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Publication numberUS2558700 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 26, 1951
Filing dateOct 30, 1946
Priority dateOct 30, 1946
Publication numberUS 2558700 A, US 2558700A, US-A-2558700, US2558700 A, US2558700A
InventorsArchibald R Burgess
Original AssigneeMarion L J Lambert
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carbonated beverage dispensing valve
US 2558700 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 26, 1951 A. R. BURGEss CARBONATED 'BEVERAGE DISPENSING VALVE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed 0G13. 30, 1946 /M/ENTQR ARCHIBALD R. BURGESS @www TTORA/EY June 26, 1951 I A. R. BURGSS 29553276 CARBONATED BEVERAGE DISPENSING VALVE l. ewnyiey /M/E/vm/Q ARCHIBALD R. BuRGEss Patented 'June ze, `1951 ,Y CARBONATEDBEVERAGEDISPENSING VALVE Archibaldl. urgeseist- Legis, assignee-.lily mesne assignments, to Marion V LL Jljjambeft, doing business asi-Crystal-Flo Products GonfpanyyStl'LoiisyMm Y .evrliaiienocaizer a0 gelesenen-e7nel --11- Claims. (c1. zopas-f2.1.)

This .invention relates in ,general i0 Certain Figure 19 is a, fragme arysetionaxyiew-taigep new and "useful improvements in Caitbqnated alee'lipe'ln-ligf "9 `beverage dispensing valves. ve'

f It is the primary object of-the present invention to vprovide a carbonatedV beverage dispensing 5 valve'w'hich is simple and compact in Construcitionand which vcan be readily attached to any existing beveragedispensing system.

n "It is a further object of the' present invention to provide a valve of the type stated which is 10 capable of optionally dispensing a properly proportioned ,flavored carbonated drink oruniavored carbonated water, asl desired.

It is an additional object of the present invention to providea valye of the type vstatedwhich is capable of dispensing carbonated lWater Withoutappreciable-floss of gaseous carbon dioxide, 'Y rlv. r "y "a, 11e

thereby supplying a carbonated drinkrhaving antunusually high degree of retained carbonation. @It` is also an object of the present invention'to provvidel a valverofi'the vtype stated which canbe precisely adjusted to ,throttle the-,now ofcfarbonated Water at any desired rate Within substantially Dreadflimits. It is llikewise an object of the present inven- @ionl toprovide a valve of the type stated Which can be readily-:and quickly dismantled and reassembledforreplacernent of washer anda'ny other similar parts.

with theabove and other vobjects in view, n'yj invention resides in the novelieatures of form, construction, arrangement, and combination of p artshpresentlydescribedand pointed out inV the claims.

In the accompanying drawings lFig-urel is aperspective'vi'ew ofa Apreferred form of carbonated beverage dispensing: valve constructed-in' accordance with and embodyingv the present'n'ventin;

Figure 2is a vertical sectional View ofjthebCVerage dispensing valve taken along line 2' 2 lof Figure 1;` Y

Figures-3 and 4 are transverse sectional vviewsof the valve taken along lines 3l3 and 4 4, respectively, of'Figure 2 a Figures 5 andn are fragmentary sectional vien/stjalenvv along lines 5 5. and 6`-',6, respectively, of Figure 4;

Figure V'l is avvertical sectional View showing the valve in position for dispensing a avoredbeverage; Figure; 8 -is afragmentary sectional view-,taken a1Qne.1ine;8.-8 @Figure '1;

l Figure 9 isa vertical viewshowing the valve ip position'for dispensing carbnatedlwaterpigly; and

greater ofthe recesses I3, 25,"al

21, 28, 29, 30, will present a sinuous contour, as

shown in Figures 2, '1, and 9.

Shiftably mounted concentrically within the discharge passage 24 is a valve stem 3| rigidly provided at its upper end with a shouldered poppet 32 having an upwardly projecting guide stem 33 extending into the poppet guide-recess II and being normally urged downwardly by means of a compression spring 34 into seated engagement against the upper face of the rubber collar 26. At its lower end, the stem 3| projects downwardly beyond'the discharge passage 24 and is threaded for receiving a downwardly pointedconcentric cone 35, the apex of which is normally located just above the plane of the discharge nozzle 23.

' Extending horizontally in and projecting radially outwardly from the side faces of the cone 35, at an angle of approximately 120 to each other, are three round-ended guide pins 36 adapted to ride loosely against the inner face of the nozzle I9 for holding the cone" 35 and its associated valve stem 3| in substantially concentric alignment during upward and downward movement. Upon its upper end face, the cone is provided with upwardly projecting concentric roundtopped ridges 31, 38, and round-bottomed grooves 39, 48, respectively matching and complementarily tting within and around the grooves and ridges 21, 28, 29, 30, of the nozzle member I9. Extending vertically through the valve body I, in spaced parallel relation to the recess 1 and adjacent to the front end face 5,'is a bore 4I opening at its upper end upon the upper end face 3 and being internally threaded for a short distance downwardly therefrom to threadedly receive a flat disk-like end plug 42, which is centrally bored and counter-bored in the provision of a check Valve port 43 and a downwardly opening ball socket 44. About midway of the valve body I, the bore 4| is reduced in diametral size in the provision of a shoulder 45 having a raised annular valve seat 46, and, in eiect, forming a valve chamber 41 within the upper end of the bore 4I. Snugly fitted within the lower or reduced-size end of the bore 4I for lengthwise shiftable, but leakproof movement therein, is a syrup discharging spout 48, which, at its upper end, projects upwardly into the valve chamber 41 and in diametrally enlarged and undercut for receiving a downwardly presented annular ring washer 49 for seated engagement against the valve seat 46. Upon its upper end face the spout 48 is provided with a slightly raised concentric projection 5|) forv receiving the lower end of a compression spring 5|, which is, in turn, at its upper end retentively seated against the under side of a small check valve ball 52 operatively disposed within the recess 44 for seated engagement within the port 43. Directly beneath the region of the ring washer 49, the spout 48 is turned to a slightly reduced diametral size and is provided with a plurality of radially extending orifices 53 connecting the interior of the spout 48 with the interior of the valve chamber 41 when the spout 48 is lifted to the position shown in Figure '1.

Opening upon the rear face 6 of the valve body I and extending horizontally thereinto, in spaced parallel relation to the bore I5, is a bore 54 at its forward end intersecting the side wall of and opening into the valve chamber 41 and being internally threaded at its rearward end for receiving a conventional fitting 55 connected to a syrup supply line 56.

At its lower end, the spout 48 projects downwardly below the bottom Wall 2 of the valve body I and terminates in a discharge orifice 51 which is normally in coplanar alignment with the discharge orice 23 of the nozzle member I9 when the valve A is in closed position, as shown in Figure 9.

The syrup spout 48, for a short portion of its length entirely within the reduced-size portion of the bore 4| and upwardly from the bottom wall 2 of the valve body I, is turned to a somewhat reduced diameter in the provision of an annular recess or groove 58. In the same region or area, the valve body I is provided with a transversely extending horizontal bore 59 opening at its opposite ends upon the sides faces 4, 4', and an intersecting angular bore 6D, the center line of which is approximately in the same plane as, and at an angle of 120 to, the center lines of the pins 36. Snugly and rotatively fitted within the bore 59, in the region of its intersection with the bore 6|), is an actuator pin 6| provided at its inner end with an angularly cut Vflat cam section 62, the latter being located within the com-- mon area of intersection between the bores 59, 66. Upon the outer end face, the pin 6| is flush with the side face 4 of the valve body and is integrally provided with an outwardly projecting flatsided attachment boss 63. Also snugly and rotatively fitted within the bore 59 and extending inwardly from the side face 4 of the valve body I', is a second actuator pin 64 terminating at its inner end just short of the syrup spout 48 and being provided with an axially projecting eccentrically located pin-like projection 65 adapted to iit within the spout-groove 58. At itsV outer end, the pin 64 is substantially flush with the side face 4 of the valve body and is integrally provided with a fiat-sided boss 66. Fixed upon the bosses 63, 66, and secured thereto by fiat-headed retainer screws 61, 68, which are threaded axially into the actuator pins 6|, 64, respectively, is a clevis-shaped dispensing handle 69 which extends outwardly beyond the front end face 5 of the valve body I and is preferably provided with an inserted rectangular Bakelite block 10 which serves as an artistic hand grip or knob and is held in place by a tubular sleeve 1| extending between the parallel side arms of the clevisshaped handle 69 and being threaded at its opposite ends for receiving flat-headed retainer screws 12, 13.

Extending through the angular bore 68 and inserted within the cone 35 is a cone actuating pin 14 which rests upon the upwardly presented flat camming face of the actuator pin 6I, the bore 60 being finally closed by a threadedly inserted end plug 15.

In actual use, the nozzle member I9 may be threaded upwardly, thereby shifting the nozzle cup I9 upwardly and axially shortening or compressing the rubber collar 26, causing it to bulge inwardly, as shown in Figure 2, thereby reducing or throttling the size of the discharge passage to control the rate of flow of carbonated water therethrough. The inward bulging of the rubber collar 26 will also produce a Venturi-like or streamline constriction at the throttling point in' the :valve .so 4.that theflow1-ofycarbonated water through theconstricted .area will .be substantially .non-.turbulent .andthe .gas .content thereof will notrbelostor .scrubbed out, so to speak. i Y

'1t will thus be .seen-by .a simple manual rotation of the Anozzle .1.8, it is possible to--achieve veri/...accurate adjustment in .this respect. rlvhis particular .adjustment is .unique :andextremely important ina. beverage .dispensing valve 4because the rate of Vflow .ofsyrup is not readily controllable andwillflowat .a rate, which, for all practical purposes, is .fairly yconstant Yfor la .substantial period of time. lherate of flow of the ASyrup will, of course, vary. in proportion to .variations inthe hydrostatic head .of/.the `syrup .contained in the .reservoir or storage tank (not shcwn) ,bu-t, dueto the .relativelyhigh viscosity :of-the syrup, the eifectofsuch hydrostatic headisrnot particularly critical. .Howeven Ithe syrup Ywillflow somewhatlfaster whenthe storage tank is fullandconseduently Va somewhat .greater quantity of syrup will, .under such..condition,be .dispensed in a ygiv en unit .of time .and a `carbonated drinkfwll have a...greater proportion .of .flavoring .syrup -than a drink which is `made -Whenthe storage tank is 1 elatively.empty. With .the present beveragedispensing valve A, .this-variation can4 be very` .quick-7 ly .and Aconveniently compensated .by Vthe throt- .tling adjustment ofthe discharge .passage 2li. For example',.in the-caseof asocia .fountain or 4`soft drinkldispensing bar equipped with the valve A, wherethesyrup Ystorage tank must be -i-villed every twoor .three days,.it .will merely be necessary vto makea .throttling adjustment once every day or so, .reducing .the .ratetof :flow of the carbonated waterslightly .as therate ofow of-.syrup is reduced. commercial practice at .the ordinary drug-store, soda fountain, and the like, a customer frequently requests that his drink be `made up sweet or dry, that is to say, with either more or less than the usual amount of avoring syrup and the soda dispenser can easily comply with suchrequest by a simple twist of the nozzle member I9 without any loss of time or inconvenience. When it is desired to ldispense a syrupilavored drink, the handle 69 is pushed downwardly, as shown in Figure '7, rotating the actuator pins 6I, 64, whereupon the camming surface 62 lifts the pin .14, cone 35, `the associated valve stem 3|, and the poppet 32 to permit the ow of carbonated water downwardly through the discharge passage 24 past the concentric convolutions of the nozzle cup ;'I-9 andthe end face of cone 35, downwardly through the nozzle member i9 and outwardly through the orifice thereof. At the same time, the pin-like yprojection 65 of the actuator pin 64 is swung eccentrcally upwardly, lifting the spoutll and-thereby allowing the syrup to flow from the chamber l1 .through the orifices 53, downwardly through the interior of the spout 48, and outwardly `from the discharge orifice 5'! thereof. The discharging syrup and carbonated water will flow simultaneously downwardly into a glass or otherdrink receptacle and will .be thoroughly intermixed.

When it is desired to dispense unflavored or plain carbonated water, the handle 69 is shifted upwardly, as shown in Figure 9, rotatingr the actuator pins 6l, 64, in the opposite direction. Inasmuch as the camming surface 62 of the actuator vpin 6l is flat, it will lift the pins -14 when rotated 'in either direction. Thus, when the handle 69 .is swung upwardly and -the actu.

ator .pin 6I is rotated thereby, the vpins 14 and the associated Acomponent vparts .of the .carbon.

ated `lauwe.rag@ valve mechanism Ywill be 4@pencil tofprmit the new of c rebonated water.. v.How- .everi the upward .Swinging movement .of the handle 69 rw-illrotate the lactu a .tcJr pinilll inzfsuch a manner ythat the pin-'like .projection .-65 .will `Swine vdownwardlr away from abutment .with 4the shoulder formed by .thefgrocve 58 in vt-he syrup spOutAB, as best :seenvin Figure 1Q,.and will thus leave thelatter stationary, V.so fthatfno syrup will be discharged.

1fBiy reason of the .concentric :convolutons form-ed between the .concentric grooves and ridges 21, 28, 29..30,3.1,.3 8 39,40, ofthe downwardly presented face ofthenozzle-cup I9 and the `upwardly presented face of :the .cone-35 reyspectively, the .carbonated vwater .issuing from the-.discharge .passage .24 will .undergo a Somewhat gradual decrease .in .pressure and willgbe substantially .non-turbulent in character, .with the .result .that the .entrained .and .dissolved carbon dioxide gas will not ,bescrubbed out and lost in .any appreciable quantity .as .the Vcarbonated water flows into Athe .glass .or ldrinking receptacle. For this reason, the carbonated water dispensed from a valve constructedin accordance with the present invention will have ,a .much higher percentage of residual carbonation than will .carbonated water dispensed y'from vconventional faucets.

,-.It Ashould '.be understood that changes and modications 'inY the form, construction, arrangement, and lcombination of'ithe `severaljparts of the 'dispensing valvenlay vibe jmade and substituted for those *herein shown vand "described without departing from `the Ynature and principle of vmy invention.

vHaving thus described 'my invention, what claim and desire -to secure rby Lettersi'Patent is:

1. A valve kfor'controlli-ng*the flow of uids comprising a -Valvebody having vi'irstfand second Jpassages 'extending therethrough, l-said V-lrst passage beingeccnstricted intermediate its ends inthe provisionof -a valve-seat, r-a tubular'spout slidabl-y mountedfin one end of -said'rst-passage and `projecting finwardly -beyond rthe constriction, being provided on such inwardly projecting end 'rwith a-closure .element for valve-forming eo-op'erationwiththe valve seat, -a :tubular memberlfmountedin Land Aprojecting from 'fthe'.lower endof :said second .passage .and -being provided at its upper-.end with a .valve` seatfforming. end

.l face, a stem loosely-.and -shiftably....mounted in and 'extending through said' rt-ubular '.membenwa va`l.ve. poppen-fixed .'.upon :the zupper. end ,of 4:said stem for co-.operation withtheseat forming .fend face, andzhandle zmea-ns :for .simultaneously :lifting f.,thespout,v.fistern, and the .associated .closure elementl'an'd pcppetifor openingbcth of said pas.-

sages and v permitting :the ieilow of ,uids A.therea through.

:.2. valve .,for .controlling .the :.ilow. of .fluids comprising a valve body .having :rstand secondgpassages extending,therethrough, .said first passage being constrictedintermediate its .ends

member, a valve poppet xed upon the upper end of said stem for co-operation with the seat forming end face, and handle means mounted upon the valve body for swingable movement in two directions and being adapted, upon movement in one such direction, for simultaneously lifting the spout, stem and the associated closure element and poppet for opening both of said passages and permitting the flow of fluids therethrough and being further adapted, uponmovement in the other direction, for lifting only the stem of its associated poppet for permitting flow of fluids through the second passage only.

3. A valve for controlling the ow of fluids comprising a valve body having first and second passages extending therethrough, said first passage being constricted intermediate its ends in the provision of a valve seat, a tubular spout slidably mounted in one end of said rst passage and lprojecting inwardly beyond the constriction, being provided on such inwardly projecting end with a closure element for valveforming co-operation with the valve seat, a tubular member mounted in the lower end of said second passage and being provided at its upper end witha valve seat forming end face, a stem loosely and shiftably mounted in and extending through said tubular member, a valve poppet fixed upon the upper end of said stem for co-operation with the seat forming end face, a discharge nozzle mounted on the valve body and projecting downwardly from the tubular member, a downwardly pointed cone-shaped member disposed within the nozzle and being connected to the stem for movement therewith, an abutment shoulder on the spout, actuating means on the cone-sha'ped member, a pair of pins rockably mounted in the body for operative engagement respectively with the shoulder and actuating means, and handle means mounted on the pins for rocking the pins and thereby simultaneously lifting the spout, stem and the associated closure element and poppet for opening both of said passages and permitting the flow of fluids therethrough.

4. A valve for controlling the flow of fluids comprising a valve body having first and second passages extending therethrough, said first passage being constricted intermediate fits ends in the provision of a valve seat, a tubular spout slidably mounted in one end of said first passage and projecting inwardly beyond the constriction, being provided on such inwardly projecting end with a closure element for valve-forming cooperation with the valve seat, a tubular member mounted in the lower end of said second passage and being provided at its upper end with a valve seat forming end face, a stem loosely and shiftably mounted in and extending through said tubular member, a valve poppet fixed upon the upper end of said stem for co-operation with the seat forming end face, a discharge nozzle mounted on the valve body and projecting downwardly from the tubular member, a downwardly pointed cone-shaped member disposed within the nozzle and being connected to the stem for'movement therewith, an abutment shoulder on the spout, a radially projecting rod on the coneshaped member, a rst pin rockably mounted in the valve body and` having a flat lift-face engaging the pin for lifting the rod when rocked in either direction, a second pin rockably mounted in the valve body and having'an eccentric projection engageable with the shoulder onlyr when rocked in one direction, and handle means mounted on the pins for rocking them.

5. A valve for controlling the flow of fluids comprising a valve body having first and second passages extending therethrough, said first passage being constricted intermediate its ends in the provision of a Valve seat, a tubular spout slidably mounted in one end of said first passage and projecting inwardly beyond the constriction, being provided on such inwardly projecting end with a closure element for valveforming co-operation with the valve seat, a tubular member mounted in the lower end of said second passage and being provided at its upper end with a valve seat forming end face, a stem loosely and shiftably mounted in and extending through said tubular member, a Valve poppet fixed upon the upper end of said stem for co-operation with the seat forming end face, a discharge nozzle mounted on the valve body and projecting downwardly from the tubular member, a downwardly pointed cone-shaped member disposed within the nozzle and being connected to the stem for movement therewith, an abutment shoulder on the spout, a radially projecting rod on the cone-shaped member, a first pin rockably mounted in the valve body and having a flat lift-face engaging the pin for lifting the rod when rocked in either direction, a second pin rockably mounted in the valve body and having an eccen-l tric projection engageable with the shoulder only when rocked in one direction, said pins being axially aligned and projecting outwardly in opposite directions from the valve body and a clevisshaped, swingable handle rigidly mounted on and extending radially from the projecting ends of said pins whereby said pins may be rocked responsive to swinging movement of the handle.

6. A valve for controlling the flow of fluids com-4 prising a valve body having a passage extending therethrough, a flat-ended tubular member mounted in the lower end of said passage, said member being provided at its upper end with a valve seat forming end face and being interiorly contoured to provide a streamlined constriction through which fluid may flow, a stem loosely and shiftably mounted in and extending through said tubular member, a valve poppet fixed upon the upper end of said stem for co-eperation with the seat forming end face, and handle means for lifting the stem and the associated poppet for opening said passage and permitting the flow of fluid therethrough.

7. A valve for controlling the flow of fluids comprising a valve body having a passage extending therethrough, an axially compressible flatended'tubular member mounted in and projecting from the lower end of said passage, said member being provided at its upper end with a valve seat forming end face and being interiorly contoured to provide a streamlined constriction through which fluid may flow, a stem loosely and shiftl ably mounted in and extending through said tubular member, a valve poppet fixed upon the upper end of said stem for co-operation with the seat forming end face, and handle means for lifting the stem and the associated poppet for opening said passage and permitting the flow of fluid therethrough.

V8. A valve for controlling the flow of fluids comprising a valve body having a passage extending therethrough, a flat-ended tubular member mounted in the lower end of said passage, said member being provided at its upper end with a valve seat forming end face and being interiorly contoured to provide a streamlined constriction through which fluid may flow, a stem loosely and shiftably mounted in and extending through said tubular member, a valve poppet fixed upon the upper end of said stem for co-operation with the Seat forming end face, discharge nozzle-forming means threadedly mounted in and projecting downwardly from the valve body and being in endwise abutment with the lower end of the tubular member for optionally imposing greater or lesser axial pressure on the tubular member depending upon the relative position to which said means is screwed into the valve body thereby producing a corresponding increase or decrease in the amount of constriction in the interior of said tubular member, and handle means for lifting the stem and the associated poppet for opening of said passage and permitting the flow of iluid therethrough.Y

9. A valve for' controlling the flow of liquids comprising a valve body having a first passage extending therethrough and being provided with a valve seat. a spout mounted in said first passage and being provided with a closure element for valve forming co-operation with the valve seat, said valve body having a second passage extending therethrough, a tubular member mounted in and projecting from the lower end of said second passage and being provided at one end With a valve` seat forming end face, a stem movably mounted in and extending through said tubular member, a valve poppet fixed upon the upper end of said stem for co-operation with the seat forming end face, and handle means for simultaneously lifting the spout, stem, and associated closure element and poppet for opening both of said passages and permitting the ow of uids therethrough.

10. A valve for controlling the ow of fluids comprising a valve body having a passage extending therethrough, a flat-ended tubular member mounted in the lower end of said passage, said member being provided at its upper end with a valve seat forming end face and being interiorly contoured to provide a streamlined constriction through which fluid may flow, a stem loosely and shiftably mounted in and extending through said tubular member, a valve poppet fixed upon the upper end of said stem for co-operation with the seat forming end face, discharge nozzleforming means threadedly mounted in and projecting downwardly from the valve body and being in endwise abutment with the lower end of the tubular member for optionally imposing greater or lesser axial pressure on the tubular member depending upon the relative position to which said meansv is screwed into the valve body thereby producing a corresponding increase or decrease in the amount of constriction in the interior of said tubular member, a downwardly pointed cone-shaped member disposed within the nozzle and beingconnected to the stem for movement therewith, and handle means for lifting the stem and the associated poppet for opening of said passage and permitting the oW of uid therethrough.

11. A valve for controlling the flow of fluids comprising a valve body having rst and second passages extending therethrough, said rst passage being contoured to provide a valve seat, a tubular spout slidably mounted in said rst passage, a rst closure element provided on said spout for valve-forming co-operation with the valve seat, a tubular member mounted in said second passagey and being provided at one end with a valve seat-forming end face, a stem shiftably mounted in and extending through said tubular member, a second closure element provided on said stem for co-operation with the seat-forming end face, and means for simultaneously moving the spout, stem, and the associated first and secondclosure elements for opening both of said passages and permitting the iiow of liquids therethrough.

ARCHIBALD R. BURGESS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,603,082 Jacobs Oct. 12, 1926 1,640,945 Leibing Aug. 30, 1927 2,416,582 Harr Feb. 25, 1947V

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1603082 *Jan 13, 1925Oct 12, 1926Anthony Jacobs IvernSelective mixing faucet
US1640945 *Apr 28, 1926Aug 30, 1927Magnus Fruit Products CoDispensing faucet
US2416582 *Aug 11, 1945Feb 25, 1947Harr Herman HMixing and dispensing faucet
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3727844 *Apr 30, 1971Apr 17, 1973Eaton CorpDispensing apparatus
US3891180 *Oct 23, 1973Jun 24, 1975White Westinghouse CorpLow pressure liquid dispensing valve
US4408701 *Oct 9, 1981Oct 11, 1983Cadbury Schweppes PlcLiquid dispensing valve
US4523697 *Oct 9, 1981Jun 18, 1985Cadbury Schweppes LimitedLiquid dispensing package
US5423245 *Apr 13, 1994Jun 13, 1995Bunn-O-Matic CorporationMilk foaming device
US6223791Oct 21, 1999May 1, 20013M Innovative Properties CompanyGravity feed fluid dispensing valve
US6354346Mar 1, 2001Mar 12, 20023M Innovative Properties CompanyGravity feed fluid dispensing valve
US6367521Feb 22, 2001Apr 9, 20023M Innovative Properties CompanyGravity feed fluid dispensing valve
US6450214Aug 31, 2001Sep 17, 20023M Innovative Properties CompanyGravity feed fluid dispensing valve
US6488058Jul 19, 1999Dec 3, 20023M Innovative Properties CompanyGravity feed fluid dispensing valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/636.1, 137/636, 251/122, 137/595, 239/445, 239/423, 251/127, 138/46
International ClassificationB67D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB67D1/0048, B67D1/0082
European ClassificationB67D1/00H2B4D, B67D1/00H8B