Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2557401 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 19, 1951
Filing dateJan 10, 1945
Priority dateJan 10, 1945
Publication numberUS 2557401 A, US 2557401A, US-A-2557401, US2557401 A, US2557401A
InventorsAgins George, Richard Y Miner
Original AssigneeArma Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Remote control apparatus
US 2557401 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 19, 1951 G. AGINSETAL REMOTE CONTROL APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 10, 1945 INVENTORS I George Agim Richard Y M'ner BY M ATTORNEY June 19, 1951 G. AGINS ETAL REMOTE CONTROL APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 10, 1945 INVENTORS George Agina Richard K Miner M @474; ATTORNEY G. AGINS ET AL REMQTE CONTROL APPARATUS June l9, 1951 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Jan. 10, 1945 IN VEN TORS George Agim chard Y. Miner ATTORNEY Patented June 19, 1951 2,557,401 REMOTE CONTROL APPARATUS George Agins, Brooklyn, and Richard Y. Miner,

New York, N. Y., assignors to Anna Corporation, Brooklyn, N.- Y., a corporation of New York Application January 10, 1945, Serial No. 572,178

This invention relates to attack against a moving enemy from a base by means of a rayguided missile.

An object is to provide a method of control whereby a missile is guided toward collision with an enemy craft all during the time after it has left the launching station until it explodes near the enemy craft.

Another object is to provide a self-steering submarine torpedo which shall travel in predetermined relation to rays emitted from a target, till detonation occurs.

Our invention is particularly concerned with a missile or projectile capable of changing its own course after launching which no ordinary projectile can do, it being well understood that if a target changes course or speed after an ordinary projectile, aimed to hit it has left its gun, a miss i sure to be registered.

The plan is to "illuminate the target, preferably by means of a radar transmitter, then to launch the missile or torpedo and guide it by rays reflected back from the target. Our new guided projectile or missile is launched into the air (or water), picks up these rays and guiding itself upon them, chooses a course which will bring it closer and closer to the target. In this way a target will be hit, no matter what evasive tactics it employs.

We are well aware that to guide a missile to a target along rays therefrom has been proposed, but such methods cause the missile, to be launched in the general direction of the target, and then propose to have it swing around a curve and chase the target until it is hit. Or the missile is kept in the line of sight to the target by rays reaching it directly from the tracking radar. In this connection we have found, that, for straight flight these methods are fairly feasible, but if a target undertakes evasive action, the rapid turns necessary to the missile, cause centrifugal forces within it of magnitudes too great for practical design. Our calculations have shown such forces to reach a maximum of even 100 G, under extreme conditions.

However, in the methods which we propose, no very great centrifugal forces are encountered, since the projectile travels, once it has oriented itself after launching, for the most part-fairly straight so long as the target flies straight, and does not change speed. Our novel missile, shortly after launching, chooses, preferably, a collision course to the target while it ray-guided control faces in a different direction, that is,

towards the target. The preferred method, car

15 Claims. (01. 244,-14)

ried out automatically by the apparatus of our invention, it will be seen, is the method which could be used by a swimmer bearing a hand grenade in an attack on a moving boat, for in-' stance. Such a swimmer, accordin to our new method, would launch himself into the watertowards the then position of the boat, keep his eyes on the same while swinging his body around towards parallelism with its motion and at the same time pivotin his head on his body in opposite sense to the swinging of his body in order to keep in View the boat. Eventually, the swimmer having more speed than the boat, the head, with eyes fixed on the target, would crease to turn further on the body and the body cease to change course because the swimmer, by so maneuvering, would have gotten his body on collision course to the boat, meetin it after an interval determined by the excess of speed the swimmer has over the boat, as is well understood.

For a more complete understanding of the invention, reference may be had to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a schematic diagram illustrating the general mode of operation of the missile guiding apparatus of this invention, prior to flight of the missile;

Fig. 2 is a similar diagram, illustrating conditions during flight of the missile toward the target;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the guided missile of this invention, certain portions being shown exposed with the casing broken away in the interest of clarity;

Fig. 3a illustrates a modified form of the gyro scope control system of Fig. 3;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the missile of this invention, including the housing which is incompletely shown in Fig. 3;

Fig, 5 is a perspective view of a wing-borne modification of the missile of this invention, the housing being broken away to show the interior construction; and

Fig. 6 illustrates diagrammatically an electromechanical induction resolver utilized for introducing corrections into the steering mechanism of the missile shown in Fig. 5.

Referring to Fig. 1 of the drawings, numerallfl designates a conventional radar or other ray transmitter, which keeps track of, and projects waves against, a moving target, for instance an:

airplane as illustrated at ll. Of the whole bundle of rays emitted by the transmitter [0,

the emitted ray I2 is shown as reflecting back. from the target along the line I 3 and intothe dish or collector I4 and there concentrated upon the ray-receiving antenna mounted therein. This dish is universally mounted upon the missile body I5. The whole assembly is shown, ready for launching on the catapult I6 which is about to launch it in the general direction of the predicted impact or collision point I! for the target direction shown. The dish I4 is, of course, lined up with the ray I3 and forms an angle D with the intended flight path I8 of the missile I which carries it. This angle D may be called deflection and it is obviously also relative bearing of target measured from the nose of the missile. If the angle D is the correct angle of travel for the missile I5 to hit the target II at the point I1, then the line I8 is the collision course for that target. For such a course, it is well-known, that the target bearing angle D remains constant so long as the target 'maintains its speed and direction and the missile does likewise. In other words, when the target has travelled to the point I9, in its path, the missile Will have travelled to the point 20, the then line of (future) guiding rays Ill-20 will be parallel to the line of present guidin rays I3 andv the then (future) target bearing angle, DI, will be equal to D, the present target bearing angle, or launching deflection angle. Thus our novel ray-guided missile may be launched with appropriate deflection angle to the radar rays reflected from a target and travel to collision with the target by keeping this angle constant.

Now, we realize, that such a launching procedure is in common use in firing an ordinary projectile at a moving target, but with such a projectile there is no guidance for the missile after it leaves the gun, whereas our novel missile is guided during the whol time of its travel. Furthermore, in gun fire, should a target change course or speed after the angle D was calculated, the target would not be hit, whereas our novel projectile will hit in spite of any evasive action of the target.

For instance, referring again to Fig. 1, should the target II, at the point l9 start to veer as shown in the drawing our novel missile, by the peculiar action of the apparatus, to be described, would change course accordingly and select a new deflection angle D2, then a second new angle D3 and then maintain the latter constant because the target has ceased to veer and pursues another straight path 2|, as shown.

Although this plan is perfectly feasible, there is, however, a better plan preferred by us, at the present time. Some time is necessarily required to calculate the angle D and in modern warfare time is at a premium. For this reason we have invented our preferred system which obviates this difficulty quite completely. Our method permits the missile to be launched directly at the target, if desired, and allowed to find its own deflection or relative target bearing angle D, and the appropriate collision course. This action occurs, as hereinafter described in detail, because of the articulation of the ray-sensitive dish I4 upon the missile body I5 and the crossconnected servo-mechanisms shown in the figures.

How this is accomplished we have illustrated in the diagram of Fig. 2, to which reference is now taken.

In this illustration the missile I5 is shown in flight in correct orientation to hit the target II at the point I! and the target has flown from the point 22 at which the missile was discharged from the catapult I6, which is shown as still aiming at that point. The missile has steered itself around the curve 23 to the position in which it is shown and is now being guided towards collision with the target by the reflected ray I3 from the radar transmitter ID received into the dish I4. By using this method, without calculating deflection, the missile may be discharged at the target and, if its speed at first is not up to maximum or changes in flight no harm will be done, whereas, in the method of Fig. 1 a value of speed has to be assumed both for target and missile in order to calculate the angle D.

In both the methods described above, guidance of the missile on collision course to the target is obtained by keeping the angle of relative target bearing D, as nearly constant as possible. To say this is to define again the phrase collision course which is understood in navigation to be that course of one ship toward another moving ship characterized by the fact that theangle, between the bow of the first-mentioned ship and a line of sight to the moving ship, remains constant. The angle D is kept constant by the missile changing course to keep the dish.

Referring now to Fig. 3 we will-describe, in I detail, the mechanism, which we at present prefer, to accomplish our novel results. Here the missile is again designated I5 (but has parts broken away to show interior mechanism) and the ray-receiving dish Id. The dish is universally mounted at the front of the device and the propelling and steering rocket is shown at 24. A

weight 25 attached to the underside of the mis-- sile acts as a guide in launching in cooperation with the slot in the catapult I6, and also to keep the missile upright in its flight. Explosive may be carried in the compartment 26. 1

In Fig. 3 the dish at [4 has shown, within it,-

in dotted lines, the antennae 2'1, 28. The anten-' na 21 is provided to detect deviation of the received rays laterally and the antenna 28 is provided to detect deviation of the received rays vertically. The antenna indicated in the drawings'at 21 and 28, being no part of our invention,

may be of any type of device known to be sensi-' tive to the angle of impingement of rays upon the reflector-dish I4 and may conveniently be of' the type shown in the United States patent to Henri Moueix, Serial No. 2,176,469 patented October 17, 1939. In this case the transmitted rays from our transmitter shown at l0, Figs. 1 and 2, would be duplex, as described by the inventor, with difierentiating modifications, and in both the vertical and the horizontal. The dish or reflector I4 containing the antennae is universally mounted as shown, having one axis disposed for lateral alignment of the dish and another axis for vertical alignment of the same as shown, the dish I4 being fixedly mounted on the element or bail 29, which is pivoted top and bottom in the ring or bail 30. This ball is itself A refinement of this plan which we have.

Cardan, Hookes or universal joint is provided for the dish l4 with its antennae 21, 28. Upon the thus universally mounted dish-carrying element '29 are carried also two rate gyroscopes, that shown at 32 being provided for lateral rate and that shown at 33 for vertical rate. In order that these controlling gyroscopes may control the dish I4 follow-up motors are provided, that at 34 being provided for lateral control and that at 35 for vertical control. The gyroscope 32 is provided with a magnet 3-6 which cooperates with the follow-up coil 31 mounted on the element 29 to control the motor 34 (through suitable power amplifier 38 which may be like that shown in Sect. 7page 84 of Electrical Engineers Hand Book by Pender & McIlwain, v01. The vertical rate gyroscope 33 is provided with a magnet 39 which cooperates with the follow-up coil 40 to control the motor 35 (also through another similar power amplifier 4|). Any deviation of the dish [4 laterally, due to swinging of the missile in space, will cause the gyroscope 32 to process against the spring 42, actuate the follow-up coil 31 and the motor 34 to swing the element 29 in the ring, 30, and any deviation vertically, due to swinging of the missile in space, will act likewise to swing the bail 3!! in the vertical, both these corrections being relative to the missile itself. In this way the dish is caused, as will hereinafter be explained, to maintain alignment with the arriving, guiding waves.

As indicated in Fig. 3, the missile is to be driven preferably by a mechanism of the rocket type shown at 24 mounted by means of its ball portion 43, movably seated in a socket in the rear wall 44 of the missile l5, for universal rota tion therein. This rocket is intended to propel the missile and also to steer it under the influence of the received rays impinging on the antenna in the dish or reflector l4. The ball 43 has a tail or steering extension 45 within the missile [5 which is provided with a gear sector 46 to which is geared a motor 41. This motor is mounted on a bail 48 which is pivoted as shown;

in the back wall 44, concentric with the ball 43 and in a plane at right angles to the keel weight 25. A second motor 49 mounted within the missile, through the sector 50, is adapted to swing the bail 48in the vertical. By these means the rocket may be aimed in any direction relative to the missile-and thus steer it as required. When no current is fed to the motors 41 and 49 the.

centering springs 53 shown restore the rocket 24 to alignment with the axis of the missile as is well understood. Power may be supplied by multiple storage battery shown at 85. The dotted lines represent electrical connecting cables.

The operation of the device just described and shown in Fig. 3 is as follows:

The missile, with its equipment, is launched, preferably, towards the target, with the dish 14 as shown lined up with the arriving rays and the axis of the missile l5, as is also the rocket 24. The gyroscopes are spinning and the dish 14 is concentrating the rays being received from the target on to the antennae 21 and 28. The missile is speeding towards the initial position of the target, toward which it was launched, and the arriving rays entering the dish H! are beginning to deviate from the centerline of the dish in the direction of flight of the target. The antennae 2'1, '28 perceive the deviation, analyze it (after the manner of Moueix, above-mentioned, for in 6 l stance) and feed impulses, through the power amplifiers 5| and 52 (similar to the one marked 38) to the steering motors 4! and 49. This causes the missile to steer around in the direction of target flight carrying with it the dish M j by deliberate cross-connection of wiring, in the opposite direction to the target motion. This opposite swing of the dish [4 across the guiding rays, momentarily aggravates the deviation and causes the steering motors 41 and 49 to swing the missile around in direction of target flight at a rate much greater thanthe ray deviationrate. Of course, all these motions occur practically simultaneously, and the net result is that the dish l4 follows the guiding rays, and the missile steers rapidly around in direction towards collision course. called, is a course for the missile l5, such that the dish I4 is kept facing the target, with only momentary drift therefrom.) When the an-' tennae 21, 28 detect no more deviation the mis'-- sile is on collision course and dish and missile remain disposed at an angle, as is illustrated in both Figures 1 and 2. r

The previously proposed chasing types of guidedmissile are quite different from our type of guided missile in that with them, when the guiding ray swings around, the missile swings in the same direction at the same speed and the ment is only theoretical.

dish and missile are always lined up with each other.- In our type, however, the missile is no' sooner launched at the target, than the dish and missile start getting out of line, only stopping the process when collision course is found. Our missile flies along in one direction with the dish looking in another entirely different direction.

In Fig. 3, it will be understood that for the purpose of clarity, we have shown the gyro sys} tem out in the air in front of the missile body but it will be recognized that such an arrange- Actually all the mechanism is snugly housed in the body of the missile and such a practical form of our inventionv may take the shape shown in Fig. 4. This figure is, we believe, self-explanatory, like parts being like numbered, as in the other figures.

In Fig. 5 a more elaborate form of our invention is shown. The missile in this form has airfoils, rudder and elevator, wings and ailerons in order to be able to make sharper turns. The dish, antenna and its mountings are shown quite the same as in the other figures and are like numbered, but a third gyroscope is provided to stabilizethe system in the horizontal when the missile is banking. In other words, our missile here takes the form more of a robot attack plane than of a simple projectile.

Referring now to Fig. 5 the device will be described in detail.

The antenna dish [4 is mounted as before on the element 29 which, in turn, is carried by the ring 30, pivoted in the member 3|. Gyros are provided for lateral and vertical correction and all parts cooperating therewith are quite similar to those shown in Fig. 3' being also numbered likewise. The member 3|, which was, in Fig. 3, a pair of supporting struts extending from the missile'body, has-become, in Fig. 5, a fork or yoke and instead of being fixedly mounted on the missile body l5, it is here pivoted in the missile (Such a course, it will be recarried in the journals 54 and 55.- By this means the dish I4 is given a third axis of adjustment which renders it mechanically independent of the angular maneuvers of the missile body I5. The reason for this third pivot will be clear when it is realized that a missile, with wings such as this one has, must bank in order to make turns and such banking would disturb the gyros 32 and 33. But, for this very reason, another gyro and associated control must be provided to control this pivot and keep the supporting axis of the ring 30 in the fork 3! at all times substantially horizontal. This additional gyroscope is indicated at 56 in Fig. and has, as do the other gyros, a follow-up coil 51, a cooperating gyro magnet 58, a restraining spring 59 and follow-up motor 66. When banking, or other motion of the missile body, tends to force the axis of the ring out of the horizontal, the gyrofit, by the means above-described, causes the follow-up motor 66 to change the angular relation of the fork 3| to the missile body 15 to make the necessary correction. By the use of three gyroscopes and their associated apparatus in this manner the dish M tends to maintain, at all times, its orientation in space, as explained in detail in connection with the description of Fig. 3.

In the Fig. 5 under consideration, the steerable rocket shown in Fig. 3 is replaced by a fixed rocket 6|, and conventional aircraft rudder 62, elevator 63 and ailerons 64. The rudder 62 is controlled as in Fig. 3 by the follow-up motor 65 operated thru the power amplifier 65 and the elevator 63 is controlled by the follow-up motor 61 through the amplifier 68, both being primarily controlled by the antenna in the dish l lthru the cables indicated as dotted lines. The ailerons are caused to keep the plane of the wings of the missile perpendicular. to the resultant of gravity and centrifugal force, as is well understood, by means of a simple pendulum P and contacts 69 and motor 10 driven by amplifier 12. Thus, when the operation of the rudder causes the missile to turn and the pendulum P to swing, the ailerons 64 cause the device to bank properly. The banking action,. however, causes the plane of the wings to make (in rapid turns in following evasive targets) quite an angle with the plane of the controlling member, but the system supporting the dish l4 remains on even keel, due to the gyro 56, and therefore the signals from the same are reproduced on the rudder and elevator distorted by the trigonomet ric functions of the said angular displacement. In extreme cases, where the missile banks almost to the vertical, deviation of the guiding rays in the horizontal plane would be causing correction by rudder in almost a vertical plane with practical loss of control of the missile. For this reason we have provided a correcting resolver at H which we prefer, at the present time, to be an electrical resolver of the well-known synchronous motor type, such as is described in Patent No. 2,467,646, for example. This displacement or banking angle, as measured by gyroscope 56, is fed mechanically into the resolver H and the signals corrected by the necessary trigonometric functions. The resolver l I is actually a pair of resolvers made in one unit, one for elevation and the other for steering. The windings are diagrammatically shown in the small Fig. 6. In this figure, the body of the resolver is indicated by the dotted line 73, the

and I6 and theshell or stator 73 carries the; windings 16 and H. When in the position shownthe coils on the stator repeat signals to the coils on the rotor in one to one ratio corresponding to the condition when the craft is on even keel (not banked). But when the shaft 14 is rotated by the gyro follow-up motor 66 the coils of stator. and rotor are thrown out of line and the signalsproduced in the rotor are trigonometric func'-'- tions of those in the stator. The input leads 18 for the stator coil 16 are represented, in Fig. 5,; by the dotted cable 19 and the output or rotor: leads are represented in Fig. 5 by the dotted cable 6|. This completes the rudder correctionand the elevator system is as follows-stator coil leads 82 correspond to the dotted cable 83 and the rotor or output leads 84 correspond to the. dotted cable 85 in Fig. 5. The missile of Fig.6 just described is launched similarly to that of Fig. 3 and keeps its radar ray receiver dish- I4; lined up with the guiding rays while the winged missile body finds the collision course to the ray. reflecting target. But, due to its airplane type controls, this form of our invention is better adapted to attack rapidly maneuvering targets; such as dive bombers or destroyers.

While we have illustrated in Figs. 3 and-5 various forms of our invention, the forms shown have one thing in common, the fact, that in operation the initial deviation of the guiding ray causes the missile proper to swing rapidly-in the same direction, which motion causes the gyro systems to swing the dish in the opposite direc" tion on the missile. However, we have considered another method of electrical connection ofnumbered. Howeventhis form of our inventionhas the same basic feature as the other forms;- shown, that is the swinging of the ray-receptor on the missile in opposite sense to the ray devia-; tion and the missile in the same sense but fasten Although we have confinedour description ofour invention to .combat in the air, we do not.

limit ourselves to this use, but propose to con-{- trol submarine torpedoes by sound waves also Besides these we plan power attack missile boats and tanks for land use.

Of course, it will be obvious that many other forms of our invention could be developed working on the same principle, and therefore we do not wish to limit ourselves to the forms described above, but rather to have the scope of the inven-.

tion defined by the appended claims.

We claim: 1. In a ray-guided, explosive missile having a.

n duo-planar ray-receptor and a duo-planar steer-. ing mechanism, the combination therewith of gimbals for mounting said receptor, a pair of. gyroscopes severally connected to said gimbals, means restraining one of said gyroscopes to one.

degree of freedom in one plane, means restrain.-

ing the other gyroscope to one degree of freedom. in another plane, follow-up motors for said gyro-v scopes operatively comiected to the correspond: ing gimbals, and operative connections from said ray-receptor to. said steering mechanism wheref:

respective planes,

by said missile is adapted to receive guiding rays while travelling on a straight course at an angle to said rays.

- 2. In a ray-guided, explosive missile having a duo-planar ray-receptor and a duo-planar steering mechanism the combination therewith of gimbals for mountingsaid receptor, a pair of gyroscopes severally connected to said gimbals, means restraining one of said gyroscopes to one degree of freedom in one plane, means restraining the other gyroscope to one degree of freedom in another plane, follow-up motors for said gyroscopes operatively connectedto the corresponding operative connections from receptor to said gimbal motors, whereby said missile is adapted to receive guiding rays while travelling on a straight course at an angle to said rays.

3. In a ray-guided explosive vehicle adapted to be directed to a remote target, the combination of a support, steering mechanism therefor, a ray receptor, a universal joint including a gimbal mounting said receptor on said support, means responsive to deviation of the impingement angle on said receptor of rays reflected from the target, a gyroscope carried by said gimbal and having a single suspension axis for movement in one plane, means restraining the said movement of said gyroscope in said one plane, a second gyroscope carried by said gimbal and having a single suspension axis for movement in another plane, means restraining the said movement of said second gyroscope in said other plane, follow-up mechanism responsive to relative movements of said gyroscopes in the said motive means operatively connected to said gimbal for driving the same, motive means operatively connected to said steering mechanism for driving the same, and means jointly controlled'by said gyroscope follow-up mechanism and said ray-responsive means for severally energizing said motive means to maintain constant the said angle of ray impingement on said receptor.

4. In a ray-guided explosive vehicle adapted to be directed to a remote target, the combination of a support, steering mechanism therefor, a ray receptor universally mounted on said support, means responsive to deviation of the impingement angle on said receptor of rays reflected from the target, motive means energized by said responsive means, operative connections between said motive means and said steering mechanism, a gyroscope responsive to change of course of said vehicle in one plane, a second gyroscope responsive to change of course of said vehicle in another plane, follow-up mechanism severally actuated by the response of said gyroscopes, motive means energized by said follow-up mechanisms, and operative connections between said last-named motive means and said ray receptor for driving the latter to restore the impingement angle of said rays thereon.

5. In a ray-guided explosive vehicle adapted to be directed to a remote target, the combination of a support, steering, mechanism therefor,

a ray receptor universally mounted on said support, means responsive to deviation of the impingement angle on said receptor of rays reflected from the target, motive means energized by said responsive means, operative connections between said motive means and said steering mechanism, a gyroscope responsive'to change of course of said vehicle in one plane, means restraining the response of said gyroscope, a second gyroscope responsive to change of course of said vehicle in another plane, means restraining the response of said second gyroscope, follow-up mechanism severally actuated by the response of said gyroscopes, motive means energized by said follow-up mechanisms, and operative connections between said last-named motive means and said ray receptor for driving the latter to restore the impingement angle of said rays thereon.

6. In a ray-guided explosive vehicle adapted to be directed to a remote target, the combination of a support, steering mechanism therefor, a ray receptor universally mounted on said support, means responsive to deviation of the impingement angle on said receptor of rays refiected from the target, motive means energized by said responsive means, operative connections between said motive means and said steering mechanism, a gyroscope operatively connected to said receptor and responsive to change of course of said vehicle in one plane, a second gyroscope operatively connected to said receptor and responsive to change of course of said vehicle in another plane, follow-up mechanism severally actuated by the response of said gyroscopes, motive means energized by said follow-up mechanisms, and operative connections between said last-named motive means and said ray receptor for driving the latter to restore the impingement angle of said rays thereon.

7. In a ray-guided explosive vehicle adapted to be directed to a remote target, the combination of a support, steering mechanism therefor, a ray receptor, a gimbal suspension for said receptor on said support, means responsive to deviation of the impingement angle on said receptor of rays reflected from the target, motive means energized by said responsive means, operative connections between said motive means and said steering mechanism, a gyroscope carried by one of said gimbal and responsive to change of course of said vehicle in one plane, a second gyroscope carried by said gimbal and responsive to change of course of said vehicle in another plane, follow-up'mechanism severally actuated by the response of said gyroscopes, motive means energized by said follow-up mechanisms, and operative connections between said last-named motive means and said ray receptor for driving the latter to restore the impingement angle of said rays thereon.

8. In a ray-guided explosive vehicle adapted to be directed to a remote target, the combination of a support, steering mechanism therefor, a ray receptor universally mounted on said support, means responsive to deviation of the impingement angle on said receptor of rays refiected from the target, motive means energized by said responsive means, operative connections between said motive means and said receptor for driving the latter to restore the impingement angle of said rays thereon, a gyroscope respon- 'sive to movement of said receptor in one plane, a second gyroscope responsive to movement of said receptor in another plane, follow-up mechanisms severally actuated by the response of said gyroscopes, motive means energized by said follow-up mechanisms, and operative connections between said last-named motive means and said steering mechanism for changing the course of said vehicle.

9. In a ray-guided explosive vehicle adapted to be directed to a remote target, the combination of a support, steering mechanism therefor, a ray receptor universally-mounted on said support, means responsive to deviation of the impingement angle on said receptor of rays reflected from the target, motive means energized by said responsive means, operative connections between said motive means and said receptor for vdriving the latter to restore the impingement angle of said rays thereon, a gyroscope responsive to movement of said receptor in one plane, resilient means restraining the response of said gyroscope, a second gyroscope responsive to movement of said receptor in another plane, resilient means restraining the response of said second gyroscope, follow-up mechanism severally actuated by the response of said gyroscopes, motive means energized by said follow-up mechanisms, and operative connections between said last-named motive means and said steering mechanism for changing the course of said vehicle.

10. In a ray-guided explosive vehicle adapted to be directed to a remote target, the combination of a support, steering mechanism therefor, a ray receptor universally mounted on said support, means responsive to deviation of the impingement angle on said receptor of rays refiected from the target, motive means energized by said responsive means, operative connections between said motive means and said receptor for driving the latter to restore the impingement angle of said rays thereon, a gyroscope connected to said receptor and responsive to movement of said receptor in one plane, a second gyroscope connected to said receptor and responsive to movement of said receptor in another plane, follow-up mechanisms severally actuated by the response of said gyroscopes, motive means energized by said follow-up mechanisms, and operative connections between said last-named motive means and. said steering mechanism for changing the course of said vehicle.

11. In a ray-guided explosive vehicle adapted to be directed to a remote target, the combination of a support, steering mechanism therefor, a ray receptor, a gimbal suspension for said receptor on said support, means responsive to deviation of the impingement angle on said receptor of rays reflected from the target, motive means energized by said responsive means, operative connections between said motive means and said receptor for driving the latter to restore the impingement angle of said rays thereon, a gyroscope carried by one of said gimbal and responsive to movement of said receptor in one plane, a second gyroscope carried by said gimbal and responsive to movement of said receptor in another plane, follow-up mechanisms severally actuated by the response of said gyroscopes, motive means energized by said follow-up mechanisms, and operative connections between said last-named motive means and said steering mechanism for changing the course of said vehicle.

12. In a ray-guided explosive vehicle adapted to be directed to a remote target, the combination of a support, steering mechanism therefor, a ray receptor, a universal joint including a gimbal mounting said receptor on said support, means responsive to deviation of the impingement angle on said receptor of rays reflected from the target, a gyroscope carried by said gimbal and having a single suspension axis for movement in one plane, means restraining the said movement of said gyroscope in said one plane, a second gyroscope carried by said gimbal and having a single suspension axis for movement in another plane, means restraining the 12 said movement of said second gyroscope in said other plane, follow-up mechanism responsive to relative movement of said gyroscopes in the said respective planes, motive means operatively connected to said gimbal for driving the same, motive means operatively connected to said steering mechanism for driving the same, means jointly controlled by said gyroscope follow-up mechanism and said ray-responsive means for severally energizing said motive means to maintain constant the said angle of ray impingement on said receptor, and stable means on said support connected to said gimbal for stabilizing the same.

13. In a ray-guided explosive vehicle adapted to be directed to a remote target, the combination of a support, steering mechanism therefor, a ray receptor, a universal joint including, a gimbal mounting said receptor on said support, means responsive to deviation of the impingement angle on said receptor of rays reflected from the target, a gyroscope carried byv said gimbal and having a single suspension axis for movement in one plane, means restraining the said movement of said gyroscope in said one plane, a second gyroscope carried by said gimbal and having a single suspension axis for movement in another plane, means restraining the said movement of said second gyroscope in said other plane, follow-up mechanism responsive to relative movement of said gyroscopes in the said respective planes, motive means operatively connected to said gimbal for driving the same, motive means operatively connected to said steering mechanism for driving the same, means jointly controlled by said gyroscope follow-up mechanism and said ray responsive means for severally energizing said motive means to maintain constant the said angle of ray impingement on said receptor, a third gyroscope mounted on said support and responsive to unstable movements thereof, follow-up mechanism responsive to relative movement of said third gyroscope, third motive means energized thereby, and operative connections between said third motive means and said gimbal for stabilizing said receptor.

14. In a ray-guided explosive vehicle adapted to be directed to a remote target, the combination of a support, steering mechanism therefor, a ray receptor, a universal joint including a gimbal mounting said receptor on said support, means responsive to deviation of the impingement angle on said receptor of rays reflected from the target, a gyroscope carried by said gimbal and having a single suspension axis for movement in one plane, means restraining the said movement of said gyroscope in said one plane, a second gyroscope carried by said gimbal and having a single suspension axis for movement in another plane, means restraining the said movement of said second gyroscope in said other plane, follow-up mechanism responsive to relative movement of said gyroscopes in the said respective planes, motive means operatively connected to said gimbal for driving the same, motive means operatively connected to said steering mechanism for driving the same; means jointly controlled by said gyroscope follow-up mechanism and said ray-responsive means for severally energizing said motive means to maintain constant the said angle of ray impingement on said receptor, a third gyroscope mounted on said support and responsive to unstable movement thereof, a transformer having its energized stator winding fixed to said support and its rotor winding pivoted about the fore-and-aft axis, operative connections between said third gyroscope and said rotor winding for relatively rotating the same about said axis to induce a corresponding voltage therein, and electrical connections between the output of said rotor winding and the steering mechanism motive means for modifying the operation thereof in accordance with the unstable movements of said support in flight.

15. In a ray-guided explosive vehicle adapted to be directed to a remote target, the combination of a support, steering mechanism therefor, a ray receptor, a universal joint including a gimbal mounting said receptor on said support, means responsive to deviation of the impingement angle on said receptor of rays reflected from the target, a gyroscope carried by said gimbal and having a single suspension axis for movement in one plane, means restraining the said movement of said gyroscope in said one plane, a second gyroscope carried by said gimbal and having a single suspension axis for movement in another plane, means restraining the said movement of said second gyroscope in said other plane, follow-up mechanism responsive to relative movement of said gyroscopes in the said= respective planes, motive means operatively connected to said gimbal for driving the same, motive means operatively connected to said steering mechanism for driving the same, means jointly controlled by said gyroscope follow-up mechanism and said ray-responsive means for severally energizing said motive means to maintain constant the said angle of ray impingement on said receptor, a third gyroscope mounted on said support and responsive to unstable movement thereof, follow-up mechanism responsive to relative movement of said third gyroscope Number 14 about the fore-and-aft axis, a frame mounting said receptor gimbal about said axis, operative connections between said last-named follow-up mechanism and said frame for stabilizing said receptor about said axis, a transformer having its energized stator winding fixed to said support and its rotor winding pivoted about said axis, operative connections between said third gyroscope follow-up mechanism and said rotor winding for relatively rotating the same about said axis to induce a corresponding voltage therein, and electrical connections between the output of said rotor winding and the steering mechanism motive means for modifying the operation there of in accordance with the unstable movements of said support in flight.

GEORGE AGINS.

RICHARD Y. MINER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date Fanning Mar. 1, 1938 Koch July 11, 1939 Mauiex Oct. 17, 1939 Meredith 1 June 30, 1942 Crane et a1 Nov. 21, 1944 Roe et a1 May 6, 1947 Sanders, Jr. May 6, 1947 Sanders, Jr. May 6, 1947 Sanders, Jr. Jan. 20, 1948 Ayres Aug. 31, 1948 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date Great Britain July 16, 1942 Number Certificate of Correction Patent No. 2,557,401

i GEORGE AGINS ET AL.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows:

Column 9, line 14, before the Word operative insert steering mechanism, motors geared to said gimbals and;

and that the said Letters Patent should be read as corrected above, so that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Office. Signed and sealed this 4th day of September, A. D. 1951.

June 19, 1951 THOMAS F. MURPHY,

Assistant Commissioner of Patents.

Certificate of Correction Patent No. 2,557 ,401 June 19, 1951 GEORGE AGINS ET AL. It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows:

Column 9, line 14:, before the Word operative insert steering mechanism, motors geared to said gimbals and;

and that the said Letters Patent should be read as corrected above, so that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Office. Signed and sealed this 4th day of September, A. D. 1951.

THOMAS F. MURPHY,

Assistant Uommz'ssz'oner of Patents.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2109475 *Dec 24, 1935Mar 1, 1938Fanning Walter NControl system
US2165800 *Jun 22, 1937Jul 11, 1939Rca CorpDirection control device
US2176469 *Jan 16, 1937Oct 17, 1939CsfSteering device responsive to radio signals
US2288102 *Mar 1, 1940Jun 30, 1942Smith & Sons Ltd SRadio direction finding apparatus
US2363401 *Jun 18, 1938Nov 21, 1944Crane Carl JNavigational control means
US2419970 *May 29, 1943May 6, 1947Sperry Gyroscope Co IncNavigation system
US2420016 *May 23, 1944May 6, 1947Rca CorpReflected wave navigation device
US2420017 *May 23, 1944May 6, 1947Rca CorpReflected wave navigation device
US2434813 *Jul 29, 1944Jan 20, 1948Rca CorpAircraft navigation
US2448007 *Jan 8, 1943Aug 31, 1948Sperry CorpSelf-controlled projectile
GB546488A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2703399 *Feb 15, 1946Mar 1, 1955Cousy Edwin VApparatus for guiding and detonating missiles
US2704644 *Mar 4, 1949Mar 22, 1955 Yaw simulator
US2792190 *Feb 28, 1952May 14, 1957Helmut Ph G A R Von ZborowskiSystems including a steerable vehicle and a finder device mounted thereon
US2801815 *Jul 6, 1945Aug 6, 1957Cousy Edwin VRemote control system
US2826378 *Dec 15, 1950Mar 11, 1958Childs Jr John NorrisApparatus for radio control of guided missiles
US2866146 *Sep 29, 1950Dec 23, 1958Aerojet General CoAutopilot steering system
US2872131 *Feb 19, 1954Feb 3, 1959Contraves AgRocket
US2910953 *Jul 20, 1950Nov 3, 1959Karig Horace EJet driven torpedoes
US2933980 *Aug 3, 1953Apr 26, 1960North American Aviation IncIntegrated aircraft and fire control autopilot
US2964266 *Apr 1, 1952Dec 13, 1960Bendix CorpSlaving system and method
US2987269 *Jun 3, 1949Jun 6, 1961Weller RoyalMethod for radar direction of missiles
US2995830 *Jan 6, 1956Aug 15, 1961Jordan Jr Samuel ASimulated missile homing system
US3000597 *Aug 15, 1951Sep 19, 1961Bell Alfred JRocket-propelled missile
US3001186 *Aug 17, 1951Sep 19, 1961Baltzer Otto JMissile guidance system
US3012739 *Sep 8, 1950Dec 12, 1961Hull Maury IRadio controlled rocket
US3020537 *May 1, 1953Feb 6, 1962IttAutomatic tracking system
US3025024 *Dec 7, 1954Mar 13, 1962Sanders Associates IncRadar guidance control system
US3050995 *Jul 9, 1954Aug 28, 1962North American Aviation IncAutonavigator
US3072365 *Sep 16, 1957Jan 8, 1963Missile CorpPilotless craft guidance method and means
US3081048 *Oct 7, 1950Mar 12, 1963Bendix CorpDirectional antenna
US3081049 *Apr 24, 1952Mar 12, 1963Bendix CorpSlave system and method
US3081050 *Apr 27, 1954Mar 12, 1963Bendix CorpSeeker system
US3084340 *Apr 3, 1951Apr 2, 1963Emmett C BaileyObject tracking antenna and system of missile guidance
US3123822 *Mar 19, 1954Mar 3, 1964 Network
US3126172 *May 19, 1950Mar 24, 1964 Airborne vehicle remote control device
US3126473 *Sep 16, 1954Mar 24, 1964General Precision IncControl apparatus for projectile launching
US3168264 *Feb 15, 1961Feb 2, 1965Short Brothers & Harland LtdGuidance systems for missiles and other moving bodies
US3219294 *Dec 6, 1961Nov 23, 1965Siemens Ag AlbisHoming system for guided missiles
US3221694 *Oct 4, 1950Dec 7, 1965Robert S GardnerTime delay circuits for echo controlled steering gear
US3414215 *Mar 21, 1966Dec 3, 1968Martin Marietta CorpAutomatic seeker gain calibrator
US3480233 *Jul 21, 1954Nov 25, 1969Us NavyMissile guidance method and apparatus
US3677500 *Nov 10, 1952Jul 18, 1972Us NavyScanning interferometer-beam rider guidance system
US3714917 *Jul 7, 1960Feb 6, 1973Us NavyApparatus for steering a torpedo
US3733604 *Sep 11, 1957May 15, 1973Westinghouse Electric CorpAircraft guidance system
US3844506 *Feb 6, 1961Oct 29, 1974Singer CoMissile guidance system
US3902684 *Jan 15, 1974Sep 2, 1975Westinghouse Electric CorpMethod and system for airborne missile guidance
US3908933 *Jun 26, 1956Sep 30, 1975Us NavyGuided missile
US3951358 *Dec 5, 1952Apr 20, 1976Hughes Aircraft CompanyGuidance and control system for target-seeking devices
US4010467 *Mar 2, 1972Mar 1, 1977The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyMissile post-multiple-target resolution guidance
US4143835 *Aug 16, 1976Mar 13, 1979The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyMissile system using laser illuminator
US6575400 *Jul 28, 1977Jun 10, 2003Raytheon CompanyShipboard point defense system and elements therefor
US6914554 *Oct 17, 2003Jul 5, 2005The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyRadar beam steering with remote reflectors/refractors
DE1928794C1 *Jun 6, 1969May 3, 1979Dornier System GmbhAbwehrwaffe fuer ein U-Boot zur Bekaempfung von UEberwasser-,Land-oder Luftzielen
EP2051039A1 *Oct 15, 2008Apr 22, 2009LFK-Lenkflugkörpersysteme GmbHMethod and assembly for defending against ballistic missiles with the help of diverting missiles
Classifications
U.S. Classification244/3.11, 244/3.19, 114/21.3, 342/62
International ClassificationF41G7/22
Cooperative ClassificationF41G7/2206, F41G7/2266, F41G7/2286
European ClassificationF41G7/22N1, F41G7/22O2, F41G7/22B