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Publication numberUS2560400 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 10, 1951
Filing dateSep 18, 1946
Priority dateSep 18, 1946
Publication numberUS 2560400 A, US 2560400A, US-A-2560400, US2560400 A, US2560400A
InventorsAbrahamson Charles M
Original AssigneeAll Steel Equipment Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Desk
US 2560400 A
Images(7)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 10, 19511 c. M. ABRAHAMSON DESK Filed Sept. 18, 1946 7 Sheets-Sheet l July 10, 1951 c. M. ABRAHAMSON DESK '7 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 18, 1946 Jufiy 10, 1951 C. M. ABRAHAMSON DESK 7 Sheet s-Sheet 5 Filed Sept. 18, 1946 &

July 10, 1951 Filed Sept. 18, 1946 C. M. ABRAHA MSON DESK 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 C. M. ABRAHAMSON July 10, 1951 DESK 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Sept. 18, 1946 my dmzwm Patented July 10, 1951 DESK Charles M. Abrahamson, Aurora, Ill., assignor to All-Steel Equipment Inc., a

Illinois corporation of Application September 18, 1946, Serial No. 697,760

This invention relates to desk construction and more particularly to a knockdown pedestal type desk suitable for general office work.

The principal object of this invention is to provide a metal desk which is convenient to make and inexpensive to manufacture; which i capable of shipment in a semi-knockdown form, yet is readily re-assembled; which has interchangeable tops of different sizes so that the same pedestal unit or units can be used for both clerical and executive type desks, and which is light in weight and attractive to the eye.

In large organizations particularly, the current requirements for desks may vary considerably from time to time and it is extremely convenient to have a knockdown type of desk which may be stored in a minimum of space when not in use, and which may be equipped with interchangeable desk tops of difierent sizes t suit the particular need. Desks of this type are becoming more and more popular because of their versatility and the desk constitutin the present invention wholly satisfies those requirements.

More specifically it is among the objects of the present invention to provide a new and improved knockdown pedestal type desk having among others the following features:

1. The component parts can be assembled and disassembled quickly and easily without requiring special tools or special skill.

2. Interchangeable desk tops of different sizes are provided which may be removably affixed to the pedestal type structure.

' 3. The desk tops are of light weight reinforced hollow nested pan construction, giving them exceptional rigidity.

4. The desk top has rounded corners of special construction which facilitate assembly and give the desk a nice appearance.

5. The desk top is provided with a continuous molding made up of straight extruded sections along the four sides of the top which interfit with molded corner caps to give the desk a finished appearance.

6. The pedestal skeleton is enclosed by pedestal side members and an integral back and bottom member which are formed for ready attachment to the pedestal skelton, which cover the pedestal skelton and define the drawer openings, and which are formed of components so embossed that when assembled the lines of juncture are substantially concealed giving a smooth finished appearance.

7. The pedestal pontoons are of simplified construction, yet are sturdy and strong.

3 Claims. 312194) 8. The overall construction is of minimum weight, consistent with strength, and presents a pleasing appearance. 1

These and other objects of my invention will become apparent from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the attached drawings, in which Fig. 1 is an exploded perspective of the desk as viewed from the left rear and in which the desk drawers are omitted and the desk top is shown broken away in part;

Fig. 2 is a front elevational view of the desk, assembled, and shows in dotted outline the overhanging of an oversized desk top;

Fig. 3 is an end elevational view of the desk, assembled, and shows in dotted outline the overhanging of an oversize desk top;

' Fig. 4 is a plan view of the desk top, looking down on it from above, in which the linoleum top covering and the top pan construction, upon which the linoleum is placed, has been omitted, in part, to reveal the desk top reinforcement construction;

Fig. 5 is a plan view of an alternate desk top construction preferably used when a larger desk top is required and in which the linoleum top covering and the top pan construction, upon which the linoleum is placed, are broken away in part to reveal the desk top reinforcement construction; 7

Fig. 6 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 66 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 1--1 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a sectional view taken on the line ii8 of Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 is a perspective view of a portion of the desk top corner with the sub-top being shown as spaced from the filler top, and in which the sub-top is broken away in part to reveal the edge 7 construction;

Fig. 15 is a cross-sectional view on the line I5-l 5 of Fig. 13 showing the moldin corner cap assembled to the desk top;

Fig. 16 shows a molding corner cap retaining member;

Fig. 17 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line l'!-l1 of Fig. 2 with top and drawers omitted;

Fig. 18 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line I8-l8 of Fig. 17;

Fig. 19 is a plan view of pedestal;

Fig. 20 is a perspective view of a front upper corner portion of the pedestal;

Fig. 21 is a perspective view of a portion of the front lower corner reinforcing construction of the pedestal;

Fig. 22 is a perspective view of an upper rear corner portion of the pedestal;

Fig. 23 is a layout of the metal side before bending; and

Fig. 24 shows the rounded metal corner after bending,

To facilitate an understanding of the various novel features of the embodiments of my invention which I have illustrated in the drawings, topic headings are employed to identify parts of the detailed description applicable to these various features.

Knockdown arrangement The term knockdown" as used in the specification and claims refers to a construction which can be easily assembled or disassembled at the point of use. While relatively speaking, all parts of a desk could be made readily separable from each other, there is a practical limit to which this may be carried to permit rapid assembly of the component parts at the point of use and also to permit certain component parts to be constructed as units of permanent form. With this in mind, and referring to Fig. 1, I have chosen the readily separable units to be the desk tops 20, pedestals 2| and 22 and the knee space panel 23. The term knee space refers, of course, to the space bounded by the pedestals, desk top and the rear plate connecting the two pedestals together. This latter plate is the knee space panel 23.

Each pedestal has adjacent the rear edge of the pedestal side facing the knee space a series of spaced aligned openings. Thus, in pedestal 22 spaced openings 24 are provided adjacent the rear edge of pedestal side member 25. The knee space panel 23 has substantially right angle flanges 26 and 21 at the sides thereof which face toward the knee space. Each of these flanges is provided with a series of spaced aligned openings which, for the respective flanges, match the openings at the rear of the pedestal sides. Thus, flange 21 has the spaced aligned openings 28 which match the openings 24. With this construction, when the knee space panel is placed between the pedestals and the pedestals are moved toward each other until they abut against the knee space panel, the respective openings in the knee space panel and pedestals can be aligned so that bolts can be passed therethrough to detachably connect the parts together.

The pedestal sides have inturned substantially horizontal flanges at the tops thereof. With reference to Fig. 1, sides 29 and 30 of the pedestal 2| are provided with flanges 3| and 32. Each of these flanges has openings therein, such as openings 33 and 34, in flange 3| and openings 35 and 36 in flange 32. Pedestal 22 is similarly constructed.

The desk top is provided with openings through the bottom thereof which, when the desk top is placed in position over the pedestals, match up with the openings in the substantially horizontal flanges at the tops of the pedestal sides. In the desk top construction shown in Fig. 1 the reinforcing Z-bars have attached thereto, at appropriate points, integrally threaded nuts held by nut retainers and these nuts receive the threaded bolts used to couple the desktop to the pedestals. For example, the upturned flange 31 of the desk top bottom pan 38 is broken away at 39 and 40 to reveal nut retainer members 4| and 42, each of which retains an internally threaded nut, mounted on the bottom flange of Z-bar 43. For purposes of reference. the openings in the nuts held by nut .retainers 4| and 42 are identified as 44 and 45.

The openings 44 and 45 are spaced apart the same distance as the openings 33 and 34 so that when the desk top is placed in position over the desk pedestals, opening 44 will match up with opening 33 and opening 45 will match up with opening 34. Similarly, certain of the longitudinal Z-bars 46 have mounted thereon internally threaded nuts held by nut retainers. Thus, nut retainers 41 and 48 are shown mounted on the indicated bottom flanges of longitudinal Z-bars 46. These nut retainers retain internally threaded nuts, the openings of which are indicated at 49 and 50. The openings 49 and 59 are so positioned that, when the desk top is placed in position over the desk pedestals, opening 49 will match up with opening 35 and opening 50 will match up with opening 36, The construction at the other end of the desk top 20 is the same so that this end of the desk can be coupled to pedestal 22. Obviously, when the top is positioned over the desk pedestals so that the openings in the pedestal side flanges coincide with the internally threaded openings in the nuts retained within the desk top, threaded bolts can be passed through the pedestal side flanges and threaded into the nuts retained in the desk top to detachably secure the desk top to the pedestals.

When a larger size desk top is used which overhangs the pedestals at the sides and rear of the desk, the nut retainers, and nuts retained thereby, are "positioned within the desk top in from the rear edge and sides thereof sufficiently so that the nut openings will match up with the openings in the pedestal side flanges. For example, in the desk top construction shown in Fig. 5, wherein flanged channel members are used to reinforce the desk top, the nuts and nut retainers are positioned for connecting the desk top to one pedestal, at 5|, 52, 53 and 54. Re-

ferring to Fig. 6, this positioning is in the valleys of flanged channel members 55 and 56. In this arrangement the edge 5'! is the rear edge of the top desk; i. e., the edge which overhangs at the rear of the desk. For the pedestals illustrated in Fig. 1, the threaded openings at 5|, 52., 53 and 54 would match up with the openings in the pedestal side flanges 58 and 59 of pedestal 22. Thus, the internally threaded opening at 5| would match up with the opening 60 in flange 59 and the internal threaded opening at 52 would match up with the opening 6! in flange 58. Likewise, the threaded openings at 53 and 54 match up with the openings in the pedestal side flanges at the forward part of pedestal 22; i. e., the openings corresponding in position to the openings 35 and 33 shown for pedestal 2|.

In assembling the desk top, pedestals and knee space panel, the top is first placed underside up, preferably on a pair of horses or a bench. On

top are placed the right-hand and left hand" pedestals, their drawers removed, at their respective ends of the inverted table top, with the drawer openings up andthe open top of the pedestals toward the assemblers, the distance between the pedestals being slightly greater than the length of the knee space panel 23. The knee space panel is inserted between the pedestals, flush side down, the pedestals are moved toward the knee space panel until they abut it, and the openings 28 in the knee space panel are aligned with the corresponding openings 24 in the pedestal sides 25 and 30. Bolts are passed through these openings and tightened to retain these parts securely together. Following this, the assembly, consisting of the two pedestals and the knee space panel, is slid slightly to the rear, away from the assemblers, and rotated 90 degrees toward the assemblers so that the open tops of the pedestals are now adjacent to the underside of the desk top. The openings in the pedestal side top flanges are aligned with the corresponding openings in the bottom of the desk top. As the drawer openings are now facing the assemblers, convenient access may now be had to the interior, and fastening screws or bolts are inserted through the openings in the pedestal side top flanges and screwed into the nuts retained within the desk top. The completed assembly is removed from the support, inverted so that it now stands on the pedestals, and the drawers replaced. Of course, this method of assembly is merely illustrative and the desk components which I have illustrated could be assembled in other manners, but in the method described ease of access may be had for the insertion and tightening of all connecting bolts.

Top construction For use interchangeably with the same pedestal and connecting knee space panel assembly, I provide different sizes of desk tops. What might be termed the standard size, say 28 X 60", is illustrated in Figs. 1 and 4, and is the solid line top construction shown in Figs. 2 and 3. It will be noticed that the edges of this size of desk top are substantially flush with the outer sides, backs and fronts of the desk pedestals.

The overhanging of a'desk top of greater width than 28", say 36" x 60", is indicated by the dotted outline 62 in Fig. 3. Similarly, when an even larger size of desk top, say 36" x '76", is used it will not only overhang the rear of the pedestals, as is indicated at 62 in Fig. 3, but will also overhang the outer sides of the pedestals, as is indicated at 63 and 64, in Fig. 2.

These various sizes of desk tops differ only in size and in details of reinforcement. Otherwise, they all include a hollow nested pan construction with reinforcing members within the hollow space between the pans and at the edges thereof, and additional corner reinforcing members plus a top surface covering and molding for the edge of the desk top.

Thus, referring to Fig. l, the standard size desk top 26 is shown with the linoleum top surface 65 and the sheet metal sub-top 66, upon which the linoleum surface 65 lies, broken away to expose the reinforcing members within the desk top. The sub-top 56 is coextensive with the top area of the desk top and has downturned flanges along its straight edges. The sub-top flange arrangement is shown in Figs. 9 and 10. Referring to Fig. 9, the sub-top 66 is shown as having a beaded edge 10 from which extends'downwardly and integral therewith, a flange H, which is inwith inturned flanges.

6 cli'ried slightly toward the interior of the desk top. At its lower extremity; the flange H is bent horizontal, as is shown at 72. The linoleum sur-.

face 65 overlies sub-top 66 throughout the lati ters entire area and has a beveled edge 13. From this description, it is evident that the linoleum. surface rests upon a sheet. metal plate which has downwardly extending skirts at the straight sides thereof and that these skirts are provided In effect, the sub-top is an inverted shallow pan construction.

The bottom surface of the desk top is likewise a shallow pan construction but it has upturned flanges at the edges thereof which mate with the :downturned flanges on the sub-top. Thus, the

height, the sub-top 66 will nest within the filler top 38 to form a hollow top construction. In Fig. 10 this nested relation is shown, and it will be noticed that flange II is set inward a sufficient amount, by virtue of beaded portion in, to accommodate flange 14 and cause the latter to lie substantially flush with the edge of the beaded portion 70. Flanges H and M are provided with a series of aligned openings, such as 15 and 76 into which self-tapping screws can be threaded to retain the sub-top and filler top together.

The hollow nested pans; i. e., the sub-top 66 and filler top 33, are reinforced by a plurality of Z-bars. Referring to Figs. 1' and 4, Z-bars 43, 61, 68 and 69, form a rectangular outline adjacent the flanges of the sub-top. Z-bars 43 and 68 extend crosswise of the desk top; that is, in the direction of the width of the desk top and Z-bars 61 and 69 extend lengthwise of the desk top. The positioning of these particular Z-bars with respect to the flanges of the subtop can be best observed in Fig. 9. There, Z-bar 69 has its lower horizontal flange l1 overlying the inturned horizontal portion 12 of flange II and has its upper horizontal flange 18 attached I to the underside of sub-top 66. The arrangement is the same for the Z-bars adjacent the edges of the other sides of the desk top. In all cases the lower horizontal flanges of the Z-bars extend outward from the center of the desk and the upper horizontal flanges of the Z-bars extend inward toward the center of the desk. The upper horizontal flanges, such as 18, of the Z-bars adjacent the edges of the desk top are beveled at the corners of the desk top in order to match up correctly, as is indicated at 19 in Fig. 4.

In addition to the Z-bars constituting a rectangular framework for the hollow desk top, additional Z-bars extend lengthwise of the desk top and likewise lie between the sub-top and filler top. These Z-bars are indicated at 46, Figs. land 4. Their upper horizontal flanges contact the underside of the sub-top 66 and their lower horizontal flanges contact the, upper surface of filler top 38. All of the Z-bars are attached to the sub-top by spot welds.

For the oversize desk top construction, say 36" x 76", illustrated in Figs. 5-8, inclusive, the sub-top, filler top and edge z-bar construction isthe same as that which has been described for these-called standard size top, illustrated in Figs.

aeemaoo 1 and 4. However, the longitudinal Z.-bars 46,, used for reinforcing the central portion of the desk top, illustrated in Figs. 1 and 4, are replaced in the construction shown in Figs. 5-8, inclusive, by crisscrossed flanged channel members. A series of flanged channels 89 is placed crosswise of the desk top with the channel web 8| lying against the upper surface of the filler top 82. In this position the channel flanges 83 face upward. Abutting against the cross channels 89 and extending at right angles thereto and lengthwise of the desk top are a second series of flanged channel members 89. As is shown in Fig. 7, the channel webs B5 lie against the underside of the sub-top 39 and the channel flanges 91 abut against flanges 83 of the cross channels 80. Where the respective channel flanges so abut, the channel members are preferably spot weldedtogether at these points.

Also, where the cross channels 80 extend under the top flanges of the edge Z-bars which extend lengthwise of the desk top such as top flange I9I, an additional flanged channel section 88, shown in Fig. 8, is provided to fill the space between the ends of the cross channels and the top flanges of the lengthwise edge Z-bars thereby providing an additional reinforcement at these points. As is shown in Fig. 8, the channel section or spacer clip 88 is oversized as compared to the cross-channels 89 whereby the web portion I92 of channel 98 extends across the flanges 83 of the cross-channel 89 and is spot welded thereto. The flanged portions, such as I93, abut against and are welded to the underside of Z-bar top flange I9I. It will be understood that a channel clip 88v is provided at each end of each cross-channel 89.

The crisscross arrangement of the flanged channel reinforcing members gives a reticulated or grid construction which is very strong and which adequately strengthens the overhanging edges of the desk top. Obviously, if the desk top is not to overhang the sides of the desk but only the rear of; the desk, then fewer crisscross channel members 80 will be required.

Top corner construction- Additional reinforcement is provided for the rounded corners of the desk top by means of a corner plate which fits into the desk corners. This corner plate is illustrated in Fig'. 11 and includes an inclined plateportion 99 having a substantially horizontal arc-shaped top flange or shelf 99 integral therewith, and a substantially horizontal bottom flange 9I integral therewith.

As is shown in Fig. 9, the downwardly extending flanges of the-sub-top 66, such as flange II, ex tend only along the straight edges of the subtop 66 and are discontinuous at the roundedcorner portions of the sub-top; For example, see Fig. 9, the sub-top flanges shown discontinue at 94 and 95. This leaves gaps betweenthe sub top-flanges, said gapsbeing located at therounded corners of the desk top and the corner reinforcing members, illustrated in Fig. 11, fill these gaps to complete the flange arrangement of the subtop and also to strengthen the desk corners.

Referring to Fig. 9, the plate" portion 89' fillsthe gap between edges 94 and 95 of the sub-top flanges II and 91 and the arc-shaped upper horizontal shelf 99 on plate 89- abuts against the underside of the projecting rounded corner portion 96 of sub-top B6 and is coextensive-therewith. Corner plate side flanges 922 and 93 lie against. the inner sidesof sub-top flanges 91' and 8, It and are spot welded thereto. This positioning is indicated in dotted outline in Fig. 9. Also, the lower horizontal flange 9| on plate member. 89 extends inward toward the center of the desk top, and tab members'extending from the, flange 91 overlie the lower horizontal flange portions of the sub-top flanges to form a substantially continuous lower horizontal flange throughout the, lower periphery of the desk edge. For example, tab member 98, shown in Fig. 11, overlies flange member I2, shown in Fig. 9, the lower flange 11 of the Z-bar 69 being suitably cut away for this purpose. The'filler top 38 has a flange portion 99 inclined upwardly and of substantially the same size as the plate member 89. Thus, when the sub-top is nested into the filler top, the inner surface of flange 99 abuts against the outer surface of plate 89. Openings I09 and IOI are formed in plate 89 and are aligned withopenings I92 and I93 in flange 99. The arrangement of parts, described for one corner of the desk top, is the same for all four corners of the desk top.

Molding construction The exposed surfaces of the filler top flanges, such as flange I l, and the exposed surfaces of the corner flanges, such as flange 99, are covered by molding. The molding is formed in straight strip portions which cover the straight edges of the desk top and corner cap portions which overlie the ends of the straight strip portions and which also cover the rounded edges of the desk top.

The appearance of the straight strip molding is shown at I99 in Fig. 2, and I95 in Fig. 3, and a section I96 of this molding is illustrated in greater detail in Fig. 9 and in cross section in Fig. 10. As will be seen in both Figs. 9 and 10, the strip molding which is preferably an extruded plastic molding is, inv cross section, a crescent configuration having integral inturned flanges I98 and I99 at the ends of a crescentshaped wall portion I94. The outer surface of the molding is artistically grooved, as indicated at I91. In the example shown, the inturned flanges I98 and I99 abut against the outer surface of flange I4 on filler top-38. The top of the strip molding is provided with a beveled flange II9, which lies against the beveled edge I3 of the linoleum surface 65 to form, a smooth continuationof this surface.

The strip molding is retained in place by spring finger fasteners, such as fastener II I, illustrated Figs. 10 and 12. Fastener III, has a pair of forwardly extending spring fingers II2 and II3 and also hasflat type spring arms IM and H5. The flat type spring arms II5 bear against theinner surface II6 of the crescent-shaped wallportion I94 and the spring arms I-III bear against the interior surfaces of flanges I08 and I99 on the strip molding, i. e., the surfaces that face the inner surface I I6 of wall portion I99. Thus, the

spring arms I I4 and I I5 wedge the spring fastener III in place within the strip molding. When so positioned, the spring fingers II2 and II3 extend from the interior of the strip molding and, in the example shown, are inserted through aligned openings II! and H8 in flanges 1'4 and TI respectively. Opening II! is slightly larger than '8 and the spring fingers II2 and H9 engage the sides of opening II8 toretain the; molding in place. A plurality of aligned openings, such as II'I'and' I I8, are provided along the edges of the desk top and a corresponding numher of fasteners are used to retain thestrip molding in place. Prior to attaching the straight molding strips to the edges of the desk top, the spring fasteners are easily inserted into each molding strip from either end thereof.

Molded plastic corner caps, such as is illustrated in Figs. 13 and 14, complete the molding around the desk edges. These corner caps are, of course, rounded to conform to the round desk top corners and are grooved on the exterior in the same manner as is the strip molding so that a continuous molding appears. In effect, the corner caps are elbow sections which have in tegral ofiset flanges at the ends of the elbow which overlie the ends of the strip molding. Thus, referring to Figs. 13 and 14, each corner cap is shown as including an elbow-shaped wall portion I20, of crescent shape as viewed in a cross-section taken at a right angle to the elbow curve, see Fig. 15, and having offset flanges I2I and I22 integral therewith. The ends of the strip molding fit into notched recesses I23 and I24 in the flanges I2I and I22. A shelf section I25 projects inward from the top portion of wall I20. This shelf underlies the rounded flange which projects outwardly from the corner plate portion 89. A continuation, shown at I26, of the wall portion I20 abuts against the beveled edge 13 of the linoleum top surface 65 to form a smooth continuation of this surface. In addition to the shelf portion I25, inner strengthening ribs I21 are formed integral with the wall portion I20. Also formed integral with the wall portion I20 and projecting .beyond the strengthening ribs I21 are a pair of post members I28 and I29. When the molding corner cap is attached to a corner of the desk top, such as is illustrated in Fig. 9, post member I28 extends through aligned openings I03 and IOI and post member I29 extends through aligned openings I02 and I00. The arrangement is the same at all four corners of the desk top.

To retain the corner caps in position at the corners of the desk top a spring finger gripping member, shown at I30 in Fig. 16, is provided for each set of aligned corner openings such as, for example, aligned openings I02 and I30. The gripping member I30 has an annular collar portion I 3I which abuts against the outer surface of the filler top corner flanges, such as flange 99. A second annular collar portion I32 abuts against the inner surface of the corner plate portions, such as 89. Inthis manner the gripping member I30 is held at the aligned openings, such as I02 and I00, so that when one of the molding corner cap post members, such as post I29, is inserted through the aligned openings it will also pass centrally through the gripping member I30. Gripping fingers I 33 and I 34 are biased against the outer surface I95 of the post member, and are turned inward to bite into this surface, should one attempt to pull the corner cap away from the desk top. By this construction, the molding corner caps are easily applied to the desk corners and are strongly held in position thereon.

Pedestal construction In the following description, the term pedestal is taken to mean that portion of the desk which receives the desk drawers, includes the desk feet, and upon which the desk top is placed. Normally, for a conventional size desk, say 28" 60", two pedestals will be provided, these being spaced apart to form a knee space beneath the top of the desk. In the embodiment of my invention, which I have illustrated in the drawings, I use spaced pedestals and these pedestals are formed identically, except that certain features may be left-hand or right-hand, as required. To facilitate the task of illustrating the pedestal construction in the drawings, I have omitted the desk drawers in all views.

The main elements of the pedestals are the pedestal feet, the sheet metal members which form the sides of the pedestal and the back bottom and lower front thereof, and the skeleton framework which the sheet metal members inclose and to which they are attached. a

With reference to Figs. 1, 17, 18 and 19, it will be observed that the pedestal framework is composed of four corner posts I35, I36, I31 and I38, a box channel member I39 which extends at the top of the pedestal between corner posts I35 and. I33, and cross skeleton members I40 and MI. Cross member I40 extends across the bottom of the front portion of the pedestal between corner posts I35 and I36 and cross member I4I extends across the pedestal bottom at the rear of the pedestal between corner posts I31 and I38. With the exception of the box channel I39, all of the framework members; i. e., the four corner posts and the two cross members, are formed as Z-bars. Connection of one framework member to another is accomplished, preferably, b spot welding the parts together. Thus, referring to Fig. 20, the upturned end flange I42 of box channel I 39 is spot welded to flange I43 of Z-bar I35. Likewise, the vertically extending wall I44 of box channel I 39 is spot welded to web member I45 of the Z-bar I35. This method of attachment is duplicated at the other top corner portion of the pedestal front. Referring to Fig. 21, it will be observed that web portion I46 of Z-bar I40 is spot welded to web I45 of Z-bar I35. Flange I43 of Z-bar I35 is broken awayat I41 to accommodate the top flange I48 of the transverse Z-bar I40. At the rear of the pedestal the web portion of the transverse Z-bar I4I likewise contacts the web portions of the corner post Z-bars I31 and I38 and these members are spot welded to each other at the areas of contact, as shown in Fig. 18.

The framework just described is enclosed by sheet metal side members 25 and I49 and by a continuous back and bottom and lower front sheet metal member I 50. The side member 25 is the pedestal inner side member; i. e., the side that faces the knee space. As such, it is provided with the openings 24 through which are passed the members connecting the pedestal to the knee space panel 23. Both the inner side member 25 and the outer sidemember I49, are formed alike, one left-hand and the other right-hand. Each is provided with an inturned horizontal flange at the top thereon designatedat 58 and 59, and these flanges contain the openings through which pass the bolts connecting the pedestals to the desk top. Two of these bolt openings are indicated at 60 and BI.

Taking the inner side 25, for example, a sheet of metal is cut out as indicated by the pattern shown in Fig. 23. A button-hook slot or cutout of the shape indicated at 208 is made for the bending of the rounded corners, such as corner I99, Fig. 1. Such a cut-out leaves a rounded ballshaped portion 201, a rounded socket-shaped portion 204, and two straight portions 205 and 206 of remaining metal at the corner (Fig. 23). When rounded -.degree bends are made between guide lines shown at 2| 0, the rounded ball-shaped portion 201 and the rounded socket-shaped portion 204 fit together, and the two straight por-= Fig. 24. Gas welding this joint together and grinding the surface smooth forms the finished rounded corner indicated at I99 in Fig. 1. The advantage-of forming the rounded corners from such a pattern is that only one joint is required to form a smooth round surface instead of the two or more required from other methods of layout, and the welded joint is spaced from the apex of the rounded corner, thereby simplifying the bending, welding and grinding operations.

A cut-out of the shape indicated at 209, Fig. 23, is made in the metal sheet for side 25. The edge of the sheet of metal indicated at 200 is bent overat 90 degrees to form flange 58 (Figs. 1, 17, 19 and 22), and the aforementioned rounded bends are made between guide lines .2-I0, Fig. 23, and the remaining metal surrounding cut-out 209 forms a rounded corner with a flange-on the top, as shown at I56 in Figs. 1 and 22. Similar cutouts and bends are made in the sheet to form the other two corners of side 25, the rounded front edge'of side 25, as shown at I'5I in Fig. 20, and the rounded bottom edge shown at I58 in Fig. 18.

Edge 20I, Fig. 23, is bent around flange I52 of corner post I35, Figs. 20 and 21, to form flange I53. Edge .202, Fig. 23, abuts against back, bottom and lower front member I50 and overlies flange I51 of that member as shown in Fig. 22. Side 25 is spot welded to flange I51 at spaced points along the line of said overlap. Edge 203, Fig. 23, underlies flange I59 of the back, bottom and lower front member I50, Fig. 18, and abuts the side of member I50. Where the overlap of flange I59 and side 25 occurs, the two are spot welded'together at spaced points.

Ihe back, bottom and lower front member I50 is offset slightlyoutwardly from the pedestal side members-25 and I49. This isdue to the depth =f-rom the outer face of member I50 to the face of flanges I51 and I59, against the face of which flanges the side members -25 and I09 are welded, being considerabl greater than the thickness of the metal making up side members 25 and 149. I term this formation of member I50 anembossed formation. Since the edges of the sides-such as I edge 202 of side 25, Fig. 22, abuts against the side of member I50 within such embossment, such edges are effectively concealed when the desk top is in place. The desk pedestal thus has the appeararice of being constructed of one piece of metal.

Side member'25 is spot welded'at spaced points to flange I54 of Z-bar I35, see Figs. 19, 20 and 2-1, and also to flange I55 of Z-bar I38, see Figs. 18 and 22. The method of forming and attaching the pedestal outer side member I 49 to the framework and to the back, bottom and lower front member I50 is the same as that described for the pedestal inner side member 25.

The back, bottom and lower front member I50 :(see Fig. "17) extends from the top flange I 62 at the rear of the pedestal to the flange I53 which overlies and is in contact with the top flange I48 of transverse Z-bar I40. The member I50 is rounded at I'M to form the lower portion of the ipedstal front. By virtue of its overlap connection with the pedestal sidemembers Z5 and I48, the .back and bottom member I50 completes the enclosure of the pedestal framework.

Drawer guide channels, two of which are indicated at I65, Figs. 1'1 and 18, are attached to and supported by the pedestal corner posts I35,

I36, "I31 and I38. Naturally, the flange-portions, indicated at I08 in Fig. 18, of these drawer guide channels face toward the interior of the pedestal.

The guide channels are oppositely disposed "to support each side of a desk drawer. In Figs. 17 and 18, three pairs :of guide channels are shown.

The drawer guide channels are retained in position against the pedestal corner posts by integrally formed tabs which extend .into slots formed in the pedestal corner posts and which are bent against the corner post sides to make a firm connection. For example, see Figs. 17 and 18, a tab I61 which is integral with drawer guide channel IE5 is shown as being received within slot I68 in the pedestal corner post I38. The tab I51 and slot I68 are shown in dotted outline in Fig. 17. At the front portion of the pedestal, the drawer guide channels are similarly retained and, in Fig. 1'1, a tab I69 is shown, in dotted outline, as being received within a slot I10 in pedestal corner post I35. An additional tab I'II is bent over, through a slot I12 and engages corner post I to form a double retaining means at the front end of the drawer guide channel. A portion of each drawer guide channel is cut away and bent inwardly toward the interior of the pedestal to serve as a stop for the desk drawers. Such a portion is indicated at I13 in Fig. 17. See also Fig. 1. Each drawer guide channel is attached to the pedestal in the same manner and each is of substantially identical construction, the only difference being that one set of channels will be left-hand and the other righthand.

The opening in the front of the pedestal; i. e., the space that receives .the drawers is framed by the front pedestal corner posts I35 and I38 and the box channel I39 which extends across the top of the pedestal between these corner posts,

plus the transverse Z-bar I40 which extends across the bottom of the pedestal between these corner posts. In addition, the back bottom, and lower front sheet member I50 laps over transverse Z-bar I50 at I83 and the pedestal side members 25 and I89 lap over the front corner posts I35 and I36, as is indicated at I53 in Fig. 20, using side member '25 as an illustration, to complete the frame for the opening in the front of the pedestal which receives the desk drawers.

Attached to the bottom surface of each pedestal is a foot member designated generally at I'M and I15 in Fig. 1. Each pedestal foot member is constructed in the same manner so that a description of one will suffice for both. Foot member I15 is shown in cross section in Fig. 18.

I designate the shape of each of these pedestal feet as a pontoon shape, intending this term to designate a configuration such as is shown in the drawings. Taking the pontoon-shaped foot I15 as an example, it includes an intermediate body member I16 and rounded end caps I11 and I18. The overall length of members I16, I11 and I18 is only slightly less than the length of the pedestal bottom.

The intermediate portion I16 is formed from a sheet metal section which is bent to an approximate U-shape, as viewed in cross section in Fig. 18. Horizontal flanges I19 and I00, formed on the intermediate portion I16, abut against the bottom surface of member I50 and are spot welded thereto at spaced points. Rounded end caps I11 and I18 overlap the ends of the intermediate body member I16 as indicated by the dotted line outlines NH and 182 in Fig. 17. Spot weld connections are :made at these overlaps.

Also, the end caps have horizontal flanges, indicated at I83 and I84, at the tops thereof which abut against the bottom surface of member I50 and are spot welded thereto. Flanges I83 and I84 are of the same width as flanges I19 and I09 and match these flanges to form a continuous flange surface at the top portion of each pedestal foot.

Only the end cap members rest against the floor surface to support the desk. As is indicated in Fig. 17, end caps I1! and I16 contact the floor surface I85 at I86 and I81. The intermediate body portion I I6 and the portions of the end caps IT! and I18, which overlap the portion I at I6I and I82, are spaced from the floor surface as is indicated by the space I88. This means, of course, that the end caps I I1 and I 78 are notched away, as indicated at I89 and I90, to permit this spacing from the floor surface I85. In this manner, the whole desk bears against the floor surface at four spaced points, two for each pedestal foot member.

Summary From the foregoing it is apparent that my desk construction is light in weight, artistic in appearance and yet does not sacrifice strength and rigidity to achieve these desirable features. The use of light-weight strong sheet metal sections throughout the desk, these members being spaced in the desk top to form a hollow top construction, keeps the overall weight of the desk to a minimum. The grooved plastic molding around the edge of the desk top, the tapered pedestals, and the novel pontoon foot construction all make for artistic appearance. Strength and rigidity are obtained by Z-bar and channel stiffening members which are located within the desk top andwhich form the pedestal framework. The embossed formation of the back bottom and lower front member of the pedestals conceals the joints with the sides of the pedestals.

Storage of desks, shipping of desks, and desk maintenance are all facilitated by the knockdown arrangement which I provide. The separable desk components can be assembled and disassembled quickly and without requiring special skill on the part of the person doing the work.

While I have described particular embodiments of my invention, I wish it to be unerstood that I do not intend to be restricted thereto, but that I intend to cover all modifications thereof which are apparent to one skilled in the art and which come within the subject and scope of my invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. In a desk, a pedestal construction comprising substantially vertical Z-bar front and rear corner posts, a first substantially horizontal Z- bar connected to the front corner posts adjacent the bottom ends thereof, said horizontal 2- bar extending transversely between said front corner posts, a second horizontal Z-bar connected to the rear corner posts adjacent the bottom ends thereof, said second horizontal Z-bar extending transversely between said rear corner posts, a box channel connected to said front corner posts adjacent the top ends thereof, said box channel extending transversely between said front corner posts, a continuous sheet member overlying the first horizontal Z-bar to form the lower front surface of said pedestal, said continuous sheet member also forming the bottom and back surfaces of the pedestal, and side sheet members, said side members being attached to the front and rear corner posts and overlapping the continuous sheet member.

2. In a desk, a pedestal construction including a skeleton framework, a continuous sheet forming the back, and a substantial part of the bottom, of the pedestal and secured thereto, said sheet having at least a portion of one side margin thereof embossed to provide a marginal attaching flange that is offset from but parallel to the main body of said sheet and connected thereto by a connecting web of substantially greater depth than the thickness of said sheet, a side sheet applied to said one side of the continuous sheet and having a marginal flange overlapping said attaching flange and substantially abutting said connecting web, thereby providing an offset in the juxtaposed sheets, and means for securing the side sheet to the continuous sheet through said overlapping and attaching flanges.

3. In a desk, a pedestal construction including a skeleton framework, a continuous sheet member forming the back, and a substantial part of the bottom, of the pedestal and secured thereto, a side sheet member applied to one side of the continuous sheet member to form an ofiset joint between said members, one of said members having a marginal attaching flange that is offset from but substantially parallel to the main body of the sheet member of which it is a part and connected thereto by a connecting web of substantially greater depth than the thickness of said sheet, the other member having a marginal flange overlapping said attaching flange and substantially abutting said connecting web, and means for securing the side sheet to the continuous sheet through said overlapping and attaching CHARLES M. ABRAHAMSON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,852,342 Ash Apr. 5, 1932 1,866,174 Richardson July 5, 1932 1,934,644 Rand Nov. 7, 1933 2,061,672 Ringel Nov. 24, 1936 2,106,544 Wege Jan. 25, 1938 2,235,090 Stall et a1. Mar. 18, 1941 2,250,030 Morgan July 22, 1941 2,258,489 Grindle Oct. 7, 1941- 2,387,506 Freeman Oct. 23, 1945 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 585,269 Great Britain Feb. 4, 1947

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Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2664332 *Jul 28, 1951Dec 29, 1953Herrick Wallace DGuard for industrial machines
US2987362 *Aug 22, 1958Jun 6, 1961Art Woodwork LtdReleasable fastening means for parts for an article of furniture
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Classifications
U.S. Classification312/195
International ClassificationA47B47/00, A47B13/00, A47B13/08, A47B95/00, A47B47/02, A47B95/04, A47B17/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B95/043, A47B17/00, A47B13/08, A47B13/003, A47B47/02, A47B17/003
European ClassificationA47B17/00, A47B13/00C, A47B17/00B, A47B95/04B, A47B47/02, A47B13/08