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Publication numberUS2556777 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 12, 1951
Filing dateFeb 11, 1949
Priority dateFeb 11, 1949
Publication numberUS 2556777 A, US 2556777A, US-A-2556777, US2556777 A, US2556777A
InventorsReimuller Christian J
Original AssigneeReimuller Christian J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Thermostatically controlled valve for shower heads
US 2556777 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 12, 1951 C. J. REIMULLER THERMOSTATICALLY CONTROLLED VALVE FOR SHOWER HEADS Filed Feb. 11, 1949 g 9 uTmillllm 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 IN VEN TOR.

June 12, 1951 c. J. REIMULLER 2,556,777

THERMOSTATICALLY CONTROLLED VALVE FOR SHOWER HEADS 2 $heets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 11. 1949 INVENTOR.

Patented June 12, 1951 UNITED TES gram QFFICE THERMOSTATICALLY CONTROLLED VALVE FOR- SHOWER HEADS Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in shower heads, and more specifically to the safety shower head described in my co-pending application Serial #59393, now abandoned, and to certain mechanical refinements particularly adaptable to said shower head being a first object.

This improvement, in the broad sense, consists in a more adaptive valve and port arrangement desirable in the original structure cited herebefore.

A method has been conceived and revealed in my co-pending application wherein the volumetric flow of fluids from a shower head arrangement as revealed is dependent upon:

(1) the amount of heat available in the fluid contained therein,

(2) its effect upon the thermostatic element enclosed and part of the internal mechanism of the shower head, and,

. (3) the size and number of by-pass channels, that are part of the valve face.

The present improvement and invention pertains to an innovation and unique method to reduce the cost of manufacture by making the valve in'such manner that said valve serves in its normal function of shutting off the fluid flow, and while being shut will also provide by-pass flow so necessary to the normal operation of such safety shower head described hereinafter.

Other objects enumerated in number in my co-pending application hereinbefore cited are also satisfied by this form of embodiment.

Further objects and advantages of this invention will be apparent from the following description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, wherein a preferred form of the present invention is clearly shown, and in which like or similar reference characters refer to like or similar parts throughout the several views.

Figure l is a transverse cross-sectional view of a shower head equipped with the automatic thermostatic volume reducing means.

Figure 2 is a cross section taken at line 22 of Figure 1, showing a mounting journal.

Figure 3 is a plan view of the valve face showing the notches or grooves that allow the valve to leak or pass a proportionately smaller volume of fluid when it is seated on a suitable seat- Figure 4 is an enlarged cross section showing the manner in which the'grooved valve is seated on a valve seat.

Figure 5 is an enlarged perspective view of the valve and a portion of the upper assembly.

Figure 6 is a fragmentary view taken at 6-6 2 of Figure 1 showing the eccentric used to raise the valve.

Figure '7 is a transverse cross-sectional of the coupling like housing containing the automatic thermostatic volume reducing means, and shows another or alternative form of valve and valve seat.

Figure 8 is a fragmentary, partial, cross-sec! tional view of the lower portion of Figure 7, and rotated degrees.

Figure 9 is a top plan view of the radially corrugated valve taken at line 9'9 of Figure 7.

Figure 10 is a perspective view of the valve and piston as would be assembled to the thermostatic element.

Now referring to Figure 1, number I represents a hydraulic type thermostatic element, held by cotter retainer 2 which resists spring I. Movable piston 3 carries integrally a valve 4 and a stem 5. Compression spring 6 lifts valve 4 from its seat 8. Said valve is constructed with a serrated face, the serrations being 9. Eccentric ill on shaft I I raises the valve 4 when hand set arm I2, held by screw I 3 is rotated. Spray plate I4 is screwed into shower body 15, and collar [6 connects the swivel ball I! to the shower body. Port I8 is for fluid entry.

In Figure '7, number la represents the positive displacement hydraulic type thermostat which is held by cotter retainer 20. which resists spring 1a. Movable piston 3a carries a valve 4a and a stem 5a. Compression spring 6a lifts valve 4a off of seat 8a, and should have suflicient force in either construction to do so when operating under normal pressures. Valve 4a is constructed with a radially corrugated face, the serrations being numbered 9a. Raiser cam 20 is mounted on shaft 2| which is in turn drilled internally at 2 la to allow for passage of trapped air and fluids from journal 2lb. Included is a return spring 22, a reset handle 23 and a packing collar 24 screwed into the body 25 which has two ports; number l8b is for incoming fluids and number l8a is for outgoing fluids, although it is perfectly permissible to reverse the direction of flow and expect good operational results.

Assume that fluid is allowed to enter port I8 of Figure 1. The fluid next enters and passes through the restrictor swivel IT, into the valve body I5 where it surrounds the thermostatic element I and then passes through the serrated valve 4 and through the valve seat port 8. Traversing still farther, the fluid passes through the perforated plate l4 where it is converted into. a spray.

Should the temperature of the incoming fluid exceed a safe maximum temperature, then the safety feature is brought into operation, thus, the thermostatic element expanding causes valve 4 to be forced shut against seat 3, which upon closing shuts off the primary flow of overheated fluid. In order to bring about the release of said valve 4, the fluid surrounding the thermostatic element I must be displaced by cooler fluids resulting from the readjustment of the mixer valves. To accomplish this displacement, a valve with a serrated or leaky face is used as shown. (Figure 1, number 4.)

After the overly hot water has been displaced and has left the housing, and when the heat relief is sufficient to cause the thermostatic element to release, return spring 6 assists inraising the valve 4 thereby restoring normal flow to proceed through the device in the normal manner and rate.

Cam l0, rotated by shaft II and handle 12 is used to manually restore full flow through the shower head, should a bather wish to take a very hot bath, or to restore full flow without waiting the few moments required for the thermostatic element l to react and release valve 4. However, if the valve 4 is manually raised by cam l0, then the override spring 1 must be compressed. The override spring I will remain more or less compressed until the thermostatic element cools and retracts the piston 3.

Figure 7 represents a mechanism similar to Figure 1, except the mechanism is shown enclosed in a coupling like body or housing 25 similar to an ordinary pipe coupling. In this form,, it can be installed directly in the fluid supply line ahead of the shower head, or in any hot fluid line where it can be used to control fluid flow.

In Figure '7, like numbers represent like parts, the function of which is the same as already described hereinabove. The main reason for Figures '7 to 10 is to show another manner of constructing valve 4, and seat 8 to allow for the necessary by-passing action required in a shower head assembly to which it is attached. Thus, number la is the thermostatic unit held by cotter retainer 2a resisting spring'la, etc.

Valve 4a is radially corrugated and of simple design as to make it a cheap punch press part. It is understood, of course, that the number and depth of the serrations or corrugations will vary the volume of by-pass flow.

Cam 2!? held on shaft 2| is another form of re,- set means, excepting that once the reset button 23 is pressed in, thereby raising the valve do by compressing spring la, the cam is caught and held by stem 5a. seating in groove 26 in which position cam 26 is held until the force delivered through stem 5a has ceased andsaidstem is retracted a small amount thereby allowing return spring 22 to drive the whole assembly of cam 2!] and shaft 2| etc. back to its normal position. Attention is directed to the drilled hole Zla extending through shaft 21 and which is used to exit trapped fluids or air in the cylindrical section forming a bearing Zlb. The same efiect could be had by drilling a hole through the b ody from the interior into the journal 211), or a keywa'y could be cut in the end of shaft 2| of like length as the drilling shown.

Other minor changes could bearranged, such as using a perforated disc in place of the corrugated one used as the valve 4a; consequently, it is intended that all matter contained in this description and in the accompanying drawings be considered as illustrative of the theory reduced to actual application and use, and not in a strictly limiting sense.

What I claim is:

l. A heat reactive fluid volume controlling means comprising a suitable body housing containing a positive displacement type thermostatic element, said thermostatic element comprising a solid heat reactive core in a rigid case having a cylindrical extension containing a piston, said piston being a stem integral with a corrugated disc valve, the. assembly being capable of linear movement within said cylindrical extension, a flat valveseat, an override-holding spring, a valve raising spring and a self-returning latching cam means to engage. with said piston, and suitable inlet and outlet ports.

2. A heat reactive fluid volume controlling means comprising a suitable body housing containing a positive displacement type thermostatic element, said thermostatic element operative with a piston and serrated disc valve against a plain valve seat, an override-holding spring, avalvc raising spring, suitable inlet and outlet porting means, and a self-returning latching cam means operative with said pistonand serrated valve for restoring normal flow.

3. A heat reactive valving means comprising a suitable body housing and spray creating means containing a positive displacement type thermostatic element, said thermostatic element operative with a piston and serrated disc valve against a plain valve seat, an override-holding spring, a valve raising spring, suitable inlet porting means, and a self-returning latching cam means operative with said piston and serrated valve for restoring normalfiow.

4. A heat reactive valving means comprising a suitable body housing and spray creating means containing a positive displacement type thermostatic element, said thermostatic element comprising a heat reactive core in a rigid case having a cylindrical extension containing a piston, said piston being a stem integral with a corrugated disc valve, the assembly being capable of linear movement within said cylindrical extension, a flat valve seat, an override-holding spring, a valve raising spring, suitable inlet porting means, and a self returning latching cam means operative with said piston and corrugated valve for restoring normal flow.

5. A heat reactive valving. means comprising a body housing and spray creating means containing a positive displacement type thermostatic element, said thermostatic element operative with a piston and corrugated disc valve against a flat valve seat, an override-holding spring, a valve raising spring, suitable restricted inlet porting means, and a self-returning latching cam means operative with said piston and corrugated valve for restoring normal flow. 7

CHRISTIAN J. REIMULLER.

REFERENCES CITED The followingv referencesare of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 773,541 Bunting Nov. 1, 1904 1,303,140 Yeiser May 6, 1919 1,847,911 Trane Mar. 1, 1932 2,010,455 Herzbrun et a1 Aug. 6, 1935 2,439,336 Dillman- Apr. 6, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US773541 *Oct 12, 1903Nov 1, 1904William Bunting JrShower-bath apparatus.
US1303140 *Oct 15, 1917May 6, 1919 Thermostat shower-head
US1847911 *Sep 19, 1930Mar 1, 1932Trane Reuben NThermostatically controlled valve
US2010455 *Dec 26, 1933Aug 6, 1935Isadore HerzbrunSafety shower bath spray head
US2439336 *Apr 20, 1945Apr 6, 1948Detroit Lubricator CoThermostatic valve
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3219272 *Dec 23, 1963Nov 23, 1965Acf Ind IncThermostatic valve
US3224675 *Jul 29, 1957Dec 21, 1965Fox Elton BMeans for protecting the heater in a circulating liquid system
US3338518 *Apr 14, 1965Aug 29, 1967Jackes Evans Mfg CompanyPilot operated valve
US5024378 *Nov 26, 1990Jun 18, 1991American Standard Inc.Shut-off valve for scald prevention
US5123593 *Jan 23, 1990Jun 23, 1992Rundle Gregory EManual override heat sensitive valve
US5560541 *Apr 28, 1995Oct 1, 1996I.W. Industries, Inc.Anti-scald valve for bathroom showers
US5676309 *Dec 6, 1994Oct 14, 1997The Lee CompanyThermally responsive flow control valve
US5803354 *Jun 17, 1996Sep 8, 1998Benedict; Charles E.Temperature responsive fluid flow controllers
US7617989 *Apr 25, 2006Nov 17, 2009Caleffi S.P.A.Automatically reclosable thermostatic control device for valves
US7681804Jun 15, 2005Mar 23, 2010Showerstart, LlcMethods and apparatus for an automatic temperature-controlled valve
US7878417Apr 23, 2007Feb 1, 2011Showerstart, LlcMultifunctional restrictive valve
US8434693Dec 13, 2010May 7, 2013Showerstart LlcMultifunctional restrictive valve
US20060157575 *Jun 15, 2005Jul 20, 2006John LockhartMethods and apparatus for an automatic temperature-controlled valve
US20060237549 *Apr 25, 2006Oct 26, 2006Marco CaleffiAutomatically reclosable thermostatic control device for valves
US20070194141 *Apr 23, 2007Aug 23, 2007Showerstart, LlcMultifunctional restrictive valve
US20110079296 *Dec 13, 2010Apr 7, 2011Michael Brownmultifunctional restrictive valve
EP2058567A1 *Jan 17, 2006May 13, 2009John LockhartTemperature-controlled valve
WO1996034325A1 *Apr 25, 1996Oct 31, 1996I.W. Industries, Inc.Anti-scald valve for bathroom showers
WO2006076732A1 *Jan 17, 2006Jul 20, 2006John LockhartTemperature-controlled valve
WO2007127189A3 *Apr 23, 2007Dec 18, 2008Showerstart LlcA multifunctional restrictive valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification236/93.00R, 236/93.00B, 236/100
International ClassificationB05B12/10, B05B12/08
Cooperative ClassificationB05B12/10
European ClassificationB05B12/10