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Publication numberUS2556026 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 5, 1951
Filing dateOct 19, 1949
Priority dateOct 19, 1949
Publication numberUS 2556026 A, US 2556026A, US-A-2556026, US2556026 A, US2556026A
InventorsCarlisle Byron A
Original AssigneeCarlisle Byron A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotatable directive antenna
US 2556026 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 5, 1951 s. A. CARLISLE ROTATABLE DIRECTIVE ANTENNA 2 Shjeets-She et 1 Filed Oct. 19, 1949 INVENTOR. BYRON A. CARLISLE BY FIGURE 2.

June' 5, 1951 B. A. CARLISLE ROTATABLE DIRECTIVE ANTENNA 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed 001;) 19, 1949 FIGURE 3.

FIGURE 4.

FIGURE 5.

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Patented June 5, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT O'FFMIE ROTATABLE DIRECTIVE ANTENNA Byron A. Carli sle, Shawnee, Kans. Application October 19, 1949, Serial No. 122,250

12 Claims.

This invention relates to an improvement in directive antennas and more particularly to cir cumventing obstacles for scanning, receiving and broadcasting electrical waves.

Heretofore it has been necessary to provide antennas on various sides of a broadcasting tower to face different directions without interference from the tower members, or a revolving type antenna had to be mounted on top of a tower and was limited to this location.

It is desirable in many installations, especially tall towers, to have the antenna mounted on the side of the broadcasting tower in a selected position that may be only half way up the tower,

therefore, it is obvious that a single antenna must face all directions and avoid the interference of the tower members in broadcasting or receiving electrical waves.

An object of the .improved invention is to mount an elongated member on the side of a tower whether the tower be round or square, triangular or of many sides such as hexagon, octagon and ,etc., provide an antenna near the free end of the elongated member and have suitable automatic means to turn the antenna more degrees on its fulcrum than the elongated member turns in degrees on its fulcrum.

With the above object in view the invention will be better understood by the description that follows and the accompanying drawings of which:

Figure 1 is a view in cross section of a tower illustrated with the improved elongated or horizontal member fulcrumed'on :the tower and having its free end supporting a revolvable reflector type antenna taken on line I-! of Figure 3.

Figure 2 is a view of a longitudinal section of the elongated or horizontal member taken on line .2-2 of Figure 3, illustrating the sheaves and cable control for revolving the antenna.

Figure 3 is a view of an elevation of the iming .the elongated or horizontal member in a horizontal sweeping position.

Figure 5 is a fragmentary View taken on line 5-5 of Figure 3 illustrating .the limit switch controls for reversing the movementof the elongated or horizontal member.

Figure 6 ma diagrammatic view illustrating the wiring of the motor drive, to the horizontal arm, with reversible "limit switches and a manual three pole fswitch connected in the electrical The elongated or horizontal member 1 is preferably made in the form of a case or housing having enclosed walls 8 and screw cover 9 held to the housing by screws H1. The screw cover 9 has a boss ll near the sweeping end of the horizontal member I and supports the frame member l2, electric motor 13, gears l4 and i5 and reflector antenna 44 mounted on its control housing Hi. It is obvious that common and well known transmission wires may be connected to the motor I3 and rotate the gears l4 and [5 to elevate or lower the angle of inclination of the reflector antenna 44. A shaft ll extending from frame l2 passes through the boss I I into the case I and 8 to support a sheave [8. This sheave i8 is secured on the shaft l1 near the free end IQ of the case 1 with walls 8 and is provided with an endless cable passing over the sheave l8 and being anchored at 2|. The endless cable 20 is crossed at 22 and extends over the sheave 23, anchored at 24, the anchors being any well known clamp means to prevent the cable from shifting on the sheave 23. The sheave 23 is fixedly secured to the stationary tube 25 by set screw 26, the tube 25 having a base 2.! secured to the tower frame member 28. The tube 25 extends upward into a mast tube 29 and forms a fulcrum or journal for the mast tube 29 to rotate thereon. The top of the mast tube 29 is fulcrumed at 30 on the plate 3| of the tower 32 and has a bearing collar 33 pinned thereto by pin 34. A brace 35 is used with heavy equipment as illustrated and extends from the mast tube 29 to the screw cover plate 9 for additional support.

A shaft 36 extends from the coupling 31 through tower frame member 28, tube 25, mast tube 29 and is relatively fixed with mast tube 29 by means of the collar 33 and pin 34.

The coupling 31 is also connected to the shaft 38 which is driven by gears 39 and 40 and pinions 4! and 42. The pinion 42 is mounted on the electric motor 43 and the gears are journalled in the casing 45 all of which constitutes a common and well known motor gear reduction drive. The motor gear reduction housing 45 is mounted on the longitudinal member 45 of the tower 32 and limit switch arms 41 and 48 are clamped or mounted on the mast tube 29. The limit switch arms 41 and 48 have adjustable actuating screws 49 and 5D to operate common and Well known type of limit switches 5i and 52 respectively.

In Figure 6 the diagrammatically illustrated motor 43 has three phase wires extending therefrom, wires 53 and 54 extend to limit reversing 3 switch 5! and wire 55 extends to a three pole switch 56. Wires 5'! and 53 extend to the limit and reversing switch 52 and wires 59 and 6G complete the three phase .circuit to the three pole throw switch 56.

In the operation it will be apparent from the foregoing description that when current is passed through the three phase circuit the motor 53 will revolve and drive the gears in the housing 45 to shaft 36. The shaft 38 passes through base 21 of stationary tube 25 and through pivoted mast tube 29, driving the collar 33 through the pin 34 thus moving the brace 35 and mast tube 29 in a rotative direction. The arm I will fulcrum on fixed tube 25 and have its free end 19 sweep from one side of the tower to the opposite side of the tower or as illustrated 180 degrees. The limit switch arms 4'! and 48 will turn with the mast tube 29 and either the actuating screw 49 or 56 Will strike their respective limit switches 5| and 52 causing a reversing action of the motor and reversing movement of the arm E as disclosed by the wiring in Figure 6.

The sheave 23 is anchored on the fixed tube 25 and has the flexible cable anchored at 24. When the arm 1 with its case B and free end it sweeps in an arc the sheave 18 will be turned by the cable 20 and anchorage 2|. When the free end is is on one side of the tower the reflector antenna 44 faces one direction and as the arm sweeps to the opposite side of the tower the reflector antenna M5 is rotated on the shaft I-I through 360 degrees. Using a square tower the reflector antenna M faces the same direction as it did on the opposite side of the tower.

It is obvious from the illustrated drawings and description that the reflector antenna may be revolved as the horizontal member i sweeps from side to side of the tower in what is known as continuous scamiing or the reflector antenna may be stopped in any position between the limit of the movement thereof by throwing out the a three pole switch 56.

The reflector type antenna is also fixed on shaft 6| to rotate therewith by means of the gears l4 and i5 and motor [3 to move the reflector antenna 4 1 upward in a selective angular plane or downward in a selective angular plane. The wiring controls and minute details are not illustrated because of the well known art thereof.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. A directive antenna comprising, a revolvable antenna, a'longitudinal member, said revolvable antenna being supported near the free end of said longitudinal member, the opposite end of said longitudinal member being fulcrumed' on a stationary member, a drive member being connected to said longitudinal member to move the free end of said longitudinal member in an arc, and control members extending from said stationary member to said revolvable antenna to cause it to rotate more degrees or" movement about its axis than the degrees of movement said longitudinal member rotates about its axis.

2. A directive antenna comprising a fulcrumed antenna reflector, an elongated member supporting said fulcrumed antenna reflector, said elongated member being fulcrumed on a stationary member, a drive member being connected to said elongated member to move it in an arc, and connecting members extending from the fulcrum of said' elongated member to said fulcrumed'antenna reflector to cause said fulcrumed antenna reflector to rotate more degrees of move- 4 ment with respect to its axis than the degrees of movement of said elongated member with respect to its axis.

3. A directive antenna comprising, a revolvable antenna, a control member supporting said revolvable antenna, a horizontal member, said control member being supported by the free end of said horizontal member, the opposite end of said horizontal member being rotatably pivoted on a stationary shaft, said stationary shaft having supporting means, a revolvable member being connected to said horizontal member to move the free end of said horizontal member in an arc, and control members extending from the pivot of said horizontal member to said first mentioned control member to cause said antenna to rotate twice as many degrees of movement with respect to its axis than the degrees of movement of said horizontal member with respect to its axis.

4. A directive antenna comprising, a revolvable antenna, a horizontal member, said revolvable antenna being supported near'the free end of said horizontal member, the opposite end of said horizontal member being fulcrumed on a stationary member, a drive member being connected to said horizontal member to move the free end of said horizontal member in an arc, control members at each end of said are to cause said drive member on said horizontal member to reverse the movement thereof, and control members extending from said stationary member to said revolvable antenna to cause it to rotate more degrees of movement than the degrees of movement of said horizontal member each about their respective axes.

5. A directive antenna comprising, a revolvable antenna reflector, a horizontal member, said revolvable antenna reflector being supported near the free end of said horizontal member, the opposite end of said horizontal member being rotatably pivoted on a stationary member,a drive member being connected to saidhorizontal member to move the free end of said horizontal member in an arc, control members at each end of said are co-operating with said horizontal member to reverse the movement thereof, and control members extending from said pivot to said revolvable antenna reflector to cause said reflector to rotate more degrees of movement with respect to its axis than the degrees or" movement of said horizontal member with respect to its axis. 6. A directive antenna comprising, a revolvable antenna, a control member supporting said revolvable antenna, a horizontal member, said control member mounted near the free end of said horizontal member, the opposite end of said horizontal member being rotatably pivoted on a stationary shaft, saidstationary shaft havin supporting means, a revolvable member being connected to said horizontal member to move the free end of said horizontal member in an arc, and control members extending from said pivot to said first mentioned control member to cause said antenna to rotate more degrees of movement with respect to its axis than the degrees of movement of said horizontal member with respect to its axis.

'7. A directive antenna comprising, a fulcrumed concave reflector, a control member supporting said concave reflector in. a selective angular plane with respect to a horizontal plane, a horizontal member, said control member supported by the free end of said horizontal member, the opposite end of said horizontal member being rotatably pivoted on a stationary vertical shaft, said vertical shaft having supporting means, a revolvable member being connected to said horizontal member to move the free end of said horizontal member in an arc, and control members extending from the pivot of said horizontal member to said first mentioned control member to cause said concave reflector to rotate in a greater are with respect to its fulcrum than the arc of said horizontal member rotates on its fulcrum.

8.'A directive antenna comprising, a fulcrumed concave reflector, a control member supporting said concave reflector in a selective angular plane with respect to a horizontal plane, an elongated member, said control member attached to the free end of said elongated memher, the opposite end of said elongated member being rotatably pivoted on a stationary vertical shaft, said vertical shaft having supporting means, a revolvable member being connected to said elongated member to move the free end of said elongated member in an arc, limit control members at each end of said arc to cause said elongated member to reverse the movement thereof, and control members extending from the pivot of said elongated member to said first mentioned control member to cause said concave reflector to rotate in a greater are with respect to its fulcrum than the arc of said elongated member rotates on its fulcrum.

9. A directive antenna comprising, a fol-- crumed concave reflector, a control member supporting said concave reflector in a selective angular plane with respect to a horizontal plane,

a horizontal member, said control member being 35 supported near the free end of said horizontal member, the opposite end of said horizontal member being rotatably pivoted on a stationary member, a revolvable member being connected to said horizontal member to move the free end of said horizontal member in an arc, limit control members at each end of said are to cause said horizontal member to reverse the movement thereof, and control members extending from the horizontal member fulcrum to said first mentioned control member to cause said concave reflector to rotate in a greater are with respect to its fulcrum than the arc of said horizontal member rotates on its fulcrum.

10. A directive antenna comprising, a revolv: l

able antenna, an elongated member, said revolvable antenna attached to the free end of said elongated member, the opposite end of said elongated member being fulcrumed on a stationary shaft, said stationary shaft having a supporting means, a member being connected to said elongated member to move the free end of said elongated member in an arc, limit control members at each end of said are to cause said revolvable member on said elongated member to reverse the movement thereof, and control members extending from said stationary shaft to said revolvable antenna to cause it to rotate more degrees of movement than the degrees of movement of said elongated member each about their respective axes.

11. A directive antenna comprising, a revolvable antenna, an elongated member, said revolvable antenna attached to the free end of said elongated member, the opposite end of said elongated member being rotatably pivoted on a stationary shaft, said stationary shaft having supporting means, a revolvable member being connected to said elongated member to move the free end of said elongated member in an arc, limit control members at each end of said are to cause said elongated member to reverse the movement thereof, and control members extending from said pivot to said revolvable antenna to cause said antenna to rotate more degrees of movement with respect to its axis than the degrees of movement of said elongated memher with respect to its axis.

12. A directive antenna comprising, a revolvable antenna, a control member supporting said revolvable antenna, a horizontal member, said control member supported near the free end of said horizontal member, the opposite end of said horizontal member being rotatably pivoted on a stationary shaft, said stationary shaft having supporting means, a revolvable member being connected to said horizontal member to move the free end of said horizontal member in an arc, limit control members at each end of said are to cause said revolvable member on said horizontal member to reverse the movement thereof, and control members extending from said pivot to said first mentioned control member to cause said antenna to rotate more degrees of movement with respect to its axis than the degrees of movement of said horizontal member with respect to its axis.

BYRON A. CARLISLE.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3952984 *Feb 12, 1973Apr 27, 1976Dracos Alexander DimitryMid-tower rotary antenna mount
US3987452 *Dec 9, 1975Oct 19, 1976International Telephone And Telegraph CorporationTracking antenna mount with complete hemispherical coverage
US4014026 *Nov 25, 1975Mar 22, 1977Westinghouse Electric CorporationPower operated antenna assembly
US4379297 *Jan 6, 1981Apr 5, 1983Thomson-CsfOrientable antenna support
US5320315 *Feb 27, 1992Jun 14, 1994Kabushiki Kaisha ShinkawaMicroscope supporting mechanism
US5364049 *Jul 15, 1992Nov 15, 1994Radar EngineersVehicular mounting system for directional antennas
Classifications
U.S. Classification343/765, 248/218.4
International ClassificationH01Q3/08, H01Q3/02, H01Q3/04
Cooperative ClassificationH01Q3/04, H01Q3/08
European ClassificationH01Q3/08, H01Q3/04