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Publication numberUS2560649 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 17, 1951
Filing dateJul 19, 1948
Priority dateJul 19, 1948
Publication numberUS 2560649 A, US 2560649A, US-A-2560649, US2560649 A, US2560649A
InventorsHornaday William H D
Original AssigneeHornaday William H D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disposable cleaner device
US 2560649 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1951 w. H. D. HORNADAY 2,560,649

DISPOSABLE CLEANER DEVICE Filed July 19, 1948 mum muu "'IIIIIIIIIIII JNVENTOR.

' E I BM IQTTOQNEY.

Patented July 17, 1951 UNITED STATES. PATENT OFFICE 2,560,649 DlSPOSABLE CLEANER DEVICE William H. D. Hornaday, Los Angeles, Calif. I

Application July 19, 1948, Serial No. 39,400

19 Claims. 1

This invention has to do generally with cleaning devices andassociated cleansing compounds, and is directed particularly to a novel 'bag type device especially adaptable with its contained composition, to the cleansing of toilet bowls.

Considering the general purposes of the invention, one of my primary objectives is to avoid the various objectionable aspects of conventional toilet bowl cleaning procedures, compositions and appliances, in favor of a distinctly different cleanser form and composition characterized by its capacity for relatively simple and convenient use to readily and thoroughly cleanse and remove stains from all internal surfaces of the bowl. The customary practice of course is to deposit in the bowl a cleaning compound which often, if not ordinarily,-requires for its effectiveness dissolution in the bowl water and standing over an extended period of time. Thereafter the resulting solution is applied by a brush to the bowl surfaces. Among the apparent disadvantgaes are those of having to allow the solution to remain in the bowl for a considerable period, and of having to keep a brush available for the final cleansing.

In accordance with the invention, I have provided a cleaning device in the nature of an applicator for a cleaning composition, the latter being characterized by its capacity for effervescence to cause most effective formation, dissolution and distribution of the ultimate cleaning solution, and the bag portion of the device being characterized and particularly related to its effervescent contents, by the capacity ,of the bag to cause effervescence and release of the cleaning composition at a properly retarded rate, while at the same time affording a rubbing instrument or swab which is applicable to the bowl surfaces during continued effervescence of the bag contents. A further feature of the bag, and a matter of practicable importance and convenience, is its substantial disintegrability in water so that after use, the bag may be left in and flushed out of the bowl Thus the disadvantages of ordinary bowl cleaning methods are overcome in that the present applicator permits immediate and easy cleaning of the bowl surfaces without the usually required delay, and further in that after use, the residual portion of the bag or applicator can be flushed away.

More specifically, the invention contemplates the use of an effervescent cleaning composition in a flexible container or bag, the form and composition of which is particularly related to the requirement that the bag be permeable by fluids released by the cleaning composition upon its eifervescence, that the bag withstand its use as a wetted swab, and finally the bag be disintegrable or reducible to a degree safely permitting its being flushed out of the bowl. Referring first to the cleaning compound, the invention broadly contemplates the use of any suitable composition which is effervescent when wetted, and containing a suitable cleansing agent, preferably, though typically, a water soluble wetting agent. The cleaning composition may also include a suitable germicide and odorant or deodorizing agent.

In its preferred form, the bag wall is made in multiple layers, one or more inner layers comprising a fluid permeable material which tends also to disintegrate in water. Effective results have been had using layers of fibrous, non-woven cellulose tissue, such as the commonly known cleaning tissue, which will readily pass carbon dioxide and water solutions released by the efiervescence. The thickness or number of tissue layers may be predetermined to control the rate of water'access to the effervescent composition. Best results have been had using two thicknesses of ordinary cleansing tissue.

Because of its water-disintegrability, the inner tissue thickness of the bag is externally reenforced by a material serving the dual purposes of a support for the inside substances and materials, and also of presenting a surface sufliciently irregular to function effectively in rubbing off all foreign matter from the bowl surfaces as the bag is used as a swab. Preferably, I use as the outside reenforcement a layer of loose or open weave material such as cotton or other cellulosic netting.

The invention will be understood further and to best advantage by reference to the typical embodiment shown by the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 is a general view illustrating an arrangement in which the individual bagsand applicator handle may be accommodated in a package or box;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged view, illustrating the bag formation;

I partly in section,

Fig. 3 is a view of the applicator in a spread condition;

Fig. 4' is a fragmentary view illustrating the formation of the applicator gripping tips;

Fig. 5 is a view showing a bag gripped by the applicator; and a Fig. 6 is a view similar to 'g. 2 showing a variational form.

Referring first to Fig. 2, the cleaning device is shown to comprise in a preferred though typical form, a flexible bag In containing a suitable effervescent composition H of granular form be cleaned.

Typically the composition II will include an alkaline metal carbonate which, upon reaction with an acidic constituent of the composition, will produce effervescence by release of carbon dioxide. As the carbonate, I may use from about 20 to 30 parts (by weight) of sodium carbonate or sodium bicarbonate. The preferred solid acidic constituent is citric acid or tartaric acid. the amount of which preferably is suflicient to neutralize all the carbonate, with some residual acidity, so that a water solution of the entire composition II is on the acid side. Typically, the proportion of acid may range between about 30 to 45 parts. Caking or agglomerizing of the composition particles is prevented by the addition of a suitable material, such as from to parts of starch, talc, fiour or so called whiting. The cleansing agent of primary effectiveness may comprise a detergent or wetting agent such as a petroleum sulfonate alkali metal alginate, or such generally known commercial wetting agents as sold under the trade names Aerosol, Acimul, D-140 and Nacanol. The wetting agent content may range between about 10 to 20 parts. Added to the above ingredients may be a small percentage of a germicide such as thymol, soluble pine oil, or pin needle oil.

The invention contemplates the possible desirability of including in the bag, a scouring material, preferably of a water soluble composition, which desirably is accommodated in the form of an integrated or cake-like core I2 which, upon dispersion through the bag wall of the composition I], can then be released for scouring purposes. Typically the core l2 may consist of a mass of particles of volcanic ash, diatomaceous earth, seismotite or the like. The combined effects of wetting and pressure exerted in using the bag as a swab, may cause the core I! to disintegrate and its particles to be released through the bag onto the surfaces being cleaned.

As previously indicated, the bag proper comprises an inside material, layer or pair of layers generally indicated at I3, readily permeable by the gas and solution formed upon wetting of the composition II, and having the further property of disintegrability in water to the extent that after use the bag may be safely flushed out of the bowl. Preferably, the inner material I3 comprises two layers M of thin cellulose fiber sheet tissue, tests having demonstrated that two layers of the ordinary cleansing tissue are readily gas and liquid permeable, and yet have, when supported by the outer open mesh layer, sufflcient resistance to liquid permeation, that will assure release of the effervescing composition H at a properly retarded-rate. The outer reenforcing layer l5 preferably consists, as explained, of an open mesh fabric such as a cellulosic netting, the weave of which is sufliciently close to properly support the tissue lining, and yet such that after use, the bag will reduce down to a very small bulk presenting no restriction in the bowl siphon.

It is to be understood that the bag may be generally shaped and closed in any desired manner. Preferably it is formed with a neck l6, closed as by stitching at H, to provide a reduced portion for engagement by an applicator handle. The latter is shown to comprise typically a handle tong l8 consisting of a pair of sections l9 pivoted together by a snugly set rivet or other fastener 20. The ends of section H are recessed at 2| and 22 for application and adherence to the .bag neck It when the applicator is applied thereto as shown in Fig. 5. For convenience in packaging and domestic use, the bags l0 may be accommodated within a box-like package 23, see Fig. 1, having a longitudinal partition 24 at the opposite side of which the handle I8 may be received in collapsed condition.

In use, the applicator is grasped by the handle and immersed in the bowl water, causing the composition H to become wetted and to effervesce. The carbonate of course reacts with the acid, while at the same time the wetting agent goes into solution in the water penetrating into the bag. The resulting eifervescence effectively carries the wetting agent and germicide solution out through the bag layers l3 and 15, the combined effects of gas release and fine porosity of the bag wall, causing an extremely intimate and thorough dispersion of the released gas and solution. Accordingly, as the bag is applied to and rubbed over the bowl surfaces, the active release of thegas and cleaning solution produces a high y eflective cleansing action on the surfaces. Having retarded release, the composition H will continue to eifervesce and disperse over a period of time suflicient to permit thorough cleansing of all surfaces of the bowl. And ultimately, the bag will reduce down to a negligiblt bulk presenting no disposal problem.

Fig. 6 illustrates a variational form of the invention differing primarily from the embodiment of Fig. 2, with respect to the form of the scouring core, and the water disintegrability of the entire outer wall structure of the bag. Here the bag 25 contains an effervescent composition 21 of the type above described, retained within two-ply thicknesses 2B and 29 of the thin, permeable and water disintegrable tissue. The core 30 may typically have the form of a cellulose fiber compact uniformly impregnated with fine particles of a water insoluble scouring material. As illustrated,

. the core may be extended up through the neck of the bag, so as to be within the direct grasp of the applicator tongs. If used in the absence of an outer reenforcing layer, such as the netting IS in Fig. 2, the tissues 28 and 29 will rapidly disintegrate in water and more suddenly release the effervescing composition 21. Thus an agitated, and carbonated water solution of the cleansing agent is quickly formed upon immersion of the bag in the water. Thereafter, the bowl surfaces may be efiectively scoured, in the presence of the froth-like solution, by working or swabbing the surfaces with the scouring core 30.

I claim:

1. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid cleaning composition which efl'ervesces when wetted, the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through the wall into said solid composition and including a material initially readily permeated by fluids released by said composition upon its effervescence and thereafter disintegrable in water, said composition being enclosed within the bag so that the rate of water passage into the bag and the fluid release therefrom are controlled by the permeability of the bag wall.

2. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid mobile granular cleaning composition which efiervesces when wetted, the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through the wall into said solid composition and including a material initially readily permeated by fluids released by said composition upon its eflervescence and thereafter disintegrable in water, said composition being enclosed within the bag so that the rate of water passage into the bag and the fluid release therefrom are controlled by the permeability of the bag wall.

3. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid cleaningcomposition which eflervesces when wetted, the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through the wall into said solid composition and including a non-woven cellulosic material initially readily permeated by fluids released by said composition upon its eifervescence and thereafter disintegrable in water, said composition being enclosed within the bag so that the rate of water passage into the bag and the fluid release therefrom are controlled by the permeability of the bag wall.

4. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid. cleaning composition which effervesces when wetted, the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through the wall into said solid composition and including thin cellulose fiber tissue initially readily permeated by fluids released by said composition upon its effervescence and thereafter disintegrable in water, said composition being enclosed within the bag so that the rate of water passage into the bag and the fluid release therefrom are controlled by the permeability of the bag wall.

5. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid cleaning composition which effervesces when wetted, the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through the wall into said solidcomposition and including an inner layer of material initially readily permeated by fluids released by said composition upon its efiervescence and thereafter disintegrable in water, and an outer reenforcing layer permeable by liquid entering and released from the bag and resistant to disintegration in water, said composition being enclosed within the bag so that the rate of water passage into the bag and the fluid release therefrom are controlled by the permeability of the bag wall.

6. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid mobile granular cleaning composition which effervesces when wetted, the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through the wall into said solid composition and including an inner layer of material initially readily permeated by fluids released by said composition upon its eflervescence and thereafter disintegrable in water, and an outer reenforcing layer permeable by liquid entering and released from the bag and resistant to disintegration in water, said composition being enclosed within the bag so that'the rate of water passage into the bag and the fluid release therefrom are controlled by the permeability of the bag wall.

7. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid cleaning composition which efl'ervesces when wetted, the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through the wall into said solid composition and including an inner layer of thin cellulose fiber tissue initially readily permeated by fluids released by said composition upon its effervescence and thereafter disintegrable in water, and an outer reenforcing layer permeable by liquid entering and released from the bag and resistant to disintegration in water.

8. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid cleaning composition which ei'fervesces when wetted, the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through thewall into said solid composition and including an inner layer of material initially readily permeated by fluids released by said composition upon its eifervescence and thereafter disintegrable in water," and an outer reenforcing layer of woven open mesh material permeable by liquid entering and released fromthe bag, said composition being enclosed within the bag so that the rate of water passage into the bag and the fluid release therefrom are controlled by the permeability of the bag wall.

9. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid cleaning composition which effervesces when wetted, the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through the wall into said solid composition and includinga pair of inner layers of thin cellulose fiber tissue initially readily permeated by fluids released by said composition upon its effervescence and thereafter disintegrable in water, and an outer reenforcing layer of woven open mesh material permeable by liquid entering and released from the bag and resistant to disintegration in water. said composition being enclosed within the bag so that the rate of water passage into the bag and the fluid release therefrom are controlled by the permeability of the bag wall.

10. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid cleaning composition which effervesces when wetted, said composition including a mixture of a water soluble wetting agent, a solid organic acid and a carbonate reactive with the acid to release carbon dioxide. the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through the wall into said solid composition and including a material initially readily permeated by fluids released by said composition upon its effervescence, said composition being enclosed within the bag so that the rate of water passage into the bag and the fluid re lease therefrom are controlled by the permeability of the bag wall.

11. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid cleaning composition which eflervesces when wetted, said composition including a mixture of a water soluble wetting agent, a solid organic acid and a carbonate reactive with the acid to release carbon dioxide, the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through the wall into said solid composition and including an inner layer of material initially readily permeated by fluids released by said composition upon .its effervescence and thereafter disintegrable in water, and an outer reenforcing layer permeable by liquid entering and released from the bag and resistant to disintegration in water, said composition being enclosed within the bag so that the rate of water passage into the bag and the fluid release therefrom are controlled by the permeability of the bag wall.

12. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid cleaning composition which efiervesces when wetted, said composition including a mixture of a water soluble wetting agent, citric acid and a carbonate of the group consisting of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate, the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through the wall-into said solid composition and including a material initially readily permeated by fluids released by said composition upon its effervescence, said composition being enclosed within the bag so that the rate of water passage into the bag and the fluid release therefrom are'controlled by the permeability of, the-bag wall.

13. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid cleaning composition which eilervesces when wetted, said composition including a mixture of a water soluble wetting agent, citric acid and a carbonate of the group consisting of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate, the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through the wall into said solid composition and including an inner layer of material initially readily permeated by.

tion being enclosed within the bag so that the rate of water passage into the bag and the fluid release therefrom are controlled by the permeability of the bag wall.

14. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid cleaning composition which elfervesees when wetted," said composition including a mixture of a water soluble wetting agent, citric acid and a carbonate of the group consisting of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate, the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through the wall into said solid composition and including a pair of inner layers of thin cellulose fiber tissue initially readily permeated by fluids released by said composition upon its effervescence and thereafter disintegrable in water, and an outer reenforcing layer of woven open mesh material permeable by liquid entering and released from the bag and resistant to disintegration in water, said composition being enclosed within the bag so that the rate of water passage into the bag and the fluid release therefrom are controlled by the permeability of the bag wall.

15. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid cleaning composition which eifervesces when wetted, the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through the wall into said solid composition and including a material initially readily permeated by fluids released by said composition upon its eifervescence and thereafter disintegrable in water, and said bag having a reduced size neck portion engageable by an applicator handle, said composition being enclosed within the bag so that the rate of water passage into the bag and the fluid release therefrom are controlled by the permeability of the bag wall.

16.,A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid cleaning composition which effervesces when wetted, the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through the wall into said solid composition and including an inner layer of material initially readily permeated by fluids released by said composition upon its eflervescence and thereafter disintegrable in water. and an outer reenforcing layer permeable by liquid entering and released from the bag and resistant to disintegration in water, and said bag having a reduced size neck portion engageable by an applicator handle.

17. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid cleaning composition, which effervesces when wetted, the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through the wall into said solid composition and including a material initially readily permeated by fluids released by said composition upon its effervescence and thereafter disintegrable in water. said bag containing also a water insoluble scouring material, said composition being enclosed within the bag so that the rate of water passage into the bag and the fluid release therefrom are controlled by the permeability of the bag wall.

18. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid cleaning composition which effervesces when wetted, the wall of said bag being readily permeable by water passing through the wall into said solid composition and including a material initially readily permeated by fluids released by said composition upon its efl'ervescence and thereafter disintegrable in water, the core of said bag containing a cake of scouring material.

19. A cleansing device comprising a flexible bag containing a solid mobile cleaning composition which efiervesces when wetted, the wall of said bag wall.

WILLIAM H. D. HORNADAY.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the flle of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 680,052 Lynch Aug. 6, 1901 680,308 Atkins Aug. 13, 1901 1,346,441 Cannon July 13 ,1920 1,450,865 Pelc Apr. 3, 1923 1,661,512 Sullivan Mar. 6, 1928 1,786,513 Zuckerman Dec. 30, 1930 1,927,350 Schopp Sept. 19, 1933 2,083,193 Grassiani June 8, 1937

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2644185 *Apr 11, 1949Jul 7, 1953Leonard WeilMop with detergent supply
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Classifications
U.S. Classification401/201, 206/5, 206/229, 401/200, 206/524.7, 206/.5, 510/191
International ClassificationA47K11/10, A47K11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47K11/10
European ClassificationA47K11/10