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Publication numberUS2559921 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 10, 1951
Filing dateMar 20, 1943
Priority dateMar 20, 1943
Publication numberUS 2559921 A, US 2559921A, US-A-2559921, US2559921 A, US2559921A
InventorsAnthony Aiello, Joseph Aiello
Original AssigneeHarry Landaw, Hyman Landaw
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic machine for sequentially immersing machine parts in successive cleaning liquids
US 2559921 A
Abstract  available in
Images(10)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 10, 1951 A. AIELLO ET AL 2,559,921

AUTOMATIC MACHINE FOR SEQUENTIALLY IMMERSING MACHINE PARTS IN SUCCESSIVE CLEANING LIQUIDS 1O Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 20, 1943 7 lllllll IIIIIIIIII Inventor y 10, 1951 A. AIELLO ETAL 2,559,921 NG MACHINE AUTOMATIC MACHINE FOR SEQUENTIALLY IMMERSI PARTS IN SUCCESSIVE CLEANING LIQUIDS Filed Mafch 20, 1943 10 Sheets-Sheet 2 flmvzarg/y A'z'eJZo Jase/27v A'ziello By 2%., and

x a Mli July 10, 1951 A. AIELLO ET AL 2,559,921

AUTOMATIC MACHINE FOR SEQUENTIALLY IMMERSING MACHINE PARTS IN SUCCESSIVE CLEANING LIQUIDS Filed March 20, 1945 10 Sheets-Sheet 3 /4;0 I29 I29 5 l 3/ 4/ c Inventor Araifiwyy Az'eZZo Jose/97o fiz'eZZa July'lo, 1951 A. AIELLO ETAL 2,559,921

AUTOMATIC MACHINE FOR SEQUENTIALLY IMMERSING MACHINE PARTS IN SUCCESSIVE CLEANING LIQUIDS 10 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed March 20, 1943 gJsgek flz'ello July 10, 1951 A. AIELLO ETAL AUTOMATIC MACHINE FOR SEQUENTIALLY IMMERSING MACHINE PARTS IN SUCCESSIVE CLEANING LIQUIDS l0 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed March 20, 1943 Inventor fire/2720711 Az'eZZo \fvse izelzo 2A and 2,559,921 MACHIN July 10, 1951 A. AIELLO ET AL AUTOMATIC MACHINE FOR SEQUENTIALLY IMMERSING PARTS IN SUCCESSIVE CLEANING LIQUIDS l0 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed March 20, 1943 Inventor y W m July 10, 195] AIELLQ E'IAL 2,559,921

AUTOMATIC MACHINE FOR SEQUENTIALLY IMMERSING MACHINE PARTS IN SUCCESSIVE CLEANING LIQUIDS Filed March 20, 1943 10 Sheets-Sheet 7 Inventor flat/207g flzfe Z Z0 QH/Z By I if y y 1951 A. AIELLO ET AL 2,559,921

AUTOMATIC MACHINE FOR SEQUENTIALLY IMMERSING MACHINE PARTS IN SUCCESSIVE CLEANING LIQUIDS Filed March 20, 1943 10 Sheets-Sheet a In ven tar flrziwa flzeZZa J05 ep JaeZZo 9 Mt 94 A 5 m m S o 1 Y 1953 A. AIELLO ETAL AUTOMATIC MACHINE FOR SEQUENTIALLY IMMERSING MACHINE PARTS IN SUCCESSIVE CLEANING LIQUIDS Filed March 20, 1943 Inventor I flwZ/aony flz'eZZo Jose/9Z0 flz'eZZo 21m M iii. #A 2 A. AIELLO ET AL AUTOMATIC MACHINE FOR SEQUENTIALLY IMMERSING MACHINE PARTS IN SUCCESSIVE CLEANING LIQUIDS 10 Sheets-Sheet 10 Filed March 20, 1943 N W m hm N m H I M 88 SQAMNQ :wh\ 4 WIN WW 5m u J A WM m RM Patented July 10, 1951 UNITED STATES" PATENT OFFICE AUTOMATIC MACHINE FOR SEQUENTIALLY INIMERSING MACHINE PARTS IN SUCCES- SIVE CLEANING LIQUIDS Application March 20, 1943, Serial No. 479,948

21 Claims. 1

The invention relates to a machine for cleaning machine parts and the like wherein the parts are successively subjected to washing and rinsing solutions, and more particularly to a machine of this character which is suitable for construction in difierent sizes to accommodate difierent types and sizes of parts, from relatively large parts such as components of firearms and the lik to relatively small parts of such as aeroplane instruments, watches, and the like.

The present application is a continuation-inpart of our co-pending application Serial No. 354,720, filed August 29, 1940, for Watch Cleaning Machine, and now abandoned.

The primary object ofthe invention is to provide a more efficient machine of the type indicated wherein the cycle from initial washing, through several rinsings, to final drying of the parts being cleaned, is performed automatically without attention from the operator, and wherein the duration of the initial washing operation may be predetermined b a simple adjustment.

Another important object of the invention is to provide a machine of this type wherein the Washing solution jar and the desired number of rinsing solution jars are tightly covered during the washing, rinsing and drying operations, so that the inflammable solutions used are confined to the jars and prevented from being splashed out by the action of the machine or by motion of the support on which the machine rests, thereby eliminating the fire-hazard characteristic of former machines, and making the present machine safe for use in places wherein exposure to ignition is likely.

Another important object of the inventionis to provide a machine of the character indicated, wherein the action and cooperation of the parts is precise and accurate, so that the machine operates smoothly and dependably through its cycle. without undue strain or wear upon the component parts.

In accordance with the present invention, provision is made for manually starting the machine; for then causing it to automatically perform a predetermined cycle of operations; and for then causing it to stop until conditioned and manually started to repeat the same cycle of operations. When the machine stops, the immersing unit thereof is in a nearly completely raised.

- unit is thrown out of operation, whereupon the chambers are moved horizontally to bring the next chamber into vertical alignment with the cage. This cycle is repeated until the cage has been successively entered into and withdrawn from all of the chambers and the machine arrives and becomes inoperative at the original starting position. Power means is provided to reciprocate the unit between raised and lowered positions, and a second power means is provided to horizontally move the chambers. Motor-operated timing means is provided to render the first power means inoperative for a predetermined period of time when the unit reaches its lower limit of movement at the washing and drying stations, and to then render the same operative again. Switch means, responsive to the first power means, is provided to energize the cagedriving motor when the unit is lowered and to de-energize it when the unit is raised. Further switch means, responsive to said first power means, is provided to energize the operating motor of the timing means when the unit is lowered at the washing and drying stations and to deenergize it at the expiration of the predetermined period of time.

Other important objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from a reading of the following description and the appended drawings, showing a preferred embodiment of the invention, for illustrative purposes.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevationalview of the machine showing the parts-containing cage in the elevated position to which it moves automatically as the drying operation is completed, the dotted lines showing manual elevation of the jar stopper above the cage and its engagement with a detent to hold the stopper to enable opening or removal of the cage.

Figure 2 is a similar view of the machine showing the combined elevator structure and cage driving motor unit depressed during the d y n operation. l v

Figure 3 is a top plan View of either Figure 1 or Figure 2, showing in dotted lines the locations of the rinsing jars and the washing jar beneath the safety cover.

Figure 4 is a general transverse vertical sectional View on an enlarged scale and taken approximately on the line l4 of Figure 3 and showing the starting switch elements in operated position.

Figure 5 is a horizontal sectional. view taken. through the upper part of Figure 4, with the safety cover and turntable with its jars and drying chamber removed, and looking downwardly.

Figure 6 is a top plan view showing the turntable with its washing jar, rinsing jars, and drying chamber in place thereon.

Figure '7 is a top plan view with the uppersection of the turntable removed.

Figure 8 is a fragmentary vertical transverse sectional View taken through the base of the machine casing alongside of the sprocket chain elevating mechanism.

Figure 9 isa horizontal sectional view taken through Figure 8 along the line 99 and looking downwardly in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 10- is a transverse vertical sectional view taken through the casing base and through portions of the elevator and the associated switchboard operated by a component of the elevator.

Figure 11 is a horizontal sectional view taken through Figure 1-0 along the line i l-l l and looking downwardly in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 12' is a horizontal sectional view taken through Figure 4 and looking upwardly along the line IZ-I2 and showing the underside of the lower section of the turntable.

Figure 13 is an enlarged fragmentary horizontal sectional view taken through the machine casing side wall and through the drying cham her and looking down upon the upper section of the turntable and upon the mechanism which is shown locking the upper section of the turntable relative to a post on the side wall of the said casing, while permitting the lower driven section of the turntable to overrun the upper section as the turntable is rotated into a new jar position and returned to coincidence with the upper section by spring retraction.

Figure 14 is a fragmentary vertical transverse sectional view taken through the turntable and adjacent jar holders and jars and alongside of the turntable operated switch C, and showing one of the depressions in the underside of the lower section of the turntable which permits the switch to close and then be restored to open position during the rotation of the turntable.

Figure 15 is a side elevational view of the rotary timing switch which is operated by clockworks and has positions to predetermine a half-time or a full-time initial washing period in the inital or washing jar.

Figure 16 is a horizontal sectional view taken through Figure 15.

Figure 1'1 is a fragmentary side elevational view, on an enlarged scale, of the machine with the elevator in depressed position, and broken away to show the operative position of the parts containing cage in one of the jars, and to show details of the cage driving mechanism and associated constant speed electric motor, as well as the stoppering position of the jar stopper carried by the cage shaft, relative to the jar and 1 the single access opening in the safety cover.

Figure 18 is a top plan view of the parts containing cage.

Figure 19 is a transverse sectional view taken through Figure 18 along the line l9l9 and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 20 is a view similar to Figure 19 but taken at right angles thereto.

Figure21 is a side elevation of the complete turntable including jar holders and jars and drying chamber.

Figure 22 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional view taken through the upper part of the machine casing and looking downwardly as upon Figure 21, and showing the upper turntable arresting mechanism in released position in contrast to the-locked position shown in Figure 13.

Figure 23 is a side elevational view of the four-gang rotary manual control switch whose operating handle is exposed at the side of the machine casing as shown in Figures 1 and 2.

Figure 24 is a transverse vertical sectional view taken through Figure 23 between two of the disks.

Figure 25 is a transverse vertical sectional view taken through the base of the machine and portions of the outside tube of the elevator mechanism and showing the inner elevatable tube and the switchboard contactor block operated thereby in depressed position, the dotted lines showing these components in elevated position.

Figure 26 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the associated switches F and G and showing the switch F in operated or closed position in full lines and in initial or open position in dotted lines, and showing the switch G in initial or closed position.

Figure 27 is a transverse vertical sectional View taken through the switchboard and showing the opposite side from that shown in Figure 10.

Figure 28 is a perspective view of the switchboard contactor and the pins which operatively connect it with the inner or elevatable tube of the elevator, and,

Figure 29 is a schematic wiring diagram showing the electrical connections between the various electrical elements, and showing the construc tion of the double-acting switches A and D contrasted with the construction of the single-acting switches B, C and E.

Referring in detail to the drawings, the machine comprises a base consisting of a flat ciroular plate 5, supported on feet 6, from the edges of which plate rises a cylindrical wall 7 which is bolted at 8 to the plate 5, the wall I being slightly inset to provide a rest 9 for the lower edge of the cylindrical shell H] which rises above the wall I.

Integral with and rising from the wall 1 are the circumferentially spaced posts II which are surmounted by an integral ring [2. The posts II are exactly equally circumferentially spaced from each other, and in the illustrated embodiment siX such posts are necessitated. In the top of the ring 12 are three holes 13 to receive the depending positioning pins I3 on the cover, as described hereinbelow.

Brackets l4 are equally spaced and secured to the inner side of the wall I and carry rollers l5 projected radially inwardly. The tops of the rollers, three in this case, are substantially on a level with the top of the wall 1, and their function is to rotatably support the turntable I6.

The turntable I6 is a heavy annulus formed with a groove 11 in its bottom to conformably receive the rollers 15 with a smooth running fit, with the edge of the turntable running close to the top of the wall I. The top of the turntable has a shallow flat-bottomed channel defined by the outside rim I8 and the inside rim l9.

Rotatably supported in the channel in the top of the turntable and bearing against the inner rim I9 is the annular base 20' on which the five cylindrical receptacle holders 2| and the single cylindrical drying chamber 2 are mounted. The base 20 is supported on the floor of the channel 20 by circumferentially spaced rollers 22 carried by brackets 23, the rollers depending through slots 24 formed in the base 20, whereby the base 20 is slightly spaced upwardly from the base Hi.

The receptacle holders 2| are equally circumferentially spaced with respect to each other and with respect to the drying chamber 2|, each being of the same diameter and height and each secured to the top of the base 20. The drying chamber 2| is taller than the holders 2| and it has ventilating holes 25 in its sides, and is cut away at 26 along the outer side of its bottom to accommodate mechanical parts to be described. A spacer 26 having holes therein fitting the holders 2| and the drying chamber 2| is frictionally held in place to reinforce and protect the holders and chamber. A large diameter cylinder 21 rests on thespacer 26' and rises above the holders to provide protection for parts to be described and is concentric with respect to the center opening in the base 20' and in the turntable [6.

The portion of the base 20' within each holder 2| is formed with a circumferential slot 28 which is always somewhat in registry with and can be completely registered with complementary slots 28' formed in the turntable Hi. The slots 28 and 28 are provided to enable the elevator rack bar 29 to rise therethrough and push against the bottom of the glass receptacles 30 which are the rack bar 29 to the base of the support 3| re-- turns the rack bar to depressed inoperative position.

The turntable l6 has a ring gear 3% attached concentrically to its bottom and spaced around the opening in the turntable.

which in turn i meshed with a small pinion 49 fixed on a shaft 4| mounted vertically and parallel to the shaft 38 in bearings of two U-shaped.

frames which are bolted together on the plate 5 in an eccentric position with respect to the opening in the turntable.

The shaft 4| has on its lower part a worm wheel 42 which is meshed with a worm 43 fixed With this ring gear is meshed a pinion 3'! fixed on a shaft 38 which also has fixed thereon the gear wheel 39,

on the shaft of a small 2200 R. P. M. electric motor 44 whose base is secured to the base plate 5, and whose manner of energization for turning the turntable H5 is explained hereinafter.

Mounted in a central socket 45 on the base:,70

6 ably telescoped in the tube 46 is another tube 49 which adjacent its lower end has projecting from both sides thereof the pin 59 whose ends work in the slots 41 in the outer tube 46. (See Figure 10.)

Below. the pin 50 a pin 5| extends through on of the slots 41 and turns in a hole in the inner tube 49, a link 52 being fixed to the outer end of the pin 5|. On the opposite side of the inner tube 49 and below the pin 5|, two vertically spaced pins '53 and 54 are fixed to project from the tube 49 through the adjacent slot 41.

The depressed end of the link 52 is pivoted on an extension 55 of one of the link pins of a sprocket chain 56 which is trained over upper and lower sprocket wheels '51 and 58 which are mounted on shafts projecting from a post 59 which is fastened to rise from the base plate 5. The lower shaft 59 has fixed thereon a relatively large gear wheel 6 Guide plates 62 are arranged on opposite sides of the vertical flights of the sprocket chain and are suitably mounted on the post 59.

The gear wheel 6| is meshed with a small pinion 63 fixed on a shaft 64 mounted horizontally on asupport 65 fixed on the plate '5, the shaft carrying a large gear wheel 68. The wheel 66 meshes with a small pinion 61 on a horizontal shaft 68 carried by a support 59 on the plate 5, the shaft 58 having a worm wheel 18 meshed with a worm H on the shaft of a small 2200 R. P. M. electric motor 12 which has its base fixed to plate 5 on the opposite side of the plate from the motor 44. Although the speed and power rating of the motors may be changed, the speed of the two rn0- tors should be the same for proper operation of the machine. The manner of energization of the motor 12 to elevate and depress the inner tube 49 by operating the sprocket chain 56 is described hereinafter.

The glass receptacles or jars 30 are to containthe solution for the cleansing of the watch parts and the like, the first jar containing a washsolution and the succeeding four jars containing gasoline or similar rinse, the jars being tall enough so that when half-filled with solution the revolving parts containing cage to be described can be immersed in the solution when depressed, and will have room in the jar above the solution when elevated to throw off the solution by centrifugal force without splashing the solution on the surrounding structure and mechanism,

thereby preventing fire danger etc.

In its depressed position (shown in Figure 2) the elevatable safety cover 13 has a lining 14 of felt or the like to rest upon the tops of the jars 30 (as indicated in Figure 17) thereby closing all of the jars except that one in registry with the operating opening in the cover to prevent inflammable fluid from splashing out and creating fire danger. The cover consists of a fiat circular plate with a. depending peripheral rim 16 arranged to go down around the ring |2 in the depressed position of the cover. The opening 15 is slightly larger in diameter than the jars so that the jars can be elevated and removed therethrough for changing the solution therein or for other purposes.

The cover has centrally fixed therein a short guide or slide tube H which slidably mounts the cover on the outside tube 45. The opposite projections of the pin 50 engage the lower end of the guide tube 11 to raise and lower it. A helical spring 18 surrounds the guide tube 11 and abuts the top of the cover and when compressed has its upper end abutted with a cross pin I9 adjacent the upper end of the inner tube 49. The pin I9 fits in slots in the lower end of tube 80 of the basket motor assembly to prevent relative rotation of the assembly and the tube 49. The upper end of the spring Is also sockets loosely in the lower end of the tube 80.

Fixed to extend laterally from the upper end of the structural tube 80 is the horizontal cylindrical motor housing SI in which is axially confined a small electric motor 92, including a worm 83 on its shaft 84 and a worm wheel 85 in mesh with the worm. The worm wheel is fixed on a depending shaft 85 which is mounted in a hearing 81 on the bottom wall of the motor housing and in the upper and lower arms of the U-shaped brace 88 which is fastened to a disk 89 which is mounted on the longitudinal rods 90 and 9| which project from the motor. To eliminate unwanted axial movement of the shaft 86 tubes 92 and 93 are placed on the shaft 86. The tube 92 is located between the upper arm of the brace 88 and the top of the worm wheel 05 while the lower tube 93 extends between the lower arm of the brace 88 and the lower side of the housing 8I.

A spring-pressed latch 94 is pivoted at 95 on the brace 88 and has a hook 96 on its lower end to hook under a ledge 91 on a head 98 rising from the cap 99. A helical spring I is circumposed on the shaft 86 and expands between the lower arm of the brace 88 and the head 98.

The cap 99 and the head 98 slide on the shaft 96 under the downward tension of the spring I00, the cap comprising the disk IOI which substantially closes the opening I in the cover I3 with an annular compressible washer I02 to engage the top of the jar 30. As shown in Figure l? the cap includes the inverted tapering cup I03 adapted to enter and center itself in the mouth of the jar during the running of the shaft and the working of the cage I84 in the jar in and out of the solution I05 which half fills the jar.

The cage I94 comprises a disk 506 which has a central tubular boss I01 rising therefrom and surrounding the lower end of the shaft 85, with a cross pin I08 passing through both the boss and the shaft and riveted at both ends.

One side of the disk I08 is mutilated to define a tongue I09. The diametrically opposite part of the disk has a chordally arranged slot I I0.

Around the central portion thereof the disk I06 is cut away at four equally circumferentially spaced distances to define the truncated triangular openings shown in Figure 18 of the drawings, and to define four diametrically opposed webs III which have the major portion of the length thereof turned upwardly and longitudinally curved to define concavo-convex petalshaped vanes or blades I I2. The blades are tilted at an angle of about 45 with the horizontal to throw the solution downwardly through the triangular openings into the cage I04.

The square cage I09 comprises a frame including a rectangular upper element II i with an inside ledge I I5 to support a screen cover I I6 which is stretched on a square frame I II from opposite sides of which project positioning lugs I I8 which seat in notches H9 formed in the element II I. From the middle of the four sides of the element H4 depend L-shaped bars I20 whose feet terminate at the center of the bottom of the basket and are secured together by a button IZI. One of the bars I20 has a circular spring tongue I22 extending above the element I I4 to snap through the slot IIO in the disk I06 when the tongue I09.

of the disk has" been inserted hinge-wise into a slot I23 formed above the element I I4 in a basketwide extension projecting above the main plane of the element I I4. The tongue I22 has an inside projection I24 defining a stop against the underside of which the disk I05 engages after the disk I06 has been snapped home, so that the disk will be held assembled with the basket. The wire netting I25 in the form of a square box with open top is secured to the inner sides of the elements I20 and the element H4.

For segregating different parts in the basket a battery of two heavy screened and two fine screened cups is provided in a four-eyed frame I26 which rests upon the ledge H5, with the screen cups depending below the frame 25 and at a substantial distance above the bottom of the cage. The frame II! of the screen cover depends below the screen part of this cover so as to close the tops of the cups while the frame II'I rests on the ledge H5.

The timing of the length of the operation of the cage in the first or washing jar and in the drying chamber 2| is produced by an electric clock operated timing switch which is mounted on the base plate 5 adjacent the motor 45. The period which the clock times is that which commences when the cage reaches the bottom of the washing jar or the bottom of the drying chamber and which ends when the predetermined period of time has elapsed for the cage to remain at the bottom position. When this time period expires the other mechanism of the machine takes care of the elevating of the cage to intermediate position above the solution in the jar wherein the rotation of the cage continues a sufficient predetermined number of revolutions to throw off excess solution by centrifugal force.

The timing means comprises an ordinary electric clock motor, generally designated I21, which includes a second hand shaft I28 on which is fixed a dielectric disk I29 backed up by a metal disk I38 against which bears a brush I3I which is insulated from the clock frame as is the disk I30, the brush being mounted on the frame by a bracket I32. Backing up the insulated metal disk I30 is a dielectric disk I33 which insulates the disk I30 from the shaft and from a smaller insulated metal disk I3 3 against which bears another insulated brush I35.

The disk I39 has a cylindrical contact I36 extending forwardly through the dielectric disk I29 for engagement by contactors to be described. The smaller metal disk I30 has an elongated arcuate contact I37 extending through the disks I33, I30 and I29 and insulated from the disk I30 and exposed at the face of the disk I29 for engagement by certain contactors. With respect to the contact I36 the contact I31 is elongated in a direction of rotation of the disk to prolong the engagement of one of the contactors with the contact I31 beyond the engagement of the contactors with the contact I36, necessary because of the fact that when the clock motor is deenergized its momentum carries the disk I29 beyond the point at which deenergization of the clock motor took place and it is necessary that the position indicating light circuit remain energized beyond the deenergization of the clock motor, to indicate to the operator the position of rotation of the disk 29 with respect to the contact I36 and the contactors.

The contactors mentioned are supported in diametrically opposed. pairs in alignment and 9 insulated from a horizontal bar I29 supported from the base plate at the front of the disk I29, the outer contactors I38 and I39 being in the path of the small contact I36 and the inner contactors I46 and MI being in the path of the elongated contact I31.

The first manual operation performed to start the machine into operation consists in pressing inwardly on a button I42 (see Figure located on the outside of the casing, and which is attached to a push rod I43 whose inner end then freely engages and swings an arm I44 on the lower end of a rock shaft I45 which is mounted at upper and lower ends in a bracket I46 projecting from the sprocket chain guard and in a socket in the plate 5, respectively. The upper part of the rock shaft i 45 has a crooked arm I41 whose free end is pressed by the described movement of the shaft I45 against a fiat vertical bar I48 which is fastened at its ends (see Figure 26) across the bight of a bent switch lever I49 of the switch F, the lever having a notch I56 for engagement by a spring-pressed hooked detent I5I when the lever is in its initial position shown by dotted lines in Figure 26. The detent and the lever are pivoted on opposite sides of a support I52 which is secured to the base plate 5. When engaged with the notch the detent holds the lower part of the lever I49, and its insulated contact I53 away from the stationary insulated contact I54 on the support I52 thereby breaking the circuit of the elevator motor 12. When the lever is pushed toward the right, as seen in Figure 26, by the push rod I43 the detent not only comes free from the lever but also assists in throwing the lever over and engaging its contact I53 with the contact I54 so as to energize the motor 12.

The upperpart of the switch lever I49 is bent as shown so as to reach across the slot 41 of the outer tube of the elevator assembly so that when the inner tube and consequently the pin 56 descends, the pin 54 will cam the lever I46 back into circuit breaking position and thereby deenergize the elevator motor and stop the descent of the inner tube and the cage carried by it at the correct level.

The lower arm of the lever I49 has a projection I55 for engagement by a horizontal longitudinally spring-pressed rod I56 which is adapted to be pushed toward the left in Figure 26 against the tension of an internal spring (not shown), by the lever I51 which is pivoted on the base plate 5 at I59, when the lever I51 is inwardly displaced by a cam I59 fixed to project radially inwardly from the rotary annulus 26 into the central opening thereof. The left hand swing of the lever I51 projects the left-hand end of the rod I56 across the slot 41, so that as the pin 54 on the inner tube comes down after kicking over the switch lever. I49, the pin 54 will strike the rod I56 and tilt it downwardly.

It is to be noted that as the pin 54 descends and earns back the lever I49, the pin 50 merely passes by the lever. At the bottom of the reciprocation the pin 54 engages the cam lobe I55 on the lever I49 thereby causing the upper portion of lever I49 to move again to a position across the slot 41 as the tube 49 descends. On the upstroke of the reciprocation the pin 56 pushes the lever I49 toward the left (see Figure 26) into the cooked position shown in dotted lines in Figure 26 in which the associated switch is open.

The rod I56 is mounted in a tubular housing arm of the lever I69. Another stop I14 is located I59 which has a leg I66 pivoted .in a bracket I6I on the base plate to permit the mentioned tilting. The housing I59 constituting apart of the switchG, has a foot I62 carrying an insulated contact I63 which disengages from a companion insulated contact tilting, thereby breaking the circuit to the elevator motor 12, and thereby keeping then).- her tube and the cage in the extreme depressed position. The arm I66 is merely a stop to keep the lever I51 from falling too far toward the right. A helical spring I61 is stretched between the housing I56 and the bracket I65 to yieldably hold the housing and the rod I56 in horizontal position. In descending the pin 54 holds the rod I56 tilted downwardly as described until the clock makes its cycle and starts the elevator motor again, thereby raising the inner tube 49 and lifting the pin 54 from the rod I56 so as to release it to horizontal position. I The lever I51 is again tilted and is then held in the left hand tilted position by the radially yielding spring-pressed cam I66 which is mounted onthe annulus 26 (see Figure 12) and whose 1 operating face is angulated similarly to the cam I59, The operative engagement of the second cam I66 with the lever I51 takes place as the the machine to finish the final or drying stage when'the cam I59 trips the switch F as it pushes the lever I51. A be stopped at the top of the reciprocation of the drying stage when the pin on the arm of the.

switch D pushes into the corresponding depression in the underside of the turntable. Finally, the switch H stops the machine upon completion of the drying stage.

In the rotation of the turntable I6, means is provided whereby each successive jar will be exactly positioned with respect to the opening in the cover 13 and with respect to the axis of verticalreciprocation of the cage, through compensation for any overrunning of the turntable or of the annulus 26 due'to any mechanical and electrical imperfections in operation. This means comprises (as shown in Figure 13), a lockving assembly comprising a substantially radial lever I61 pivoted intermediate its ends at I68 to the'annulus or annular base 26' to project therebeyond to engage the appropriate one of theposts I I on the casing. The inner end of the le-; ver' I61 overlaps one arm of. a U-shaped lever I69, which is pivoted at I16 to the annulus 26,

and has its other arm overlapped by the radially inward end of a trip'lever I1I. The trip lever- [H is pivoted intermediate its ends to the annu lus 26' and projects radially outwardly beyond a cut-out I12 formed in the edge of the annulus beyond the lever I61. A stopilug I13 engaged withthe inner end of the lever I1I prevents the lever I1I from disengaging from the "adjacent outwardly of the inner end of the. lever I61 to limit swinging of the latter under the influence of spring I15or away from the upper arm lever I69.

I64 on a post I 65 on. the base plate, as a result of 'the Otherwise, the machine would A positioning spring I15 is stretched between theouter end of the lever I61 and the point I16 on the annulus 28". A second spring I'I'I is stretched between the point I16 and the interme-- diate part of the lever I69. A heavy spring I18 is stretched between the point I19 on the annulus 20-'- and the point I80 on the base plate I6 of the turntable, relative to which the annulus can turn. A trip pin I-8I for the lever Il-I rises from the base plate I6;

As the turntable rotates to a position of a succeeding jar the outer end of the lever IE! will engage the appropriate one of the posts II and the annulus 20" is thereby stopped in exact position by the engagement of the levers I61 with the lever I69, the engagement of lever I69 with lever I'H;, and the engagement of lever III with pin H3, thereby holding the lever I61 against yielding. At the same time the; base plate I6 flexibly connected to the annulus 20 only by the spring I78 is permitted to travel further than the annulus. However, the tension of the spring I18 will then return the base plate I6 to the original relation with the annulus 20 with the pin I-BI" engaging the end of the cut-out H2, the annulushavingbeen stopped as described insuch position that the appropriate jar is exactly correctly positioned with respect to the cover hole 15 and the cage. As the relative movement of the annulus 20 and base plate I8- takes place due to the drag of the plate Iii-after the motor 44 stops, the pin I8I- will strike the trip lever HI and upset the locking relationship oi' 'the levers I11; I69 and IBI so that the springs I15- and IT! can restore the levers to initial position and in the process-permit the lever- IG'I to pass the post I I so that the turntable can turn to carry the next succeeding jar into working position. As the inner end of lever IE1 is rounded; it is only necessary to make the spring I-Istronger than spring II'I'inorder that the inner end of'lever I61 may be forced past the adjacent end-of lever I69 after the latter has beenrestored to its initial position of Figure 13.

In Figure 13 is also shown the plunger I82 which is engaged anddepressed by the button I2 I on the bottom of the basket H14; The plungeris located directly under the drying chamberZI and when depressed by the descent ofthe-basket operates aswitch to be described; to deenergize the elevator motor to permit the cage to continue to' operate in depressed-drying position for a fullcycle of the clock operated switch already described; When this cycle is completed the clock switch starts the elevator motor again so asto elevate the cageout of the drying chamber after a predetermined drying period has elapsed;

On the bottom oi theturntable plate It are six equally circumferentially spaced arcuate depressions I83; one for each ofthe five jars and one for the drying chamber as shown in Fig. 12. These depressions are arranged-in an outer circle. On an inner circle is a single depression I83 which isapproximately radially aligned with the depression I83 relating to the first or washing jar. The outside circle of depressions I83-operate only the: double switch A. The single depression- I83 of the inner circle operates the remaining switches B, C and D; V

The switches A, B, C and D aremounted-onthe' base-plate 5 in suitable circumferentiallyspaced position. The B and'C switches are single actionswitches, while the A and D switches-are-doub1eaction switches; The single action switchescomprisea U-shaped frame I84 having a pivotlug- I85 (see Figures 14 and 29) on its upper-part-on which is pivoted the intermediate part of the" horizontal arm of the rocker I86, which carries a displacing pin I81 which ordinarily slides along the bottom of the turntable plate It but which rides into and out of the depression I83 as it arrives and leaves during the rotation of the turn-- table. The depending arm of the rocker I86 has a contact I88 opposed to a contact I89 on the adjacent leg of the frame I84. A spring Hill is stretched between the dependent legof the rocker and the remaining leg of the frame to move the rocker to close the-contacts when the depression I83' comes into position. Both of the single switches B and C operate in this manner.

The double action switches A- and D are similar, each consisting of a U-shaped frame I84 havingan upper pivot lug I, and a rocker I86; Here, however, the rockers have an additional dependent leg, one leg ISI being laterally projectedto carry acontact I92 related to a-contact I93 on an arm on a leg of the frame, while the straightdepending leg has alateral contact I88 opposed to a contact I89 on the remaining leg of the frame. It is obvious that the spring I99 stretched between thestraight depending leg and" the remote leg of the frame is provided for the purpose of rocking the rocker to disengage the contacts I92 and I93, which are normally engaged, and engage the contacts I88 and I89, when the displacing pin I81 can rise off the bottom of the turntable into one of the depressions.

The normally closed switch E is generally similar in structure to the single action switches but is devoid of adisplacement pin I81 and is operated open instead by the plunger rod I82 which is depressed by the descent of the basket in the drying chamber.

Another switch not already described comprises the switch H (see Figure 8) which when opened stops the elevator motor with the cage in the elevated position when the cage comes out of the drier chamber at the completion of the part cleaning operation. The switch H comprises a post I94- which rises from the base plate 5 alongside the sprocket chain andguard to almost the height thereof. A lever I95 is pivoted intermediate its ends at I96 on a pair of arms I91 projecting laterally from the post I 94'. The lower end of the lever has a contact I98'opposed toa contact I-99 onthe said post, the contacts being open until the machine is placed in operation,

when they close and open successively as the cage is reciprocated upwardly and downwardly.

A spring 289011 a pinv 20I- on the lever expands" between the lever and the upper end of the post- I94, through which the pin projects, to tension the lever I95 toward contact closing position.

The upper end ofjthe'lever'i95has a curved part' circuit'is energizedas the last jar before the drier chamber comes into position. As the cageleaves 75= the-lastjar the-heater circuit'is cut off by switch Inthe thirdposition' of the contactor assembly the heater- 13 C, the drying chamber being sufficiently heated for a predetermined time by that time to perform the drying operation as the cage is lowered into and remains in the lower part of the drying chamber, with the heater circuit cut off.

In the last or lowest position of the contactor assembly of the switch I the clock motor circuit may be closed to operate the timing means and thereby determine the point at which the elevator motor will be reenergized to raise the cage out of the heater chamber. The drying chamber has substantially beneath it a circular electrical heating element 203 which supplies the timed drying heat thereto.

structurally the switch I comprises an inverted U-shaped frame 204 secured to the base plate and having two depending insulated contacts 205 and 206, respectively, on its bight portion (see Figures 10, 11, 2'7 and 29). The legs of the frame 204'have insulation along the inner sides thereof. On the insulation of the leg 201 are the top pair of parallel contact strips 208, the second pair of contact strips 209 spaced therebelow. Spaced below the strips 209 are the pair of heater strips 2I0 and spaced below these are the clock circuit strips 2 I I.

Along the lower part of the insulation of the leg 2I2 are the parallel cage motor circuit strips 2 I 3 and 2 I 4 and between them the short strip 2 I 5. The strip 2I3 is substantially longer and depends below the strip 2I4, alongside of the short strip 2 I 5. The strips 2 I 3 and 2 I 5 provide for reversing the cage motor when the cage is in a depressed position, for the purpose of breaking up the solution before the cage resumes rotation in the usual direction preparatory to elevation of the cage from its depressed position.

The contactor assembly 2I6 (see Figure 28) comprises the inner tube pins 53 and 54 to which is fixed a vertical flat plate 2 I! having an insulated flat horizontal electrical bridge element 2 I8 on its upper end for bridging the contacts 205 and 206. Adjacent the lower end of the plate 2 I1 there project therefrom the horizontally spaced and aligned electrically connected brushes 2 I 9 and 228 for engaging the pairs of strips on the leg 20'! of the frame 204. Projecting from the opposite side of the plate 2 I1 and above the level of the brushes 2 I9 and 220 there project the brushes 22I and 222 for engaging the strips 2I4 and 2I3, respectively, on the frame leg 2I2; and the middle brush 223 for engaging the short strip 2I5. As already indicated the contactor assembly is carried up and down by the movement of the inner tube 49. Flexible conduits 224, 225 and 226 enclosing appropriate wires leading from the brushes 22!, 222, and 223 are led through the slot in the outer tube 23 into the interior of the inner tube 49 and these wires connect with a three-point plug 22'! mounted in the upper end of the inner tube.

The tubular part 80 of the cage motor assembly has a plug or socket member 229 making electrical connection with the three points of the plug 22'! (Figures 17 and 29), the member 228 having appropriate electrical connection to the cage motor 82 to run the motor in both forward and reverse directions.

The selector switch J has for its purpose to select electrically the appropriate sections of the eight different circuits of the machine to accomplish five distinct operations of the machine. On the outside of the casing is an indicator plate 229'which has thereon five radiating indicator lines, radiating to lens covered indicator bulbs 230, 23!, 232, i333 and 234, respectivelmwhichsulators 23! with circumferentially spaced con-.

tacts 238 thereon, the dual diametrically opposed spring brushes 239 to engage those contacts being fixed on the shaft 235 and insulated from each other (see Figures 23 and 24).

Operation The said five different operations of the machine mentioned above, with respect to the indicator lines, a, b, c, d and e and the handle 235 are as follows:

(a) With the handle turned from line e to coincide with indicator line a, the bulb 230 lights and the machine operates to reset itself after having been put into solution changing position wherein the cover I3 is elevated and the last jar registered with opening I5. In resetting, the cover comes down to normal position after the turntable turns so as to place the drying chamber under the cage, and when the cover is lowered the cage goes down into the drying chamber and then out again, at which stage the machine stops and is set to begin a normal cycle of washing, several successive rinses, and a drying. The bulb 230 stays it until the handle 235 is moved to some other position. Upon turning handle 235 to line a as mentioned, the same operations take place as those described with respect to the last rinsing stage, except that clock motor I2! is not energized because the cage and its motor unit is removed and therefore plunger I82 is not depressed.

. (b) The handle is moved to coincide with indicator line b when, the maching having been reset, it is desired to commence and carry through a full time complete cycle of the machine from washing to drying. In this position the bulb 23I lights and the brushes 239 are turned clockwise the distance of one contact from the positions of Figure 29.

At this time, button I42 is pushed in to close switch F, and current flows from the left line wire 242 through switch L (which has been closed), wires 269 and 26I to the lower brush 239 of the fourth disc 23? and the contact 238 engaged thereby. The current then flows through wires 265, the right hand contacts of switch D (which is in the position of Figure 29) ,wire 218, the contacts of switch F, wires I53 and 258, the contacts of switch G, wire 258, the contacts of switch E, the right hand contacts I88 and I89 of switch A, wire 233, the left hand contact of the first disc 23! engaged by the lower brush 239 of the latter, wire 2', and wire 210 to one terminal of motor I2. From the other terminal of motor I2, current flows through wires 269, 216 and 243 back to the right line wire 242, thereby completing the circuit of motor I2 and placing ,it in operation. Motor I2 then drives chain 56 to complete elevation of tube 49 and the cage and its driving motor unit which are carried thereby. At this time, pin 59raises the cover I3 so as to free it from the receptacles 3!} and allow ,movement of the turn table I6. When the cover I3 is raised, the contactor assembly 2I6 is also contacts 205 and 286 and thereby place motor 44 in operation to move the turn table so as to bring the first receptacle 39 into registry with the opening 15 of cover 13. Upon engagement of element 2I8 with contacts 205 and 296 and engagement of brushes 2I9 and 220 with strips 288, current flows from the left line wire 242 through switch L, wires 28D and 26I, the lower brush 239 of the fourth disc 231, wire 265, the left hand contacts of switch D, wire I53, switches G and E, the right hand contacts of switch A, wire 283, the lower brush 239 of the first disc 231, and wire 212 to contact 265, plate 2I8, contact 266, wire 213, upper brush 239 of the first disc 231, wires 252 and 253, plates 208, and wires 261 and 268 to one terminal of motor 44. From the other terminal of motor 44, current flows through wires 218 and 243 to the right line wire 242, completing the circuit of motor 44 so that the latter drives the turn table as previously mentioned. As soon as the turn table starts to turn, the pin I81 rides out of the adjacent depression I83 so as to open the right hand contacts of switch A and close the left hand contacts thereof. Although this opens the circuit of motor 12 at one point, such circuit is closed across the strips 208 so that said motor 12 continues to run. Also, while disengagement of plate 2I8 from contacts 285 and 266 has opened the circuit of motor 44 at one point, closing of the left hand contacts of switch A has closed it at another point so that the motor 44 also continues to run. Riding of brushes 2I9 and 228 downwardly off of strips 298 then opens the circuit of motor 12 to stop lowering of the cage and cover 13, thereby allowing the turn table to continue moving until the first receptacle 38 has been brought into registry with opening 15. When the first receptacle has been brought into registry with opening 15, the pin I81 of switch A will have entered'the adjacent depression I83, thereby opening the circuit of motor 44 by permitting separation of the left hand contacts of switch A and allowing the receptacle to remain in such registered position with respect to opening 15. In addition, entry of the pin I81 in the depression allows the right hand contacts of switch A to close the circuit of motor 12, thereby causing the tube 49 and the cage motor unit to resume lowering so that the cover 13 lowers onto the receptacles 38 and the cage passes downwardly through opening 15 and into the registered receptacle. As the cage approaches its lower limit of movement, cam I66 forces lever I51 of switch G inwardly so as to force pin I56 across slot 41, whereupon pin 54 depresses the adjacent end of pin I56 and separates contacts I63 and I64 so as to stop the motor 12 to allow the cage to remain in the wash ing solution. Prior to this stopping of motor 12, brushes 22I and 222 will have engaged strips 2 I3 and 2M to close the circuit of motor 82 and thereby cause rotation of the cage in one direction. When the circuit of motor 82 is thus closed, current flows from the left line wire 242 through switch L, wires 268 and 26!, on 239 of the fourth disc 231, wire 262, right contacts of switch D, wire 218, switch F, wire I53, wire 256, strip 2l4, brush 22 I, and wire 226 to one terminal of motor 82. The current then returns from another terminal of motor 82 through wire 224, brush 222, strip 2I3, wires 214 and 243 to the right line wire 242. As the basket continues to lower, brush 22I rides on of strip 2I4 and brush 223 rides onto strip 2I5, reversing motor 82 so as to rotate the cage in an opposite direction for a more efficient washing action. This happens just prior to tilting of pin I56 by pin 54. The circuit of motor 82, when reversed, is the same except that the current flows to a third terminal of the motor through wire 225 instead of through wire 226. When the motor 82 is reversed, brushes 2I9 and 229 ride onto strips 2II to close the circuit of clock motor I21 so that the latter rotates disc I30 until contacts I36 and I31 move in an anticlockwise direction from the position of Figure 15 back to the same point. In doing this, the contacts I36 and I31 engage contactors I39 and MI when the washing operation has taken place for a given period of time, thereby closing the circuit or motor 12 to cause the cage and its motor unit to start upwardly and the lamp 23! to light again. This causes pin 54 to rise and allow the contact I63 to engage contact I64 so that the circuit of motor 12 will be closed at this point even though it is opened at another point by drifting of contact I36 slightly past contactor I39. When contacts I36 and I31 engage contactors I39 and MI, current flows from the left line wire 242 through switch L, wires 269 and 26I, lower arm of the fourth disc 231, wire 262, brush I35, disc I34, contactor I4I, wire MI and lamp 23! to the right line wire 242. The current also flows from wire 262 through wire 263, brush I3I, disc I38, contact I36, contactor I39, wire I39, upper arm 239 of the third disc 231, and wires 21! and 210 to one terminal of motor 12. From the other terminal of motor 12, the current flows through wires 269, 216 and 243 to the right line wire 242. When contact I36 leaves contactor I39 and contact I63 engages contact I64 of switch G, the current flows as described when starting the machine by pushing button I42. When brushes 2I'9 and 220 rode onto strips 2 to close the circuit of clock motor I21, current flowed from leftline wire 242 through wires 26D and 26I, the engaged contacts of the fourth disc 231, wire 266, switch B, the engaged contacts of the third disc 231, wire 219, brushes 219 and 228, strips 2, and wire 211 to one side of motor I21. From the other side of motor I21, current flowed through wire 243 to the right line wire 242. Shortly after the cage starts to rise and while it is still in the solution, motor 82 is reversed again by passing of brush 223 ofi of strip 2I5 and riding of brush 22I onto strip 214, thereby enhancing the washing action. The speed of motor 82 is faster in the partly elevated position of the cage and in the completely lowered position thereof, because it has a lower R. P. M. when initially reversed. The cage continues to rise and pass out of the washing solution and, due to the higher speed of motor 82, the solution is effectively thrown ofi the washed parts and from the cage while still in the receptacle so that little dirty washing solution remains to mix with the solution used in the subsequent rinsing operation. Upon further upward movement of the cage, brushes 22I and 222 leave strips 2I3 and 2I4, thereby stopping motor 82 and rotation of the cage after the cage passes out of the washing solution into the upper portion of the receptacle 30. Still further upward movement causes the cage to enter the cup I03 and thereby raises the cap 99 as said cage passes upwardly through opening 15 above the cover 13. This is followed by engagement of pin 59 with cover 13 to raise the latter, after which plate 2I8 engages contacts 205 and 206 to close the circuit of motor 44, so that it I0.-

15-tates the turn table and brings the next recep- 17 tacle 30 into registry with the opening 15 of cover 13. This cycle of operation is then automatically repeated with respect to all of the remaining rinsing receptacles, except that the cage moves up and down continuously anddoes not remain in its lowermost position for a period of time, because the cam I56 only functions during the Washing stage. During the last rinsing stage, the pin I81 of switch C has entered the depression I83 so as to allow this switch to close the circuit of heater 293 at one point. Upon wering of the cage during this stage, brushes 2|9 and 220 engage strips 2H) to close the heater circuit at another point and thereby complete the circuit so that the heater is energized. The heater circuit remains closed until brushes 2i9 and 220 ride off of strips 2H1 during downward and upward movement of the cage, the circuit being opened to render the heater inoperative as the cage rises during completion of the last rinsing stage. Suflicient heat remains for the subsequent drying stage after the heat is turned 01f. When switch C is thus closed and brushes 2I9 and 22!] thus engage strips 2| 0, the current flows from left line wire 242 through switch L, wires 260 and 26I, lower arm 239 of the fourth disc 231, wire 265, left contacts of switch D, wires 259 and IE3, right strip 2Ill, brushes 223 and 2I9, left strip 2Ill, wire 28I, contacts of switch C and wire 282 to one side of heater 233. From the other side of heater 203, the current flows through wires 216 and 243 to the right line wire 242. When the cage is completely elevated and the cover 13 is raised at the end of the last rinsing stage, plate 2Is engages contacts 295 and 206 to close the circuit of motor 44 as previously described and thereby cause movement of the turn table so as to bring the drying chamber 2| into registry with the opening of cover I3, the stopping of the turn table in proper position being effected as before outlined with respect to the washing stage. This is followed by lowering of cover I3 and downward movement of the cage through opening 15 into the drying chamber in the same way as these acts took place with respect to the first or washing solution receptacle an. The cage is caused to remain in the drying chamber for a period of time at this stage, because the cage depresses the plunger I82 so as to o en Switch E and thereb stop the motor I2. As the cage a roaches its lower limit of movement in this stage, brushes M9 and 225 bridge strips 2II to close the circuit of the clock motor 7 I21. The timing means which includes this clock motor closes the circuit of motor 12 after the drying operation has taken place for a given period of time, whereupon the cage and its motor unit are elevated, but the cover 13 is not raised, the operation of motor 12 occurring exactly as described after completion of the washing operation. Just before the cage reaches its uppermost limit of movement, link 52 actuates lever I95 of switch H so as to separate contact I93 from contact I99 and thereby stop motor 12. The cleaned and dried parts are then removed from the cage, and the machine is then back to its original condition ready for a new set of washing, rinsing and drying operations. When the brushes 2I9 and 228 last bridged the strips 2i I, the current flowed from left line wire 242 through switch L, wires 250 and 26I, lower arm 239 of the fourth disc 231, wires 262 and 264, right contacts of switch D, wire 213', lower arm 23'! of the third disc 231; the next to the lowest left contact 238 of the latter disc, wire 219, right strip 2i I, brushes 225 and 2I9, left strip 2, and wire 211 to one side of motor I21. From the other side of motor I21, the current flowed through wire 243 to right line wire 242.

(c) When the handle is moved to coincide with line 0, part-time washing operation is produced, as well as lighting of the bulb 232, the washing operation having approximately half or some other desired duration less than full time. Lighting of bulb 232 occurs because current flows from left line wire 242 through wires 269 and 26L upper arm 239 of the fourth disc 231, wires 248 and 241, and lamp 232 to right line wire 242. Turning of handle 235 to line 0 breaks connection of brush I39 with the upper arm 239 of the third disc 231 and establishes connection of brush I38 therewith so that engagement of contact I 36 with brush :38 closes the circuit of motor, 12 to efiect elevation of the cage upon partial rotation of disc I 30 instead of upon complete rotation thereof. Obviously, this provides the part-time or shorter period of washing, which will be sufficient if the parts are in such condition that they can be cleaned in the shorter period. The full time in the drying operation is always necessary and occurs accordingly regardless whether the machine is set for full or part-time washing operation.

It is to be noted that if the handle 235 is left in the 0 position after a part-time run, the next run will automatically be a full-time run, unless the handle is turned to the '1) position. To tell from then on whether the succeeding run will be part-time or full time it is necessary to note whether one or both of the lights 23I and 232 are lit. If both are lit the run will bezfull-time without changing the position of the'handle or if only one light is lit the run willbepart-time, so that it is necessary to appropriately'change the position of the handle to predetermine the run desired.

(d) In the 01 position of the handle the machine operates in the wash position.until the handle 235 is turned to some other position. When the handle 235 is in this position, the lower arm 239 of the third disc 231 is on'a contact 238 not connected to wire 219, so that clock motor I 21 is not energized and there is no timing of the washing operation. It is thus obvious, that handle 235 must be moved to position b or position 0 in order to again time the washing operation.

(e) If after completion of a run of the machine with handle 235 in any of the other positions (the machine having come to a stop in the drying position) it is desired to change dirty solution in the jars, the handle is turned to the 6 position, thereby causing the cover 13 to rise and stop at top position, thereby exposing the jars for removal and replacement. In this position, current flows from left line wire 242, through wires 26B and ESL engaged contacts of the fourth disk 231, wire 234, lamp 234, and wire 243 to the right line wire 242, so that lamp 234 is lighted. When handle 235 is turned to coincide with indicator line e current flows from left line wire 242 through wire 260 to wire 25I, through engaged contacts of the second disc 231, wire 254, brushes 2I9 and 22B and strips 209, wire 209, engaged contacts of the first disc 231, wires 21I and 210 to one side of motor 12. From the other side of motor 12, current flows through wires 2E9, 215 and 243 to the right line wire 242. This places motor 12 in operation to complete elevation of the cage motor unit and simultaneously raise cover 13. When this is done, brushes 2 I 9 and 220 ride off of strips 299 and stop the motor '52. The

switch button 2 25 which is exposed through the indicator plate 22 9, is then pushed in to close the switch K, which closes the turntable motor circuit. As a result, as long as the button 248 is held in, the turntable will keep revolving. Releasing the button Zdil stops the turntable at the desired point in rotation so that the desired jar can be removed through the opening in the cover I3 for replacement or for hanging the solution therein. When button 2 3i) is thus pushed in, current flows from left line wire 2 32 through wire 26%}, engaged contacts of the second disc 23?, wire 26?, through switch K, and wire 2% to one side of motor id. From the other side of motor 54, current flows through wires 215 and its to the right line wire M2. As soon as motor it is thus started, pin I87 rides out of the adjacent depression I83 so as to close switch A whereby this motor will continue to run even though button 4c is released, until pin 15"! rides into the next depression 183 to open the left side of switch A and stop motor ti when the first or washing solution receptacle 3 is registered with the open ing 15 of cover 73. When button 258 is released, current flows from left line wire 2 52 and wire 26% through engaged contacts of the second disc 231,

wires L I53 and 25?, and left contacts of switch A to one side of motor it, the current flowing from the other side of motor ilt to right line wire 252 by way of Wires zland 2343. Upon removal of the cage motor unit, the registered washing solution receptacle 3;! may removed from the machine, and the operation may be repeated to gain access to and eifect removal of the successive remaining rinsing solution receptacles. As previously mentioned, rack bar 29 is elevated to raise and effect removal of the receptacles through the opening T5 of cover 13.

A toggle 24! operating the switch L is provided on the side of the machine casing to cut on and off the supply current from the supply lines 242 to operate the machine.

Reference to the diagram of Figure 29 shows the operative electrical connections of the various switches and motors, including the clock. One side of the current supply 242 is connected by the wires 243 and 275 to the long contact 2&3 on one side 2K2 of the switchboard 1. One side of the lamps 238, 23!, 232, 233 and 23s are also connected to the wire 243. The remaining side of the lamp 239 is connected by the wire 2% with the first one of the contact points 238 on the fourth disk 23! of the multiple switch J. The remaining side of the lamp 23! is connected by the wire 245 to the clock switch contact It! and to the branch 2% leading to the second contact 2380f the mentioned dish. The remaining side of the lamp 232 is connected by the wire 25? with the contact kit of the clock switch and by the branch 248 with the third contact point on the said disk 23?. The wire 2 39 connects the remaining side of the lamp 233 with the fourth contact point 238 on the said disk. The remaining side of the lamp 23d is connected by the wire 234 with the top or first left hand contact 233 of the fourth disk 23?. The contact 53 of the switch F is connected by wire E53 with branch wires 25!, 252, 253, 25 i, 255, 255, 25?, 253 and 259 leading therefrom and connecting respectively with one of the spring brushes 239 on the second disk of the switch J, the contactor 23%! of the first disk, the right hand contact strips 235i and 210 of the switchboard I, the upper and lower contact strips 2H5 and 255 of the switchboards opposite side, the contact I93 of the switch A, the contact 55 of the switch G, the contact 198 of the switch H, and the lower contact of the switch D.

The blade side of the switch L is connected by the wire 2% with the lower right hand point 238 of the second disk of the switch J, and with wire 26! which connects the contacts of the second and fourth disks of the switch J. The second, third and. fourth left hand points or" the said fourth disk are all connected to the wire 252 which connects with the brush I35 of the time switch. A branch 263 connects the wire 262 with the contactor of the time switch. To the left of the wire 263 branches 264 and 265 connect the wire 252 with the corresponding rocker contacts of the main elevator switch D, and to the left of the wire 265 the wire 265 connects the wire 262 with the contactor of the third disk of the rotary switch J through switch B.

The upper left point of the second disk of the switch J is connected by the wire 25? with one side of the switch K whose remaining side is connected to the left hand contact strip 288 on the switchboard I. A branch wire 268 connects the wire '26? to the left of the switch K with the rocker contact 192 of the switch A. A branch from the wire 258 connects with one side of the motor '44, whose remaining side is connected by the wire 2% with one side of the motor 12. The remaining side of the motor 72 is connected by the wire 2H3 with a wire 2' which connects the contactor 239 of the third disk or" the switch J with the contactor of the first disk, A branch wire 272 connects the wire 2?! with the contact 225 of the switchboard I. A wire 21-3 leads from all of the right hand points on the first disk of the switch J, except the lowermost point, to the companion contact 206.

The switchboard contact strip 213 is connected by a wire 2'55 which joins the wire 253 at the junction 215, from which the wire 21% leads to the wire 259 and to one side of the electrical heater 2 .33. One side of the electric clock motor I2! is connected to the wire 2 53 with the remaining side connected to the wire 27? which leads to the lower left contact strip 2!! of the switch board I. The switch B has its stationary contact connected to wire 2%, and its movable contact is connected to motor :27 through engaged contacts of the third disk 23's, wire 239, bridged contacts 2i i, and wire 2'. Wire 218 leads from the right hand stationary contact of the switch D to the stationary contacts of the switches H and A wire 28! connects the left hand strip 2!!) of the switchboard I to the rocker contact of the switch C, whose stationary contact is connected by the wire 282 with the remaining side of the heater 263.

The terminals of the constant speed cage rotating motor 82 are connected through the three wire plug 22? with the contacts 221, 222, and 223 of the contactor assembly 218. All but one of the left-hand contacts 238 of the first disk of the rotary switch J are connected by the wire 283 with the stationary contact of the switch A.

It is to be observed that the switches B, C and D are operated by the inside single depression 583', whereas the outside track of six depressions 133 operate the switch A. The switch E is operated by the plunger E32.

It is to be understood that the scope of the invention is not limited to the precise arrangement

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US2678052 *Oct 12, 1948May 11, 1954E & J Swigart CompanyWatch and like parts washing machine
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US4924890 *May 16, 1986May 15, 1990Eastman Kodak CompanyMethod and apparatus for cleaning semiconductor wafers
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/58.00R, 134/77, 192/139, 968/745, 134/33
International ClassificationG04D3/00, G04D3/08, B65G49/04, B65G49/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65G49/0463, G04D3/086
European ClassificationB65G49/04B4A4A4, G04D3/08B2