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Publication numberUS2557348 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 19, 1951
Filing dateApr 8, 1946
Priority dateApr 8, 1946
Publication numberUS 2557348 A, US 2557348A, US-A-2557348, US2557348 A, US2557348A
InventorsLloyd Hornbostel
Original AssigneeDorothy Rogers Hornbostel
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Color spinner toy
US 2557348 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 19, 1951- p. ORNBOSTEL 2,557,348

COLOR\ SPINNER TOY Filed April 8, 1946 .EJVE'HZUF LL 0 Y0 HOD/V805 TEL.

Patented June 19, 1951 001.03. SPINNER TOY Lloyd Hornbostel, Beloit, Wis., assignor to Dorothy Rogers Hornbostel, Beloit, Wis.

Application April 8, 1946, Serial No. 660,575

2 Claims. 1

This invention relates to a toy or amusement device including a rotating disk adapted to receive water colors from a paint brush touched thereon to produce pleasing and amusin rings of color. Specifically, the invention deals with a toy having an electric motor driven disk in a protecting pan for receiving colors to produce eye appealing effects whereby the pan prevents splattering of colors on adjacent objects.

The toy of this invention includes a mounting base carrying an electric motor. The motor in turn has a casing supporting the bottom of a pan. This pan is provided with an upstanding peripheral wall. The shaft of the motor projects through the base of the pan and carries a disk supporting member in the pan. A disk is horizontally mounted on the supporting member :around a threaded spindle portion and a nut is threaded on the spindle against the disk to affix the disk on the supporting member for co-rotation with the shaft. The disk has a top surface receptive to colors such as water colors or the like. The disk is thereby replaceably attached to the shaft in the pan and carried at a level above the bottom of the pan and beneath the top of the wall of the pan. The disk can be composed of disposable material such as heavy paper or cardboard, or can be made of more permanent washable material such as plastic. The motor drives the disk at speeds around 1700 R. P. M. and touching a paint brush containin water colors against the rotating disk will immediately produce a ring of color on the disk. If the disk is touched on three or four radially spaced points with a paint brush containing different water colors, three or four rings of these colors will be produced and if the disk is then touched near its center with plain water or dilute water color, a wash effect will be obtained by the action of centrifugal force in spinning the more fluid water or dilute color outwardly over the previously applied rings toward the periphery of the disk. Amusing and pleasing rainbow color effects are obtained.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention the motor is mounted on the base through the media of a U-shaped bracket and the motor shaft extends beneath the motor casing into the open an amusement device or toy enabling a child or unskilled operator-to obtain eye appealing color effects on a rotating member.

A further object of the invention is to provide a toy spinner device for receiving colors to produce eye appealing color combinations and ef-- fects.

A still further object of the invention is t provide a color spinner toy including an electric motor driven disk for receiving water colors thereon to produce pleasing color efiects.

A specific object .of the invention is to provide a color spinner toy having an electric motor driven replaceable disk in a protecting pan and adapted to receive water colors and the like thereon for producing rainbow color effects without splatterin the operator or adjoining objects.

Other and further objects of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art by the following detailed description of the annexed sheet of drawings which, by way of preferred example, illustrates one embodiment of the invention. 7

On the drawings:

Figure 1 is a top plan view of the color spinner toy of this invention.

Figure 2 is a side elevational view with parts.

broken away to show underlying parts of the color spinner toy.

Figure 3 is .a plan view of a replaceable disk for the toy of this invention.

As shown on the drawings:

A color spinner toy in shown in Figs. 1 and 2 includes a mounting base II having a U-shaped bracket [2 secured to the axial center, of the top face thereof. Thus the bracket l2 has a bottom horizontal leg l2a receiving a bolt [3 therethrough to attach the bracket to the base. The bracket has a vertical upstanding web l2b and a top leg I2c overlying the leg [2a in spaced relation. An electric motor casing [4 has a flat bottom face Ma resting on the top leg I20 of the bracket I2 and secured thereto by means of screws I 5. The motor casing has a flat top wall Mb receiving the base 5a of a pan l6 thereon. Screws ll secure the pan I6 to the motor casin M. The pan l6 has an upstanding peripheral wall [6b therearound and this wall is preferably of cylindrical configuration.

The motor in the casing has an armature driven shaft l8 projecting beyond both end faces Ma and Mb of the casing. The lower end of the shaft extends through the leg I20 of the bracket into the space between the legs of the bracket and a knurled knob 19 is secured thereon 3 in this space. A set screw is provided on the knob 19 to lock the knob to the shaft.

The top end of the shaft I8 projects through the base l6a of the pan l6 and receives a support member 2| thereon. The support member is affixed to the shaft by means of a set screw 22. The support member has a top face 2la positioned at a level above the base I6a of the pan but beneath the top of the wall [6b of the pan. A threaded spindle portion 23, which can be integral with the shaft I8, projects above this supporting face 2la of the support member and is coaxial with the shaft IS.

A disk 24 composed of self-supporting paper or cardboard, plastic or the like, has a central aperture 24a therethrough adapted to receive the spindle 23 therein. The disk 24 is bottomed on the support surface 2la of the support member 2| and a knurled nut 25 is threaded on the spindle 23 to thrust against the disk 24 for clamping disk between the nut and surface Ziuof the support member 2| for co-rotation with the shaft I8. The disk is thereby held at a level in the pan it above the base Ilia thereof but below the top of the peripheral wall l6b. The disk is readily replaced by removal of the nut 25 from the spindle 23.

In mounting a disk 24 for co-rotation with the shaft in the pan [6 or in removing a disk 24 from the shaft and pan the knob is on the shaft is preferably grasped to prevent rotation of the shaft so that the nut 25 can be readily rotated on and off the spindle 23.

The electric motor in the casing 14 is energized through an electric wire 26 and rotates the shaft I8 at speeds around 1700 R. P. M. At these speeds the disk 24 is subjected to sufficient force so that even a relatively limp sheet of paper will tend to maintain a single horizontal plane.

If the rotating disk 24 is touched even lightly with a water color laden paint brush such as 21, ring such as 28, 29 and 30 of color will be immediately formed on the top face of the disk. This top face of the disk is receptive to water colors and the like and is adapted to be colored thereby. For example, if diiferent'colors on the paint brush 2'! are successively applied to the disk, the rings 28, 29 and 39 will be formed in different colors, and if a wash is then applied toward the rotating center of the disk this wash will be flung outward by centrifugal force over the differently colored rings 28, 29 and 30 to provide a rainbow effect and blending of the different colors of the rings. The wash can be applied by depositing water from the brush 2! onto the disk near the rotating center thereof. Alternately, of course, the wash can be colored and sufficiently fluid to travel outwardly by centrifugal force over the top face of the 'disk. Many pleasing and amusing color effects and combinations can be obtained.

The upstanding wall it?) of the pan l6 catches any colors that are flun off of the disk and prevents splattering of adjacent objects.

From the above description it will be appreciated that I have provided a spinner toy that will easily produce eye appealing and amusing color combinations and effects without requiring any skill so that even a young child can operate and be amused with the toy.

It will, of course, be understood that various details of construction may be varied through a Wide range Without departing from the principles of this invention and it is, therefore, not the purpose to limit the patent granted hereon otherwise than necessitated by the scope of the appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. A color spinner toy comprising a base, a bracket having a bottom leg secured on top of said base, a vertical leg extending from the bottom leg and a top leg overlying the bottom leg in spaced relation therefrom, a motor casing secured on top of said top leg of the bracket, a pan secured on top of said motor casing, said pan having an upstanding peripheral wall therearound, a motor shaft projecting from said casing into said pan and into the space between the top and bottom legs of the bracket, a knob secured on said shaft in the space between said legs of the bracket, and disk attachment means secured on said shaft in said pan for releasably carrying a disk in the pan to rotate with the shaft, and said'knob in the space between the legs of the bracket being conveniently accessible for holding the shaft against rotation when replacing a disk on the shaft in the pan.

2. An amusement device for producing pleasing color effects which comprises a base, a bracket having a bottom leg secured on top of said base, a vertical leg extending from the bottom leg and a top leg overlying the bottom leg in spaced relation therefrom, a motor casing secured to the top leg of the bracket, a pan secured on top of said motor casing, said pan having an upstanding peripheral wall therearound, a motor shaft projecting from said casing into said pan, disk attaching means secured on said shaft in said pan for releasably carrying a disk in the pan to rotate with the shaft, and means for holding the shaft against rotation while replacing a disk on the shaft in the pan, the upper surface of said disk being exposed for the selective application of colors from a brush or the like thereto.

LLOYD HORNBOSTEL.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 442,628 Kristen Dec. 16, 1890 693,317 Wells Feb. 11, 1902 755,349 Bornman Mar. 22, 1904 952,913 Law Mar. 22, 1910 1,022,956 Lengerke et al Apr. 9, 1912 1,714,994 Turner May 28, 1929 2,167,589 Schutz s July 25, 1939 2,515,359 Steiner July 18, I950 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 18,966 Great Britain 1900

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US442628 *Aug 6, 1890Dec 16, 1890 Josef kristen
US693317 *Apr 4, 1901Feb 11, 1902George WellsAutomatic chromatrope.
US755349 *Oct 30, 1903Mar 22, 1904Henry L BornmanPaint-dipping machine.
US952913 *Aug 16, 1909Mar 22, 1910Samuel H Law SrTop.
US1022956 *Jan 14, 1911Apr 9, 1912Justus Von B LengerkeMulticoloring apparatus.
US1714994 *Apr 13, 1928May 28, 1929Burke Golf CompanyGolf-ball painting and partial-drying machine
US2167589 *Nov 6, 1936Jul 25, 1939Libbey Glass CompanyMethod of banding articles
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GB190018966A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3280792 *Jun 13, 1963Oct 25, 1966John Grupp SrApparatus for and method of splash painting
US3323491 *Dec 17, 1964Jun 6, 1967Granick Stewart EColor spinner toy
US3453991 *Feb 14, 1968Jul 8, 1969Rainbow Crafts IncApparatus for forming artistic patterns
US4893583 *Mar 31, 1989Jan 16, 1990Artwave America, Inc.Stretcher means for use in a spin art machine
US5672057 *Sep 20, 1996Sep 30, 1997Engel; Robert W.Spin art device having inflatable components
US6843701Jun 26, 2003Jan 18, 2005Michael ArnoneDesign making toy
US8308483 *Jul 28, 2009Nov 13, 2012Hume Christopher ARotatable drawing device
US20100028838 *Jul 28, 2009Feb 4, 2010Chris A HumeRotatable Drawing Device
US20100285430 *May 7, 2010Nov 11, 2010David Jerry MacfadyenApparatus, systems, and methods for applying spin-art to fabric
US20110195382 *Feb 1, 2011Aug 11, 2011Elliot RudellTransferable spin art toy
EP0726171A2 *Feb 9, 1996Aug 14, 1996Hasbro, Inc.Apparatus and method for rapidly rotating containers to produce multi-aspect designs
WO2008144064A1 *May 21, 2008Nov 27, 2008Bender JudithChildren's copying machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification118/506, 446/243, 118/500, 118/52
International ClassificationA63H1/00, A63H1/22, A63H33/22
Cooperative ClassificationA63H1/22, A63H33/22
European ClassificationA63H33/22, A63H1/22