upper instep and tibia leg bone and is normally in the position shown in full lines in Figure 2. When the workman stoops he contacts the top r-f the cover as and moves it outwardly to a position beyond the vertical as shown in broken lines in Figure 2, and thus is'affected only by horizontally directed blows. In normal position, contact of cover 54 with the workman under shock loads is prevented by the overlapped por- 4 tion thereof seating against the turned up portion of cover [4 and the lugs 60 bearing against the stops 62 on cover M.

In removing the attachment the strap 26 is pulled downwardly over the heel of the shoe and those parts of the strap in openings 22 will slide down to the bottom of the openings, thus giving clearance for removal of the foot from the attachment. The strap will remain in this position when placing the attachment over. the shoe so as to avoid interference to the movement of the shoe into the attachment.

While one embodiment of my invention has been shown and described it will be apparent that other adaptations and modifications may be made without departing from the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

l. A footwear safety guard comprising a toe cap, a spring fastened underneath the top of said toe cap and adapted to normally urge the toe cap upwardly, a ledge at the forward end of said toe cap adapted to fit under the sole of said footwear, a main cover pivotally mounted on said toe cap, a spring fastened underneath the top of said cover and adapted to normally urge the cover upwardly, a cross bar connecting the lower ends of said cover, and means for limiting the longitudinal movement of said guard on said footwear.

2. A footwear safety guard comprising a toe cap, a spring fastened underneath the top of said toe cap and adapted to normally urge the toe cap upwardly, means on said toe cap for limiting the upward movement thereof, a main cover pivotally mounted on said toe cap, a compression spring fastened underneath the top of said cover and adapted to normally urge the cover upwardly, said compression spring having an arm on each side of the longitudinal centerline of the guard, means on said cover for limiting the upward movement thereof, and means for limiting the longitudinal movement of said guard on said footwear.

3. A footwear safety guard comprising'a toe cap,'a spring fastened underneath the top of said toe cap and adapted to normally urge the toe cap upwardly, a ledge at the forward end of said toe cap adapted to fit under the sole of said footwear, a main cover pivotally mounted on said toe cap, a compression spring fastened underneath the top of said cover and adapted to normally urge the cover upwardly, said compression spring having an arm on each side of the longitudinal 'centerline of the'guard, a cross bar connecting the lower ends of saidcover, and means for limiting the longitudinal movement of said guard on said footwear.

4. A footwear safety guard comprising a toe cap, a spring fastened underneath the top of said toe cap and adapted to normally urge the toe cap upwardly, means on said toe cap for limiting the upward movement thereof, a main cover pivotally mounted on said toe cap, a compression spring fastened underneath the top of said cover and adapted to normally urge the cover upwardly, means on said cover for limiting the upward movement thereof, an auxiliary cover pivoted to the upperpart of said main cover and having a part on each side thereof engaging the sides of the main cover, and means for limiting the longitudinal movement of said guard on said footwear.

5. A footwear safety guard comprising a toe cap, a spring fastened underneath the top of-said toe cap and adapted to normally urge the toe cap upwardly, a ledge at the forward end of said toe cap adapted to fit under the sole of said footwear, a main cover pivotally mounted on said toe cap, a compression spring fastened underneath the top of said cover and adapted to normally urge the cover upwardly, a cross bar connecting the lower ends of said cover, an auxiliary cover pivoted to the upper part of said main cover and having a lug on each side thereof engaging the sides of the main cover, and means for limiting the longitudinal movement of said guard on said footwear.

6. A footwear safety guard comprising a toe cap, a spring fastened underneath the top of said toe cap and adapted to normally urge the toe cap upwardly, means on said toe cap for limiting the upward movement thereof, a main cover pivctally mounted on said too cap, a compression spring fastened underneath the top of said cover and adapted to normally urge the cover upwardly, said compression spring having an arm on each side of the longitudinal centerline of the guard, a cross bar connecting the lower ends of said cover, an auxiliary cover pivoted to the upper part of said main cover and having a part on each i side thereof engaging the sides of the main cover, and means for limiting the longitudinal movement of said guard on said footwear.

7. A footwear safety guard comprising a toe cap, a spring fastened underneath the top of said toe cap and adapted to normally urge the toe cap upwardly, a ledge at the forward end of said toe cap adapted to fit under the sole of said footwear, a main cover pivotally mounted on said toe cap, a compression spring fastened underneath the top of said cover and adapted to normally urge the cover upwardly, said compression spring having an arm on each side of the longitudinal centerline of the guard, a cross bar connecting the lower ends of said cover, an auxiliary cover pivoted to the upper part of said main cover and having a part on each Side thereof engaging the sides of the main cover, and means for limiting the longitudinal movement of said guard on said foot- Wear.

8. A footwear safety guard comprising a toe cap, a spring fastened underneath the top of said toe cap and adapted to normally urge the toe cap upwardly, a main cover .pivotally mounted on said toe cap, said main cover having an opening in each side of the rear end thereof and a slot extending upwardly and rearwardly from each opening to the end of the cover, an endless belt adapted to pass through both of said slots into said openings, a compression spring fastened underneath the top of said cover and adapted to normally urge the cover upwardly, said last named spring having two forks one on each side of the longitudinal centerline of the guard, each fork having normally spaced apart top and bottom leaves, a cross bar connecting the lower ends of said cover, and means for limiting the longitudinal movement of said guard on said foot- Wear.

9. A footwear safety guard comprising a toe cap, a spring fastened underneath the top of said toe cap and adapted to normally urge the toe cap upwardly, a main cover pivotally mounted on said toe cap, a compression spring fastened underneath the top of said cover and adapted to normally urge the cover upwardly, said main cover having an opening in each side at the rear end thereof and a slot extending upwardl; and rear wardly from each opening to the end of the cover, and an endless belt adapted to pass through both of said slots into said openings.

1i). A footwear safety guard comprising a toe cap, a spring fastened underneath the top of said toe cap and adapted to normally urge the toe cap upwardly, means on said toe cap for limiting the upward movement thereof, a main cover pivot ally mounted on said toe cap, a compression spring fastened underneath the top of said cover and adapted to normally urge the cover up wardly, means on said cover for limiting the upward movement thereof, said main cover having an opening in each side at the rear end thereof and a slot extending upwardly and rearwardly from each opening to the end of the cover, and an endless belt adapted to pass through both of said slots into said openings.

11. A footwear safety guard comprising a toe cap, a spring fastened underneath the top of said toe cap and adapted to normally urge the toe cap upwardly, means on said toe cap for limiting the upward movement thereof, a main cover pivotally mounted on said toe cap, a compression spring fastened underneath the top of said cover and adapted to normally urge the cover upwardly, means on said cover for limiting the upward movement thereof, an. auxiliary cover pivoted to the upper part of said main cover and having a lug on each side thereof engaging the sides of the main cover, a spring biasing the auxiliary cover against said lugs, and means for limiting the 1ongitudinal movement of said guard on said footwear.

12. A footwear safety guard comprising a toe cap, a spring fastened underneath the top of said toe cap and adapted to normally urge the toe cap upwardly, a main cover pivotally mounted on said toe cap, a compression spring fastened underneath the top of said cover and adapted to normally urge the cover upwardly, said last named spring having normally spaced apart top and bottom leaves, and means for limiting the longitudinal movement of said guard on said footwear.

SAMUEL S. ROBERTS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date Re. 22,614 Roberts Mar. 6, 1945 1,742,763 Gerard Jan. 7., 1930 2,046,217 Strauss June 30, 1936 2,392,867 Stoner et al Jan. 15, 1946

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1742763 *Aug 9, 1928Jan 7, 1930Gerard Frank ADevice for foot protection
US2046217 *Aug 20, 1935Jun 30, 1936Strauss Albert AFoot guard
US2392867 *Aug 11, 1944Jan 15, 1946Stoner Nancy FSafety protector for shoes
USRE22614 *Apr 1, 1943Mar 6, 1945 Footwear safety device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2842872 *Dec 7, 1956Jul 15, 1958Endicott Johnson CorpSafety shoe
US3040455 *Jul 20, 1961Jun 26, 1962Criswell Charles JFoot guard
US3082553 *Oct 23, 1961Mar 26, 1963Textron IncSafety shoes
US3102347 *Oct 11, 1961Sep 3, 1963Banister William KSafety shoe and instep guard therefor
US3175310 *Mar 20, 1964Mar 30, 1965Int Shoe CoWebbed instep protector
US3175311 *Mar 20, 1964Mar 30, 1965Int Shoe CoProtective work shoe
US3206874 *Apr 16, 1965Sep 21, 1965Endicott Johnson CorpSafety shoe having an improved guard flap
US4231170 *Feb 2, 1979Nov 4, 1980Griswold Frank BInstep protector for safety shoes
US5711092 *Jun 7, 1995Jan 27, 1998Despres; Richard L.Jointed bendable foot protector for use with a shoe
US6539647Mar 13, 2001Apr 1, 2003Frank P. DiazSafety shoe
US7127836Nov 15, 2004Oct 31, 2006Jamison John RShoe and boot protecting assembly
US20120011740 *Jul 17, 2010Jan 19, 2012Michael KannRainproof shoe cover pair capable of being rapidly put on and taken off
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/72.00R
International ClassificationA43C13/14, A43C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43C13/14
European ClassificationA43C13/14