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Publication numberUS2562584 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1951
Filing dateJun 23, 1949
Priority dateJun 23, 1949
Publication numberUS 2562584 A, US 2562584A, US-A-2562584, US2562584 A, US2562584A
InventorsSoberg Arnold S
Original AssigneeSochris Dev Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pump
US 2562584 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

my 31 1951 A. s'. SQBRG 2,562,584

PUMP Filed June 23, 1949 L 2 Sheng-sheet 1 as Flal /7/5 ///|5 mv f f I I6 as v,/

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ARNOLD S SO ERG BY July 31,1951

Filed June 23, 1949 FIG. 3

A. S. SOBERG 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented July 31, 1951 PUMP Arnold S. Soberg, Elmhurst, Ill., assignor to Sochris Development Company, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application June 23, 1949, Serial No. 100,900

9 Claims.

This invention is directed to new and useful improvements in pump of the type wherein a cylinder and piston is positioned adjacent a source of water or liquid in the ground within a well casing llled with liquid and pressure is exerted on the liquid within the casing to depress the piston and means are provided to return the piston to move liquid from the source upwardly.

The primary object of this invention is to provide such a pump of simple construction wherein an air column is compressed on the downstroke of the piston to provide the means for returning the piston to starting position when pressure against the water column is released.

Another object is to provide means for replacing' air in the column should it become depleted.

Still a further object is to provide such pump assembly that is relatively inexpensive to manufacture, lighter in weight, and easy to maintain due to its simplicity of design and freedom from mechanical means for returning the piston to upper positions.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from the'following detailed specifications: In the drawings: Y

Fig. 1 is a sectional view of a pump assembly embodying this invention with the piston in normal position.

Fig. 2 is a View similar to Fig. 1 but showing the piston in its depressed position.

Figs. 3 and 4 similarly illustrate another form of pump assembly embodying this invention.

In detail, the well casing I is sunk in the ground to a source of liquid to be pumped. A cylinder 2 is suspended within the casing I adjacent the source of the liquid by any suitable means, for example by means of an expanded ring assembly 3, as described in my copending application Serial Number 767,673, led August 9, 1947. Cylinder 2 houses the pumping mechanism which includes cylinder 4, which is a tube closed at its top 5 but with bottom end open. Mounted on the top 5 is a rod 6 to which is secured a piston head 'I having irreversible outlet ports 8 with closures 9 of the usual well known construction. Piston head 1 is provided with suitable sealing means I 0 adapted to permit sliding movement within cylinder 2 but to prevent leakage of liquid through head Iwhen ports 8 are closed. Piston head 'I and cylinder 4 form a piston reciprocally mounted within cylinder 2.

Rigidly mounted on the lower end of cylinder 2 is an arched cap assembly II including an irreversible inlet port I2 with closure I3 of usual` well known construction, permittingliquidto enter cylinder 2 through port I2 and aroundl the;

(Cl. 10B- 46) arched portion of I'I. Extending upwardly from assembly I I is a hollow tube I 4 to the top of which is secured a sealing cup I5 extending across cylinder 2 but permitting sliding relationship therewith without liquid or gas leakage. Thus cup I5 and tube I 4'form a rigid piston within cylinder 4 which is slidably movable with relation thereto. Tube I4 extends through cup I5.

This pump assembly thus provides a liquid chamber IG open at the bottom by inlet port I2 and at the top by outlet ports 8. There is also provided an air chamber I'I to which tube I4 connects providing an air conduit I8. A tube I9` chamber I7 so that when it falls below the de. termined minimum the valve 2I may be opened to replenish the supply.

Connected to the interior of casing I is a conduit 22 leading to a piston assembly 23 adapted to provide pulsating pressure to the liquid in the casing as is well known.

Leading from casing I is a conduit 24 connected to a liquid storage tank 25 through pressure valve means 26.

In operation'the entire casing I, piston assembly `23 and chamber I6 are fllled with the liquid to be pumped, water. Piston 2l is moved from the position in Fig. 1 to that in Fig. 2 to exert pressure on the column of water in the casing I. The pressure will depress the piston formed by piston head 1, valve assembly 8, 9 and cylinder d from Fig. 1 position to Fig. 2 position. During this downward movement outlet ports 8 are opened to permit movement through the water column. Chamber I6 is decreased in volume and liquid is necessarily displaced through and to above piston head 'I.v `Simultaneously the volume of air chamber I'I is decreased to compress the air therein. As piston 2l returns to rst position the pressure on the liquid column is released and the com? pressed air in chamber I'I forces cylinder t and its associated piston head l back to its Fig. 1 position. On its return, outlet ports 3 are closed to move the liquid above it upwardly. Also on tlereturn movement valve assembly I I opens to take in liquid to chamber IS. As liquid is` displaced from chamber I6,as described, the upper end of the thus augmented liquidcolumn moves into conduit 24 through pressure valve 26 to tank 25.

From time to time, as needed, air can be sup. p plied to air chamber I'I by opening valve 2|. It..

is apparent that gas can be substituted for air without affecting the results.

This pump assembly dispenses with heavy spring construction for returning the piston 4 to upper position. Thus the assembly is of less weight, not subject to spring breakage and less expensive to make. y

It is apparent that other means may be utilized to maintain the necessary air pressure in chamber I1 such as, for example, a small cylinder or` CO2 positioned in chamber I1 and provided with an automatic regulating valve that would function to admit CO2 to chamber I2 when the pressure fell below a certain minimum. Likewise, an air bladder can be positioned in chamber I2 containing a supply of air and sealed against loss.V K

An alternate embodiment of the invention is shown in Figs. 3 and 4 wherein the well casing is indicated by reference character SI and the seal, corresponding to the ring assembly I3 oi Figs. l and 2, is indicated by reference character 32. Likewise a cylinder 33, corresponding to cylinder I6 of Figs. l and 2, is formed on its lower end with an irreversible inlet port' 3l? with closure 35' which, when open, permits water to enter cylinder 33 around the arched portion 36. Arche'd vportion 36, unlike its counterpart II in Figs;

and 3, provides a support forl inner cylinder 31.

Mounted within cylinder 33 is piston assembly 38 provided with irreversible outlet ports 35i with vclosures 4U and depending piston rod fII. YYAt the .lower end of piston 4I is' piston assembly 42 slide'- ably mounted in cylinder 31. ibe provided, if desired, to prevent sand or other material from interfering with the operation of A shield 43 may piston L32.

The operation of the modification shown in iFig's. 3 and 4 is as follows:

On the downward stroke of the water column 'the piston and rod assembly 38, 4I and 42 moves from the normal position shown in Fig. 3`to the jposition shown in Fig. 4, thereby compressing the vin volume and the liquid thus displaced passes lupwardly through ports`35; Simultaneously the :air inthe lower portion of cylinder '31 is com'- pressed.

When the downward'stroke of the' water column is completed and the downwardV pressure thereon is released, the'compr'essed air'in cylinder: 31 forces the piston assembly back' to the'initial position, illustrated4 in Fig.v 3. As this upward' movement takes place the valves 4"`are'closed, thus lifting the water column, andthe valve-35 open to draw a fresh increment of water'into1` cylinder 33.

Air supply line M, correspondingV tol the' air tube I9 of Fig. 1, or similar expedients `such as hereinabove described may be employed to main-j tain the desired air pressure'in cylinder 31.

I claim:

l. A pump assembly comprising a cylinder 'having an open upper end, an irreversible inlet 4at its* lower end, a rod extending upwardly'from thej lower end and terminatingbelowtheupper end,A a sealing cup on the upper end vvo said rod, a' movable piston assembly comprising-7asecond' cylinder with closed upperend Vslidably'1no1'.1ntedl around said cupr and extending abovesaid cup to provide an air chamber andbelow saidcup, its lowerend'being open,'a sealing-'cup "mounted on the upper end of said second cylinder and in' 'I'li`L inl-a Wellcasing'ior 'operationby changes in pres-VY sliding relation with the upper end of the first cylinder, irreversible outlets in said second sealing cup, means for maintaining a predetermined pressure of air in said air chamber, said assembly adapted for positioning within a well casing and its piston assembly for reciprocation to move liquid upwardly. y y ,l

2. A pump assembly comprising an outer stationary cylinder, an irreversible inlet at the bottom thereof, an inner movable cylinder closed at its upper end, a piston head secured to the inner cylinder and in sliding sealed relation with the outervcylinder to provide a liquid chamber between the two cylinders, an irreversible outlet through said piston head, a piston within the second cylinder and affixed to the nrst cylinder providing a closed air chamber within the second cylinder adapted to be decreased in volume by the downward movement of the inner cylinder, said assembly being adapted for positioning withina well casing andV its movable cylinder to be reciprocatedY by variations of pressure therein.

3. A pump assembly comprising an outer stationary cylinder, an irreversible inlet at the bottom thereof, an inner movable cylinder closed at its upper end, a piston head secured to the inner cylinder and in sliding sealed relation with the outer cylinder to provide a liquid chamber between the two cylinders, an irreversible outlet through said piston head, a piston within the second cylinder and ainxed to the iii-st cylinder providing la closed air chamber within the second cylinder adapted to` be decreased in volume by the downward movement oi the inner cylinder to provide a oompressible air cushion for returning the movable cylinder to its uppermost position and means for maintaining the desired volume of air in said air chamber, said assembly being adapted for positioning within a well casing `and its movable cylinder to bew depressed by an increase of pressure within the casing. v

4. In a pump assembly adapted to l'oe positioned in a well casing for operation byn changesV in pressure therein, the improvement that comprises an outer cylinder, an irreversible inlet' to said cylinder, a rigid piston secured tov and within said cylinder, a movable smaller cylinder with closed upper end slidably mounted around said piston in sealed relation to form a closed air chamber within the second cylinder, a piston head secured to the inner cylinder and slidably mounted within the larger cylinder and an irreversible outlet through vsaid piston head, whereby when the smaller cylinder and associated piston head is moved downwardly by pressure within the casing the outlet will be opened and the air chamber decreased in volume to compress air therein and when moved upwardly by the air compressed inl said air chamber the said inlet will be opened.

l 5. In apump assembly adapted to be positioned insa well casing foroperation by changes in pressure therein, .theV improvement that comprises an outer'cylinder, an irreversible inlet' to said cylinder, a vrigid piston secured' to vand within said cylinder, a movable smaller cylinder with closed upper end slidably mounted around said pistonl in sealedv relationA to form a closed air chamber within the second cylinder, a piston head secured to the inner mounted within the larger cylinder, an irreversible Voutlet through said piston head andv means for maintaining the desired amount of air in said air chamber. )Y Y 6. In a Vpump assembly adapted to be positioned cylinder and slidably sure therein, the improvement that comprises an outer cylinder, a closure at its lower end, an irreversible inlet through said closure, a piston of smaller diameter than said cylinder secured thereto and extending upwardly therein, a piston head movably mounted within said cylinder, an irreversible outlet therethrough and a second cylinder of smaller diameter than the rst with closed upper end secured to said piston head and depending therefrom and receiving said piston in reciprocal relation to form a closed air chamber of variable size between the piston and the closed upper end of the tube to provide a compressible air cushion acting against the piston head.

7. In a pump assembly adapted to be positioned in a well casing for operation by changes in pressure therein, the improvement that comprises an outer cylinder, a closure at its lower end, an irreversible inlet through said closure, a piston of smaller diameter than said cylinder secured thereto and extending upwardly therein, a piston head movably mounted within said cylinder, an irreversible outlet therethrough and a second cylinder of smaller diameter than the iirst with closed upper end secured to said piston head and depending therefrom and receiving said piston in reciprocal relation to form a closed air chamber of variable size between the piston and the closed upper end of the tube to provide a compressible air cushion acting against the piston head, a tube leading through said piston to said chamber, and a source of air under pressure connected with said tube.

8. A pump assembly comprising an outer cylinder rigidly mounted Within a Well casing, said outer cylinder being open at its upper end and formed with an irreversible inlet valve at its lower end, a piston in water tight engagement with and slideable within said outer cylinder, an outlet port on said piston provided with a one-way valve to permit passage of liquid toward the upper end of the cylinder, an inner cylinder mounted within the outer cylinder, said inner cylinder being of substantially less diameter than the outer cylinder and closed at one end, a piston in water tight engagement with and slideable within said inner cylinder, said piston forming a gas chamber between it and the closed end of the cylinder, and means for maintaining predetermined pressure in said gas chamber, a movable connection between said gas chamber and the piston in the outer chamber whereby a predominant pressure in the gas chamber will move said piston toward the upper end of the outer cylinder.

9. A pump assembly comprising an outer stationary cylinder, an irreversible inlet at the bottom thereof, an inner cylinder closed at its lower end and rigidly secured at said end to the lower portion of the outer cylinder, a piston head secured to the outer cylinder and a piston head secured to the inner cylinder each piston head being in sliding sealed relation with its respective cylinder, a rigid connection between said two piston heads, and an irreversible port in the piston head on the outer cylinder for passage of liquid upward therethrough, the inner cylinder providing an airtight chamber below its piston head adapted to be decreased in volume by the downward movement of said piston to provide a compressed air cushion for returning the piston to its uppermost position when downward pressure against piston head is released.

ARNOLD S. SOBERG.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name v Date 436,708 Hearn Sept. 16, 1890 .Y 1,961,602 Squires Junev15, 1934

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US436708 *Mar 6, 1890Sep 16, 1890 William j
US1961602 *Dec 31, 1928Jun 5, 1934Hydraulic Deep Well Pump CompaPumping system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3030893 *Mar 21, 1958Apr 24, 1962Donald U ShafferWave motion actuated hydraulic pump
US3080821 *Sep 25, 1959Mar 12, 1963Scott & Williams IncPumps
US3301470 *Jul 1, 1966Jan 31, 1967Danfoss AsRefrigeration compressor capacity and loading control means
US3304871 *Apr 20, 1965Feb 21, 1967Elva J ScrogginsPump assembly
US4013385 *Jun 6, 1975Mar 22, 1977Peterson Fred MDeep well pump system
US4297088 *Sep 7, 1979Oct 27, 1981Baker International CorporationPump assembly comprising gas spring means
US4492528 *Apr 6, 1983Jan 8, 1985Bentley Arthur PPressure balanced liquid elevating mechanism
US4683945 *Feb 18, 1986Aug 4, 1987Rozsa Istvan KAbove ground--below ground pump apparatus
US4720247 *Nov 14, 1986Jan 19, 1988Landell International Company, Inc.Oil well pump
US5207726 *Aug 6, 1991May 4, 1993Christopher RathwegHydraulic pump
US6155803 *Apr 8, 1999Dec 5, 2000Downhole Technologies Co., L.L.C.Rodless pumping system
US7144232Dec 2, 2003Dec 5, 2006Locher Ben CWater well pump
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/378, 92/134, 417/392
International ClassificationF04B47/00, F04B47/08
Cooperative ClassificationF04B47/08
European ClassificationF04B47/08