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Publication numberUS2558648 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 26, 1951
Filing dateNov 1, 1947
Priority dateNov 1, 1947
Publication numberUS 2558648 A, US 2558648A, US-A-2558648, US2558648 A, US2558648A
InventorsGausmann Roy Warner
Original AssigneeInd Metal Protectives Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for transporting materials
US 2558648 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 26, 1951 R. w. GAUSMANN APPARATUS FOR TRANSPORTING MATERIALS 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 1, 1947 I lNVEN'i'OR ROY W. GAU SMANN ATTORNEYS June 26, 1951 R. w. GAUSMANN 2,553,548

APPARATUS FOR TRANSPORTING MATERIALS Filed Nov. 1, 1947 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 [NI/E TOR ROY w. GAUSMANN ATTORNEYS June 26, 1951 R. w. GAUSMANN APPARATUS FOR TRANSPORTING MATERIALS 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Nov. 1, 1947 N N W s 3 w 3 vw N 1 W ATTORNEYS Patented June 26, 1951 APPARATUS FOR TRANSPORTING MATERIALS Roy Warner Gausmann, New York, N. Y., as-

signor to Industrial Metal Protectives, 1110., Wilmington, Del., a corporation of Delaware A Application November 1, 1947, Serial No. 783,592

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for heating and transporting substances, especially liquids, and particularly such methods and apparatus in connection with rail mounted cars and the like.

While the use of refrigerated railway cars for keeping foodstufis cold during transportation is well known, heretofore it has not been possible to accomplish an opposite result and to maintain substances heated to a predetermined temperatureduring transportation by rail.

This is sometimes of advantage because it may be necessary to prevent chemical changes in the material being transported, or to prevent it from solidifying within the car whereupon it would have to be heated to be removed therefrom. Often it would offer an economy for the material to be hot when it reaches its destination in order to permit it to be used immediately.

Accordingly, the primary object of the present invention is to provide a method and apparatus for heating and maintaining heated substances being conveyed in a tank car.

Another object is the provision of a relatively simple arrangement for applying heat to a substance being conveyed in a tank car.

It is another object to provide a heating arrangement for a tank car which will not interfere in any way with the normal use of the car.

A still further object is to provide a method and apparatus for heating a tank car employing steam.

A still further object is the provision of a steam heating system for a tank car which is economical to operate.

These and other objects and advantages will become more apparent upon reference to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure '1 is a view ofone end of a car constructed according to this invention and having a portion of the insulating covering thereof broken away;

Figure 2 is a side elevation of a car constructed according to this invention before the covering of insulation and the sheet metal shield thereover has been applied;

Figure 3 is an end view of the car looking from the left end of Figure 2; s

Figure 4 is a development of the heating coils which lie along the lower surface of the tank of the car and transmit heat therethrough to the substance carried by the car;

4 Claims. (01. 257198) Figure 5 is a vertical section through the car and is indicated by the line 55 on Figure 1;

Figure 6 is a view similar to Figure 5 but considerably enlarged to show the details of construction;

Figure 7 is a fragmentary view indicated by the line 1-1 on Figure 2 and showing details in connection with the expansion hangers for the heating coils.

Figure 8 is a. plan section indicated by the line 88 on Figure 2 and taken over one end of the car frame or chassis and shows details of corn struction in connection with the frame which supports the insulation and covering of this invention on the car;

Figure 9 is a section taken on the line 9--9' of v Figure '7 and shows the manner of securing the frame of this invention to the central I beam which forms a part of the car frame;

Figure 10 is a section indicated by the line llll0 on Figure 11 and shows the appearance of the connection of the frame of this invention to the central I beam of the car frame in plan; Figure 11 is a side view of a part of the frame of this invention; and

Figure 12 is an elevational view taken at one of the corners of the frame of this invention.

Referring to the drawings more in detail,

Figure 1 shows a tank car which is substantially standard as regards the car frame or chassis indicated at It, the truck assemblies as indicated at E2, and the tank [4 carried by the car.

The purpose of this invention is to provide a heating arrangement for the tank M for transporting substances therein which may be main-- tained at a predetermined temperature and to this end there is provided a heating coil arrangement at 16 which extends along the lower part of the car and which is supplied with steam for maintaining the said predetermined temperature in the tank :4. 1

The entire tank l4 and the coil I5 are preferably covered by a layer of heat insulation t8 which is retained in position by a sheet metal covering 20 which is suitably secured to a super- 'an inlet valve at 24 and a discharge valve at 26.

The steam entering through the valve 24 follows 3 a serpentine path in passing through the heatin coil and efficiently transfers its heat energy to the tank.

It will be understood that both of the valves 24 and 26 could be inlet valves if desired whereby the sections of the coil l6 lying on opposite sides of the vertical center line of the tank would be connected in parallel thereby promoting uniformity of temperature over the entire heated surface.

The coil It may be, as shown in Figures 5 and 6, mounted on an arcuate bracket 28 which is spaced from the surface of the tank as by the channel means 30. A plurality of U bolts 32 secure the reaches of the coil Hi to the bracket.

Inasmuch as the coil it will expand and contract during the heating and cooling thereof it is rigidly supported on the tank at only one point. This is by the hanger 28 while the hangers indicated at 34 in Figure 2 are constructed as-shown in Figure '7, this view indicating that the U bolt hangers 36 and brackets 34 are over-size relative to thecoil l6.

As mentioned before, the layer of insulation l8 surrounds the entire tank and at the bottom of the tank said insulation is spaced from the tank to provide a'space for receiving the heating coil [6. The insulation prevents any substantial loss of heat from the heating coil while the space between the tank and coil prevents the development of hot spots on the tank. The material may be maintained at a relatively high temperature without any danger of burning the same;

The frame work which supports the insulation and the sheet metal covering 2!] thereof will best be seen in Figures 8, 9 and 10. It will be noted that secured to the central I beam 50 of the car frame is a fiat plate 52. The connection between the beam and plate is preferably by welding as indicated at 54. Extending laterally outwardly from the plate 52 are spaced T sections 56. The T sections preferably have the web part 58 secured t the plate 52 as by the angle clips 60 and the bolts 62. At the outer ends of the T sections 56 there is the longitudinally extending angle 64 which is secured to the T sections as by the angle clips 66 and bolts 68.

Extending vertically from the angles 64 which extend along each side of the car are the I beams 10 which have their lower ends secured together with the web part 58 of the T sections 56 to the angle 64 by the clips 66. These I sections, of which there are a plurality along the length of the car as indicated in Figure 2, have at their upper ends a longitudinally extending angle 12 which corresponds with the angle 64 at the bottom of the said I beams. Similarly to the arrangement at the bottom of the I beams, the angle 12 is secured thereto by the angle clips 14 and bolts 16.

At the ends of the car, there are the vertically extending angles 18 which are connected with the top and bottom angles 64 and I2 by angle'clips and bolts as at 80. A second corner angle 82 is disposed inwardly of the corner angle 18 and is also connected with the top and bottom frame angles 64 and 12 by the angle clips and bolts 84. A transverse angle 86 across each end of the car is connected with the inner corner angle 82 by the angle clips and bolts 88.

For further stiffening the frame assembly, the upper angles 12 are preferably welded along the side of the tank as indicated at 98 in Figure 8.

In joining the T section 56 to the plate 52 and the angle 64, the base of the said T section is 4 preferably cut off and only the web portion thereof extends over the said plate and angle. This is for the purpose of providing a continuous flat surfac commencing at the plate and extending along the top surface of the base of the T sec-l tion and on to the top surface of the base of the angle. This fiat surface is utilized, as gwill be seen in Figures 1, and 6, for supporting the blocks of insulation I9.

Similarly arranged, with regard to the flanges are the. vertical channel members and the angles 84 and '72. This will be seen in Figure 10 and the purpose of this arrangement is to pro vlde'space for receiving the blocks of insulation 2 I, best seen in Figures 1, 5 and 6. I

With the insulation around the bottom of the car prepared in blocks and mounted in this man:

her the removal thereof fer inspection of the coil'is very simple and any necessary servicing of the coil can readily be carried out.

After thefr'ame has been placed on 'the'ca'r and the heating coils assembled therewith, the insulation, which is preferably in the form of pads or blocks, is placed over the top and bottom of the tank and thereafter the sheet metal covering 26 is placed in position and secured to the farmework described above. The result is a car which is neat in appearance but which at the" sametime is well insulated against the loss of heat therefrom. 5" It will be understood that-the heating coil l6' could include suitable automatic control means such as thermostatically controlled valves or flow regulators if desired according to practices well known in the art.

Thecoil I6 is also preferably provided withthe brackets for the heating coil directly to the surface of the tank and, accordingly, it is desired to comprehend such modifications within this invention as may fall Within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a tank car; a layer of heat insulation completely enclosing the tank thereof; said in-.

sulation being separated from the tank along substantially the lower half of the surface of said tank; and heating means disposed between the insulation and the tank and along the surface of said tank for transmitting heat into said tank, said heating means comprising steam coils, said. steam coils being of serpentine construction and comprising a series of parallel sections ,extending longitudinally of said tank car and short lengths .of pipe forming U-bends joining each pair of parallel sections, and, arcuate hangers extending closely adjacent the outside lower surface of said tank and spaced from said tank and said insulation, said hangers supporting in spaced relationship the parallel lengths of said pipe.

2. In a tank car having a tank; a car frame;

cradle arms supported from the center beam of the car frame, the vertical portions of which end tangent to the tank at its point of maximum width; interconnecting members extending between both the top and bottom of the vertical 7 portions of said cradle arms to form a framework along the side of the tank; cross members adjacent to the top and bottonr of the vertical portionsiffof the end cradle armsiof the opposite sides of the tank passing tangent to the dished ends of said tank; spaced arcuate members mounted on the tank and adjacent thereto and in the space between said tank and said framework, said arcuate members paralleling the contour of the bottom half of said tank; heating coils carried by said arcuate members; a layer of heat insulation surrounding the upper part of said tank; and a plurality of blocks of heat insulated material mounted in said framework and being supported completely} around their periphery by the aforementioned interconnected framework and defining a box-like enclosure around the lower part of said tank, the block form of said insulation permitting its easy removal for inspecting or repairing said heating coils.

3. In a tank car having a tank; a framework; spaced arcuate members mounted on the tank and adjacent thereto and in the space between said tank and said framework, said arcuate members paralleling the contour of the bottom half of said tank; heating coils carried by said arcuate members; a layer of heat insulation surrounding the upper part of saidztank; and a plurality of blocks of heat insulated material mounted in said framework and being supported completely around their periphery by the aforementioned interconnected framework and defining a box-like enclosure around the lower part of said tank, the block form of said insulation permitting its easy removal for inspecting or repairing saidheatlng coils.

4. In a tank car having a tank;} a car frame; a framework including interconnecting members extending along the side. of thei tank; spaced arcuate members mounted on the tank and adjacent thereto and in the space between said tank and said framework, said arcuate members paralleling the contour of the bottom' half of said tank; heating coils carried by said arcuate members; a layer of heat insulation surrounding the upper part of said tank; and a plurality of blocks of heat insulated material mounted in said framework and being supported completely around their periphery by the raforementioned interconnected framework andgdefining a boxlike enclosure around the lower part of said tank, the block form of said insulation permitting its easy removal for inspecting or repairing said heating coils.

ROY WARNER" GAUSMANN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1614107 *Nov 25, 1924Jan 11, 1927William R ClearySteam chamber for tank cars
US1914585 *May 20, 1931Jun 20, 1933Union Tank Car CoTank heating device
US2145614 *May 12, 1937Jan 31, 1939Union Starch And Refining CompHeating and insulating means for tank cars
US2463880 *Feb 26, 1946Mar 8, 1949Bethlehem Steel CorpSupporting means for storage tanks
GB489120A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3228466 *Apr 24, 1964Jan 11, 1966Union Tank Car CoExternal heating arrangement for a storage tank
US4342921 *May 11, 1981Aug 3, 1982Williams Thomas JLocomotive energy recovery system
US4476788 *Dec 30, 1982Oct 16, 1984Richard LoevingerHeated railroad tank car
US4480370 *Jun 7, 1982Nov 6, 1984Loevinger Richard PHeated railroad tank car
US4594948 *Sep 4, 1984Jun 17, 1986Thrall Car Manufacturing CompanyLiquid and solid dual lading railroad car
US7975622 *Jun 17, 2009Jul 12, 2011Trinity Industries, Inc.System and method for reinforcing railway tank cars
US8195313 *Jan 17, 2012Jun 5, 2012Nest Labs, Inc.Thermostat user interface
US8393359Feb 22, 2011Mar 12, 2013Altex Energy Ltd.Dual purpose bitumen/diluent railroad tank car
US8489243Oct 1, 2012Jul 16, 2013Nest Labs, Inc.Thermostat user interface
US8706270Jun 18, 2013Apr 22, 2014Nest Labs, Inc.Thermostat user interface
US8918219Oct 7, 2011Dec 23, 2014Google Inc.User friendly interface for control unit
US8998102Aug 12, 2014Apr 7, 2015Google Inc.Round thermostat with flanged rotatable user input member and wall-facing optical sensor that senses rotation
US9026232Sep 16, 2014May 5, 2015Google Inc.Thermostat user interface
US9092039Mar 14, 2013Jul 28, 2015Google Inc.HVAC controller with user-friendly installation features with wire insertion detection
US20120130547 *May 24, 2012Nest Labs, Inc.Thermostat user interface
EP0860379A1 *Feb 12, 1998Aug 26, 1998GERHARD ENGINEERING GmbHTemperable tank
Classifications
U.S. Classification105/358, 105/451, 105/409, 165/169, 165/171
International ClassificationB65D88/74, B65D88/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D88/744
European ClassificationB65D88/74F