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Publication numberUS2560215 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 10, 1951
Filing dateDec 5, 1946
Priority dateNov 1, 1945
Publication numberUS 2560215 A, US 2560215A, US-A-2560215, US2560215 A, US2560215A
InventorsMarinus Christensen
Original AssigneeMarinus Christensen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Protection mask against poisonous gases and dust
US 2560215 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 10, 1951 M. CHRISTENSEN PROTECTION MASK AGAINST FOISONOUS GASES AND DUST ,"ii n w I I IHHIHI iiii i Filed Dec. 5. 1946 Fig.1.

Patented July 10, l95l so orn-ca i 7 2,560,215

, recreation MaSKAG-Anv'srsPmsoNoUs- GASES AND nusr lVI ai'i nusC liri'stefisen, Brorup, Denmark Applicatign pecember 5, 194-6, sem -No. 71 1,20: In Denmark November 1,- 1945 sedan 1, Public Law 690', August 8, 1946 Patent expires Novemsi r, 1965' r r 1 r This invention relates to protection masks ag'a'inst poi'sono'us'gases and dust. 7

35 many kinds of work, such as spray-painting with celluloseenamels, the worker is in the risk of respiratin'g poisonous gases and dust which g' ravely enthreaten his health. Several attempts have been made to overcome this inconvenience, such as providing the worker" with a mask-comprising a filter through which the respiration air is filtered so that the poisonous gases and dust are removed. sue-n vmask, however, makes breathing difiicult and is never wholly effective because the filte'r'bcGms successively obstructed and has to be cleaned or exchanged. It has also been attempted to exhaust th'e pdisdfidfis'g'a'fses and dust from the place, where tliy al e severoped, by providing an exhausting duct, but such measures are only applicablein special cases; and they cannot be utilized byspraying apparatuses for poisonous liquids, the vapoursfrom such liquids diffusing rapidly into the surrounding air which the worker must breathe; The said protectionmasks also have, the drawback that they restrict the field of vision, of the worker because he ha-s'to look through windows in the mask;

One object of this invention is to provide a protection mask for the purpesespecified which does not require the use of-afilter and" which does not impede the breathing of the user.

Another object is to provide a protection mask which will give the user an unrestricted view, as if he Wore no mask at all.

Still another object is to provide a protection mask which is very simple and inexpensive in manufacture, while still oifering the user an effective and reliable protection against poisonous gases and dust.

A further object of the invention is to provide a mask for the purpose-specified by means of which the user is constantly supplied with fresh air, free from contaminations.

Still another object is to provide a protection mask which allows the user to speak with his companions without the necessity of removing the mask.

The invention will be described in detail hereinafter, reference being had to the accompanying drawing, in which Fig. 1 is a vertical sectional view of a mask in accordance with this invention,

Fig. 2 is a bottom plan View of the same, and

Fig. 3 illustrates how the mask is strapped to the users cap or forehead.

Briefly spoken, the principle of the invention resides in that means are strapped or otherwise i'ela'ims. (01. 128-145) secured" to the" forehead or cap of'the user, by

which a'constant streamer fresh air is blown substantially vertically down in front the users .face so as to constitute aninvisible curtainpr the flange? there is an approximately vertio rim a strap- '9 or the like by of which the mask can be secu'f'eii' to a cap'of ordinary pattern.

the part I'll s provided'with an ups *ndi'ng rim' foul air atthisf placd; The sl6tl3 suitably be" of equal width over the-whole ofitslength.

The lower part It is, at a place about 6 mm. behind the slot l3, provided with a tubular nozzle I5 which may conveniently be detachably secured so as to be capable of replacement with another one of greater or smaller bore. The space [6 between the upper and lower parts of the mask is connected through a hose I! with a compressor or other compressed-air supply from which compressed air is fed to the said space so as to blow out, part through the slot l3 to constitute an air jet screen l8 surrounding the workers face, and part through the nozzle I5 to constitute a separate air jet l9 directed towards the 'workers nose and mouth behind the air jet screen i8. As shown in the drawing, a manually adjustable valve 22 is inserted in the hose H at a suitable place thereof, by means of which valve the pressure within the chamber may be adjusted according to requirements.

In Fig. 3, the protection mask is shown strapped to a cap '20 on the head of .a worker. The screen 2| of the cap is situated below the lower part In of the mask, but the slot l3 as well as the nozzle l5 are situated so far beyond the edge of the cap screen that the air jets are not impeded thereby. The cap screen will at the same time protect the workers eyes against draft.

The mask may be made of metal, preferably aluminium or an aluminium alloy, or any other suitable material, such as plastics. The mask is inexpensive in manufacture, comfortable in use and affords absolute safety.

If the mask is made of castings it may be convenient to provide the upper part as well as the lower one with transverse partitions situated within the chamber I6 and bracing the two parts relative to each other.

In use it is recommendable to heat the compressed air conveniently in order to prevent excessive cooling of the users face. For this purpose an electric heating member 23 may, for example, be mounted within the compressed-air chamber.

I claim:

1. A device for the protection against poisonous gases and dust comprising in combination a receptacle; means for securing said receptacle to a persons forehead; means for connecting said receptacle to a source of compressed air; jet means associated with said receptacle and extending in a continuous arcuate line around the wearers face substantially from ear to ear and a nozzle arranged in the bottom of said receptacle within the concavity of said continuous arcuate line formed by said jet means, the said nozzle being directed toward the wearers nose and mouth so as to pass an additional stream of air thereto.

2. A device for the protection against poisonous gases and dust comprising in combination a receptacle of a length and form to extend :around a persons face substantially from ear to ear; means for securing said receptacle to the forehead of the wearer; means for connecting said receptacle to a source of compressed air; and a continuous arcuate slot provided in the bottom of said receptacle, the said slot being directed substantially parallel to the wearers face so as to pass a transversely continuous stream of air downward and parallel to the wearers face.

3. A device for the protection against poisonous gases and dust comprising in combination a receptacle of a length and form to extend around a persons face substantially from ear to ear;

means for securing said receptacle to the forehead of the wearer; means for connecting said receptacle to a source of compressed air; a continuous arcuate slot provided in the bottom of said receptacle, the said slot being directed substantially parallel to the wearers face so as to pass a transversely continuous stream of air downward and parallel to the wearers face; and a nozzle arranged in the bottom of said receptacle within the concavity of said arcuate slot, the said nozzle being directed toward the wearers nose and mouth so as to pass an additional stream of air thereto.

4. A device for the protection against poisonous gases and dust comprising in combination a rea persons face substantially from ear to ear;

meansfor securing said receptacle to the forehead of the wearer; means for connecting said receptacle to a source of compressed air; a continuous arcuate slot provided in the bottom of said receptacle, the said slot being directed substantially parallel to the wearers face so as to pass a transversely continuous stream of air downward and parallel to the wearers face; and a nozzle detachably arranged in the bottom of said receptacle Within the concavity of said arcuate slot, the said nozzle being directed toward the wearers nose and mouth so as to pass an additional stream of air thereto.

MARINUS CHRISTENSEN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,129,619 Zapf Feb. 23, 1915 1,646,103 Patrick Oct. 18, 1927 2,032,101 Sullivan Feb. 25, 1936 2,039,234 Malcolm L Apr. 28, 1936 2,402,820 Kitchen June 25, 1946 2,410,593 Wright Nov. 5, 1946 2,469,273 Parker May 3, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 67,983 7 Denmark Nov. 22, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1129619 *Jul 10, 1914Feb 23, 1915 Inhaling system.
US1646103 *Feb 16, 1927Oct 18, 1927Patrick Byron OCompressed-air protective shield
US2032101 *Feb 20, 1935Feb 25, 1936Sullivan William DFume and dust eliminator
US2039234 *Jan 29, 1934Apr 28, 1936Robert MalcomRespiratory mask
US2402820 *Sep 26, 1942Jun 25, 1946Kitchen William HWelder's mask
US2410593 *Sep 4, 1945Nov 5, 1946Charlie WrightRespiratory spray hood
US2469273 *Aug 22, 1944May 3, 1949Parker Charles MWelding mask attachment
DK67983A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2882894 *Feb 13, 1956Apr 21, 1959Fahey Floyd JHood
US3068865 *Mar 1, 1961Dec 18, 1962Laszlo SteveAir supply and fire extinguishing helmet
US3881478 *Jun 13, 1974May 6, 1975Donaldson Co IncHard hat air curtain
US4369782 *May 15, 1981Jan 25, 1983Mcgee TerrillEyewashing apparatus
US4752974 *Dec 4, 1986Jun 28, 1988Shigematsu Works Co., Ltd.Air-feed type dust protective helmet
US7036502Apr 7, 2003May 2, 2006Joseph ManneAir curtain device
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/200.28, D24/110.1
International ClassificationA62B18/00
Cooperative ClassificationA62B18/003
European ClassificationA62B18/00B