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Publication numberUS2561577 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 24, 1951
Filing dateAug 1, 1947
Priority dateAug 1, 1947
Publication numberUS 2561577 A, US 2561577A, US-A-2561577, US2561577 A, US2561577A
InventorsRaymond G Knudsen
Original AssigneeSnap On Tools Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pneumatic impact puller and the like
US 2561577 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 24, 1951 R. G. KNUDsEN 2,561,577

PNEUMATIVC IMPACT PULLERS AND THE LIKE Filed Aug. l, 1947 1 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 fifi, 1

NT R4 Jag @a 67 3 wfewfy fa@ WM/g@ July 24, 1951 R. G. KNuDsEN 2,561,577

PNEUMATIC IMPACT PULLERS AND THE LIKE Filed Aug. l, 1947 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented July 24, 1951 UNITED sTATss PATENT OFFICE y 2,561,577 rNEUMATro IMPAc'riiULLER AND THE LIKE Raymond G. Knudsen, Kenosha, Wis., assigner to Snap-n Tools Corporation, Kenosha, Wis., a corporation of Delaware Application August 1,'"1947, serial No. 765,312

This invention relates to article pulling devices 4 Claims. (Cl. 121-43) andmore particularly to pneumatic pullers tol moreespecially the provisions of an improved 4combination impact puller that is power actuated to dislodge an article from its supporting element Without entailing any appreciable time or eiort. Numerous types of pullers have heretofore been proposed and manual impact pullers are also old in the art as illustrated by United States Letters Patent No. 1,893,414 issued January 3, 1933. This type of impact puller has operated very satisfactrilyfor dislodging gears, pulleys and similar articles from their studs or shafts. cles require only several impacts to effect `dislodgement, but modern devices, such as tractor and truck engines, embody removal sleeves to line the cylinder walls which require replacement These sleeves are pressed from time to time. into the cylinders with an appreciable load so that their removal is rather diflicult unless an eliicient power actuated pulling device` is employed. Numerous types of power pulling tools have been devised for this and other purposes but `these are, for the most part, rather slow in operation and comprise too much bulk so that they are not readily portable to the extent of affording etli- Such articient use in all types of situations where tools of this character are of value.

`One object of the present invention is to simplify the construction and improve the operation of devices of the character mentioned.

Another object is to provide an improved power actuator pulling device which is compact, speedy, and an effective article puller. l

Still another object is to provide an improved pneumatic powerv article puller that is light in weight, speedy in operation, and effectively dislodg'es articles from their supporting medium.

A further object is to provide an article puller of the vibratory impact type for dislodging articles from their supporting element.

A still further object is to provide a pneumatic impacting article puller that effectively separates elements that are tightly joined together and require appreciable relative displacement for complete dislodgement.

Still a further object is to provide an improved portable powerpulling device of the impact type which is capable of imparting relative displacement to tightly connected articles to` effect their complete separation,

Other objects and advantages will appear from the following description of an illustrative einbodiment of the present invention.

In the drawings;

Figure 1 is a sectional view in elevation o f an impacting sleeve puller device embodying teach- 'ings of the present invention.

Figure 2 is a view similar to Figure l of a modilfied embodiment of the present invention showing its adaptation as a gear puller.

Figure 3 is a sectional plan view taken substantially along line III-III of Figure 1 A Figure ll is a sectional plan view similar "to Figure 3 with the sleeve Iengaging member d isposed normally of the position illustratedinFigu re 3 whereby it can be displaced downwardly through 'a cylinder sleeve for engagementwith the lower peripheraledge thereof preparatory to effecting its removal.

Figure 5 is a sectional plan view taken substantially along line V--V of Figure 2.

Figure 6 is a sectional plan view taken substantially along line VI-VI of Figure 1. p y Figure 'l is a sectional plan view taken substantially along line VII-VII of Figure 1.

The structure selected 'forillustratin is not intended to serve as a limitatin upon the scope or teachings of the invention, but is merely illustrative if all or part of the teachings depending upon the dictatesof commercial practice. rI 'he present embodiment comprises a shank or elongated shaft member I D which is reciprocally Vmounted in a substantially cylindrical casing II members I4--I5. The casing Il has, in this instance, threadedly attached end caps IE-l'l 'which close the interior bre or air cylinder i8 ofthecasingl| As shown, the casing I I has an axially disposed 'tube I9 in threaded engagement with an axially threaded bore 20 provided in the lower end cap I6 to rigidly support the tube or sleeve I9 vthat 4serves' as a guide for the central shaft or shank l0 which projects therethrough tor provide `a threaded extension 2| to Which an anvil 22 is threadedly connected to serve as a Weighted anvil for the shank or shaft Ill j The anvil z2 is Sized to freely sude within an end nbore 23 of a sleeve 24 that extends for the length of the casing cylinder I8 to present a peripheral stop or shoulder 25 proximate to the upper end of the casing cylinder I8. The peripheral stop or shoulder 25 provided in the sleeve 24 serves to limit the descent of the weighted end member 22 of the shaft |91 and thus limit its reciprocal stroke between the peripheral sleeve shoulder 25 and interior end surface 26 of the casing end cap I1. It should be observed that the central guide tube or sleevev I9 terminates substantially in alignment with the peripheral sleeve shoulder 25 so that the weighted end member 22 will be free to reciprocate within the limits of the open end bore 23 of the sleeve 24.

It should be noted that bore 23 of the sleeve 24 communicates with a slightly smaller bore 21 that is sized to freely receive the upper section 28 of an impact hammer piston 29. 'Ihe upper section 28 of the impact hammer piston 29 has an. axial bore 39 therein that is sized to slide over the guide tube or sleeve I 9 to impact against the anvil 22 of the shaft or shank I9 to effect hammer-like vibratory contact therewith so that repeated impacts will gradually move the central shank or shaft upwardly or toward the upper end casing cap I l. The hammer piston 29 has a somewhat larger lower section 3l which is complemental in size to the lower bore region 32 of the sleeve 24 so that the hammer piston 29 will be fully guided throughout its reciprocal stroke. The stroke of the hammer piston 29 is limited by an interior surface 33 provided on the lower end cap I6 which limits the descent of the hammer piston 29. The ascent of the hammer pis ton 29 is limited by the impact of its upper section 23 against the weighted anvil 22 of the central shank or shaft I9. and the latter, in turn, is limited by the end surface 26 provided on the upper end cap I1. thereby serving to impart driving impacts to the shaft I9 in a series of successive reciprocations that result in a vibratory driving action against the weighted anvil 22 to accomplish the intended pulling operation.

As shown, the hammer piston 29 has an enlarged bore 34 extending from its lower end to a position proximate to the upper section 28 thereof to provide an air space around the guide tube or sleeve I9. The air space 34 communicates with a plurality of radially disposed ports 35. in this instance four, that extend transversely through the hammer piston 29 to communicate with an annular space 36 defined by the somewhat enlarged sleeve bore 32 and an annular groove 31 that is provided in the circumference of the hammer piston 29 proximate to the upper solid section 28 thereof. The annular air space 36 communicates with a restricted circumferential air space 38 provided around the central regiony of the hammer piston 29 to communicate with an annular groove 39 provided in the hammer piston 29 between the lower solid section 3I thereof and its mid-section 49. Consequently, the circumferential air space 38 terminates in a peripheral shoulder defined bythe annular groove 39 at its junction with the enlarged lower hamer section 3l against which the air pressure exerts a downward urge to displace the hammer 29 to its lowermost limit of movement against the end cap surface 33.

With the hammer piston 29 in its lowermost position, the interior sleeve bore 21 is free to exhaust the air through a plurality of radial ports 4I, in this instance four, provided in the wall of the sleeve 24 to coincide with aligned ports 42 corresponding in size, number and position in the `wall of the casing Il to exhaust the air to the exterior atmosphere. Air under pressure from any suitable source, such as a receiver, is directly connected to an air compressor which supplies air under pressure of from fifty to one hundred pounds per square inch to any length of rubber or other flexible hose that terminates ina nipple 43 that connects through a union 44 to an in= take nipple 45 threadedly or otherwise attached to an intake orifice 46 comprising part of the handle hub or boss I3. The intake orice 46 communicates with a valve seat 4l that has a ball check valve 48 co-operating therewith.

With this arrangement, the incoming air pressure normally seats the ball check valve 48 to close a port 49 that communicates with an intake passage 59. The intake passage 59 is disposed longitudinally through the handle hub or boss I3. A threaded set screw 5I normally closes the intake passage 59, and such provides access thereto for cleaning or other purposes. A valve actuator rod 52 projects radially through thehandle hub or boss I3 to extend into the port 49 that communicates with the valve seat 4'I to actuate the ball check valve 43 responsive to the displacement of a hand lever 53 that is pivoted as at 54 to an ear 55 comprising a llet between the handle hub I3 and the casing II (Figure 1).

As shown, the lever 53 is proximate to the handle I5 to enable the control thereof without the attendant removing his hand from the handle I5, Consequently, airV can be admitted into the casing I! to the intake passage 59 by merely depressing the lever 53 toward the handle I5. Air under pressure will occupy a circumferential chamber 56 which surrounds the sleeve 24 to enter interconnected air chambers 34-36-38 through a plurality of radial ports 5l, in this instance four, provided in the sleeve 24 proximate to its central region. This will force the hammer piston 29 upwardly to its extreme uppermost position which is determined by its contact with the weighted end member 22, that, in turn, is limited by the upper end cap I'I. In this extreme position, the air pressure in the chamber 34 yand so much thereof as is beneath the piston or hammer 29 is exhausted through the ports 35-4 I-42. The air pressure in the chamber 56 isr then eX- .erted in the restricted circumferential chamber 38 that communicates with the annular hammer piston groove 39 toforce the hammer piston 29 downwardly until it assumes its lowermost extreme position against the interior surface 33 of thea lowermost end cap I6. This downward movement of the hammer piston 29 is followed by the shaft I9 with its weighted end member 22 that descends responsive to the urge of gravity, since the device is always used in a-vertically erectv position to pull sleeves or other articles upwardly. The hammer piston 29 is again ready for its upward movement under pressure for the reasons heretofore described, and this cycle of operations continues in a series of rapid reciprocations while the control lever 53 is depressed toward the handle I5. This results inl vibratory impacts being imparted to the weighted end member 22 which transmits corresponding impacts to the shaft I9.

As shown, the shaft I9 terminates in a threaded end portion or shaft extension 59 that has a safety nut 69 threaded thereon in a position that will preclude contact with the lower end cap I6 while the device is in normal operation. Should it` occur that the upper end cap Il is broken or otherwise impaired so that the weighted end member 22 with its shaft I9 is not stopped by the end cap I'I, the safety nut 69 will be in a Position te contact the lower end cap le and preclude injuryto theoperator `whose `body is disposed above the upperfendpcapijhr Itlwill be'J observed, therefore, thatthesafety' nutj serves merely'topreclude the shaft livith itstanvil 22"" to be displacedupwardly through thecasing lli Should. this occur, great injury could" ibe'jcaused" to jthe attendant-or operatorwho is .holding the* casing l l` through` the mediunrof.` thejhandlef members `I 4 1 5t 'l The threaded :shaft *extensionj 59E-,is utilized to' connectv any suitable' "instriii; mentality theretol In the present embodiment-, an* tinteriorly, threaded, sleeve 6I" is attached "to thei lowers threadedyend portion 59of 'the shaftljtot crie" able the attachment vof any suitable `pulling deL vicegthereto `such fas a sleeve pullerengaging cap k 62j`that, in this instance, hasstepped peripheral.` shoulde1`^63464 intendedjtofengagemthe,lowermost edge, 65, of `a ,cylinder sleeve 66: The "cylinderY sleeve"66"is 4of the type that'is pressed into the cylinder bore 61of,.the.crankcase..68 of an internal combustion engine. It should be noted` that thefsleeve puller engaging cap-62fha`s 4 tan-- gentially flat parallel surfacesiSB-lw ('Figuresl and 3) that. permit, it Ito bex tilted forjfdisplacementdovvnwardly throughthe interior ,of ,.,thesleeve funtil the steppedshoulders 63?..-64ljcan engagatheflower parallel sleeve edge 65;.of,the cylinder sleeve E6.

Tojj this end, the pullerengaging cap-,eflZl'is mounted on'a threaded stud TUhaving a retainer nu t1| thereon. The other end.df..the threaded StudJUterminates inV a circularswivel ,plate,12 (Figures 1 and 4) which cooperates.,withlcomplee mentalfurcations 13414 formed',integral with a stud 15. Thestud 15 terminates in a threaded portion 16 which engages the other end of the correspondingly threaded sleeve 6| for attachment to the reciprocally mounted shaft I0. A bolt 11 extends through the furcations 13-14 and the circular swivel plates 12 of the lowermost stud 10 to pivotally connect the sleeve puller engaging cap 62 to the shaft l Il. The successive vibratory impacts of the shaft l0 imparted by the hammer piston 29 will serve to pull the cylinder sleeve B6 from its cylinder bore 61 until the cornplete removal thereof is effected. As the sleeve 66 is successively pulled from its cylinder bore 61, the operator or attendant lifts the handles lli-l5 in order that contact is maintained between the puller engaging cap 62 and the cylinder sleeve 66, although the operator does not have to exert any lifting force other than that which is necessary to maintain the puller engaging cap B2 in constant contact with the lower parallel edge 65 of the cylinder sleeve 66.

In the modied embodiment shown in Figure 2, the casing I I is similar in construction and operation in all respects with the embodiment described supra. In this case, however, the central shaft l0 has a much longer threaded shaft extension 59 for adaptation to a different type of article engaging puller. In this instance, the shaft extension 59 carries a hub body 18 that has an axial threaded bore 19 that is complemental to the threaded shaft extension 59'. A plurality of bifurcated bracket members 80, in this instance three, radially extend from the hub body 18 to carry arcuate lever arms 8l, as at 82, to the bifurcated brackets 80. The arcuate lever arms 8| terminate downwardly in inwardly directed hooks 83 that are intended to engage the peripheral edge portion 84 of of article 85 while the its extremity 86 abutting a spur gear or other type shaft extension 59 has against the part, such as a shaftl, on which thegear or other article 85 part-*such @as-*the shaft:- `8 1- is" anchored against movement or mis' an element `of a substantially *tive irrithe-i mannerdescribedl in connectionwith thefremovalgcfthe cylinder vious -`embodiments if* `Itfis-@worthyof note-thatthetube'or sleeve i9" v guidefor the shafts l0- or butrsuch'ialsolforms an air `seal tofthe cylini-'i `idegl|fy`orirllj respectively. Numerous "and varied'typesL of 1"attachments can' bey utilizedfin` conjunction "withi thfe Aextension yshaft 59L for' 59 depending upon-the nature 'orshapefof the arti# clefto'be* pulledrtherewith That may; be'varied` withinfl'a dwide"`| range,"1depending uponrthe,` comeA mercial practices f' and the `uses to which the de# commercialpractica j rangement of: parts abovedescribed in conjuncgl tion-l with-the'A illustrated embodiments deffectively" and readily pull various articles without anyappreciable efliort on the part of the operator and within minimum time requirements.

While I have illustrated and described a preferred embodimentof this invention, it must be understood that the invention is capable of considerable variations and modifications without departing from the spirit of the invention. I, therefore, do not wish to be limited to the precise details of construction set forth, but desire to avail myself of such variations and modifications as come Within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a power pulling device or the like, the

combination with a cylindrical shank for at- 4'tachment of pulling members and the like, of an air cylinder surrounding a portion of said shank, an anvil in said air cylinder attached to said shank, a cylindrical sleeve axially disposed in 'said air cylinder for a portion of its length short :of one end to allow for the displacement of said anvil between said sleeve and the end of said cylinder, said sleeve serving as a guide for said puller shank, a hammer piston within said cylinder andr slidably enveloping said axial sleeve, and compressed air inlet and exhaust ports in said cylinder to intermittently displace said cylindrical shank by displacement of said vhammer piston against said anvil for the purpose set forth.

2. In a power pulling device or the like, the combination with a cylindrical shank for attachment of pulling members and the like, of an air cylinder surrounding a portion of said shank, an anvil in said air cylinder attached to said shank, a cylindrical sleeve axially disposed in said air cylinder for a portion of its length short initial impacting of one end lto allow for the 'displacement of said anvil between said sleeve `and the end of said cylinder, said sleeve serving vas a guide for saidv puller shank,y a hammer piston Within said cylin-, der and slidably enveloping said axial sleeve,

compressed air inlet and exhaust ports in said cylinder to intermittently displace said-cylin-;

drical shank by displacement of said hammer piston against said anvil for the purpose set forth, and displacement limiting means ongsaid.- shank in the path of said cylinder to serve `as a: safety expedient in conjunction withV said im` pacting member.

3. In a power pulling device or the like, the

combination with a cylindrical shank .for at tachment of pulling members and-the flike, of. an air cylinder surrounding `a portion of `said shank, an anvil in said air cylinder attached to B an anvil in said air cylinder attached to said shank, a cylindrical rigid sleeve axially disposed in said air cylinder for a portion of its length short of one end to allow for the displacement of vsaid anvil between said sleeve and the end of said cylinder, said sleeve serving as a guide fory said puller shank, a hammer piston within said cylinder and slidably enveloping said axial sleeve, there being radial ports in said impact said shank, a cylindrical rigid sleeve axially. dis.1 1

posed in sald air cylinder for a portionzof its.l

length short of one end to allow for the displacement of said anvil between said sleeve and the end of said cylinder, said sleeve servingas4 a tachment oi pulling members and the like, of an air cylinder surrounding a portion of said shank,

hammer in communication with an annular channel thereon, compressed air inlet and exhaust ports in said cylinder to intermittently displace said cylindrical shank by displacement of said hammer pistonagainst said anvil for the purpose set forth, and displacement limiting means on said shank in the path of said cylinderto serve as a safety expedient in conjunction with said impacting member.

RAYMOND G. KNUDSEN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file Aoi this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 513,362 Foster et al Jan. 23, 1894 618,324 Blum Jan. 24, 1899 1,292,429l Bull Jan. 28, 1919 1,457,841 Johnson June 5, 1923 1,506,219 Clark Aug. 26, 1924 1,581,057 kHill Apr. 13, 1926 1,828,252 Lynch Oct. 20, 1931 2,421,324 Graham May 27, 1947 2,424,681 Eberhart July 29, 1947

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US513362 *Apr 10, 1893Jan 23, 1894 Dental plugger
US618324 *Dec 9, 1897Jan 24, 1899 Dental plugger
US1292429 *Jun 19, 1917Jan 28, 1919Richard Henry AnnisonPile-extracting, pile-driving, and like machine.
US1457841 *Feb 10, 1921Jun 5, 1923Johnson Alfred ATool for pulling gears, etc., from their shafts
US1506219 *Jul 3, 1922Aug 26, 1924Percy A PorteousReciprocating engine
US1581057 *Apr 4, 1924Apr 13, 1926Hill George SHydraulic pinion puller
US1828252 *Dec 31, 1929Oct 20, 1931Lynch James EHydraulic gear puller
US2421324 *Dec 21, 1944May 27, 1947Hinckley Myers Division Of KenThrust element for cylinder liner removing and inserting tool
US2424681 *Nov 8, 1944Jul 29, 1947Clem EberhartSleeve puller
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2693733 *Feb 9, 1950Nov 9, 1954Joy Mfg CoPower hammer for mechanical tamping
US2855662 *Mar 8, 1954Oct 14, 1958Pielop Jr William EImpact-actuated pulling device
US3008227 *Jun 21, 1956Nov 14, 1961Sohio Petroleum CompanyTube and rod driving device
US3191279 *Jun 21, 1963Jun 29, 1965Gen Motors CorpPress-fitting apparatus
US3456739 *May 29, 1967Jul 22, 1969Ishikawajima Harima Heavy IndAir hammer apparatus of a tuyere changing machine for a blast furnace
US3458918 *Aug 29, 1967Aug 5, 1969Toku Pneumatic Co LtdTuyere replacement apparatus
US4073181 *Jun 23, 1975Feb 14, 1978Steinmann Jr Eugene BAutomobile body dent puller tool
US4586230 *Jul 13, 1984May 6, 1986Richard HarydzakPortable pulling apparatus
US5163519 *Feb 10, 1992Nov 17, 1992Florida Pneumatic Manufacturing Corp.Pneumatically driven reverse impact device
US5181303 *Dec 18, 1991Jan 26, 1993John GreggDislodgement device
US5209564 *Jan 21, 1992May 11, 1993National Air Vibrator CompanyVibrator
US5210918 *Oct 29, 1991May 18, 1993Wozniak Walter EPneumatic slide hammer
US5337470 *Apr 26, 1993Aug 16, 1994Bethlehem Steel CorporationMethod and apparatus for removing a nozzle insert from a steelmaking ladle
EP0555584A1 *Oct 21, 1992Aug 18, 1993Florida Pneumatic Manufacturing CorporationPneumatically driven reverse impact device
Classifications
U.S. Classification173/132, 254/93.00R, 91/235, 29/252, 91/234, 173/131, 29/DIG.460, 29/254, 173/170
International ClassificationB25B27/02, B25D17/06, B25D9/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S29/046, B25B27/026, B25D17/06, B25D2250/171
European ClassificationB25D17/06, B25B27/02C