Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2564515 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 14, 1951
Filing dateSep 10, 1947
Priority dateSep 11, 1946
Publication numberUS 2564515 A, US 2564515A, US-A-2564515, US2564515 A, US2564515A
InventorsVogel Walter
Original AssigneeVogel Walter
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Magnetic separator for obtaining magnetic particles from liquids
US 2564515 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 14, 1951 w, VOGEL MAGNETIC SEPARATOR FOR OBTAINING MAGNETIC PARTICLES FROM LIQUIDS Filed Sept. 10, 1947 INVENTOR. hlz 'er Vgel BY Patented Aug. 14, 1951 MAGNETIC .SEPARATOR FOR OBTAINING MAGNETIC PARTICLES FROM LIQUIDS Walter Vogel, Santiago, Chile Application September 10, 1947, Serial No. 773,134 In Switzerland September 11, 1946 10 Claims.

This invention concerns a magnetic separator for recovering magnetic particles from liquids, and it is particularly designed for heavy liquid installations, utilizing a fine ground magnetic solid, as, for instance magnetite. In this art, in installations of this type, it has been proposed to either feed the liquid from above the rotating drum against the rotating direction, or to feed the same into a tank in which the rotating drum is submerged. In both cases the magnetic solids are attracted from the liquid to the drum and taken with the drum to be removed on the other downward moving side of the drum by'adequate means such as scrapers or brushes. It is also known to dispose an endless belt around the drum and which belt carries the magnetic material and discharges it.

A disadvantage of this procedure is that the magnetic material takes up too much liquid, so that this material is obtained in a much too diluted form; thus special de-watering provisions become necessary.

n the other hand, according to this invention, the magnetic separator allows efficient de-watering during the drum movement, on the upper part of the drum. This procedure does not require any special devices for thickening the heavy liquids coming from the separator. On the other hand, it is possible to provide all the means necessary for carrying these heavy liquids after passing the separator, in troughs, pipes and tanks, therefore making the separator more compact, lighter and cheaper.

The separator, according to this invention, consists principally in providing a device acting with an elastic pressure from above and against the magnetic material carried upwards by the drum just before the material reaches the culmination point, that is the high point of the arc of rotation described by the drum periphery.

The invention will now be particularly described with reference to the accompanying draw-- ings illustrating three modifications and in which:

Figure 1 illustrates a cross section through an apparatus constructed in accordance with the first modification;

Figure 2 is a partial elevational view and partial sectional view looking from the right of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a partial sectional view 01' an apparatus illustrating a second modification;

Figure 4 is a partial sectional and partial elevational view looking from the right 01' the modiflcation shown in Figure 3; and

Figure 5 is a view similar to Figure 3 illustrating the thirdmodification.

As illustrated in Figure 1 the liquid which contains the magnetic solids to be recovered is fed by means of a trough I to a relatively small coni- 2 Y cal reservoir 3. The reservoir has nearly the same width as the rotatable drum 2 mounted therebeneath and the cross sectional area of this reservoir narrows downwardly so that the liquid is issuing therefrom in a comparatively thin stream or sheet throughout substantially the width of the drum. Extending from the bottom of the reservoir 3 is a sheet 4 which as indicated is bent cylindrically to provide a liquid receiving surface over which the liquid and the magnetic solids therein flow toward a discharge lip at the terminal end of the sheet 4 in a path that is concentric with the drum. In this manner the liquid is exposed to the magnetic field while it i passing over the sheet. The magnetic solids are, thus, attracted first to the surface of sheet 4, and, after passing the lip thereof, are attracted by drum 2 which is rotating in the direction of the arrow X, and carries this material upwards. The material not attracted falls with the liquid into tank 5 in which liquid level is such that approximately half of the drum is submerged. Magnetic materialswhich reach this tank, are attracted by the lower partof the rotating drum and are likewise carried upwardly out of the tank. Cooperating with the opposite or downwardly moving side of the drum 2 there attracted thereby and carried therewith in is mounted a scraper sheet 6 that removes the magnetic material cake and discharges the same into trough l. The liquid together with the nonmagnetic material that isbelow the drum axis passes from the tank over an overflow wall 8.

As shown in the drawing, the scraper sheet 6 is pivotally mounted and constitutes a pendulum scraper and connected to and depending from the scraper sheet 6 is a bailie sheet 9 of a length such that a portion of it is submerged in the liquid. This sheet 9 is disposed between the over- :tlow wall 8 and the periphery of the drum 2 and functions to prevent, magnetic material that might pass beneath the scraper sheet 6 from being carried out of the tank with the over-- flowing liquid and thus from passing behind the sheet 9. Any magnetic material which for one reason or another has not been removed by the scraper sheet 6 is constrained by the sheet 9 to pass close to the periphery of the drum 2 to be its rotation for subsequent removal.

A roller l0, located above the drum, on the upwards moving side, slightly in advance of the culmination point, that is the high point of the arc of rotation described by the periphery of the drum, is the means for effecting by an elastic pressure from above the de-watering of the material carried upwards by the magnetic drum.

This roller I0 is located at a certain distance 3 from' theadrum 2, thus forming a convergent throat between the periphery of the drum and the periphery of the roller Ill. The shaft ll of roller III is provided with friction wheels l2 contacting the magnetic drum, as shown in Figure 2. Thus the roller III turns in the opposite direction with regard to the direction of rotation of the drum 2, whereby the material which passes between the drum 2 and the roller I is de-watered. Preferably, the roller II] should be made of soft rubber or can be constituted by a pneumatic balloon.

The solution according to Figure 3 contemplates, instead of the roller It), a sheet ll, hinged on one side and inclined towards the drum IS on the other side, at which end bolts l5 are disposed. These bolts |5 hold, with their heads l6, jackets ll. These jackets I! are distributed along sheet II and are connected with screws l8 pivoted to the under surface of trough I. The boltheads I allow a certain upward movement 01' sheet H. The width of the throat, between drum l3 and sheet ll, can be regulated by turning jackets ll. When too much material enters the crevice, the sheet it yields in an upward direction.

The solution according to Figure 5 provides a means of de-watering by a spring sheet ID. This sheet, slightly inclined towards drum 20, is entirely fixed on one side and free on the other, which is bent upwards. The width of the throat can be regulated by set screws 2|, mounted in a bracket 22, and pushing against the sheet l9. This bracket 22 can preferably be used to mount the fixed side of spring sheet is.

The spring sheet l9 adjusts itself to the thickness of material surface passing through the crevice and effects an even de-watering even when the materials are unevenly distributed.

What I claim is:

1. A separator for recovering magnetic materials from liquids with solid materials in suspension comprising a magnetic drum rotating in a liquid tank against the liquid flow, means to introduce the liquid from one side of the drum, an overflow disposed on the opposite side of the drum, means for pressing elastically the cake of magnetic materials carried upwards, disposed just below the culmination point of the drum, thus dewatering the magnetic materials, and a scraper disposed on the downwardly moving side of the drum discharging the magnetic materials, this scraper having on its underside a sheet immersed in the liquid before the overflow which prevents the dropping of magnetic I 4 pulp into the overflow and directs these particles towards the drum within the magnetic field.

2. In a device for removing from a liquid magnetic particles in suspension therein, the combination of a liquid tank; a magnetic drum rotatable about a horizontal axis inside said tank, said drum extending upwardly out of said tank; means to supply the liquid with the suspended particles, in an arcuate stream concentric with said drum, said stream flowing downwardly over the upwardly moving side of the rotated drum, to efiect deposit of a layer of said particles on said drum; and means for applying sufllcient pressure to said layer to remove said liquid from said layer, said pressure applying means being spaced relative to the top of the drum and including a surface disposed so as to provide a convergent throat to receive said layer.

3. A separator for recovering magnetic materials from liquids with solid materials in sus- 4 pension comprising a magnetic drum rotatin in a liquid tank against the liquid flow, means to introduce the liquid from one side 01' the drum, an overflow disposed on the opposite side of the drum, means for pressing elastically the cake of magnetic materials carried upwards, disposed just below the culmination point of the drum, thus de-watering the magnetic materials, said means being so disposed to said drum as to provide a convergent throat to receive the cake of magnetic material, and a scraper disposed on the downwardly moving side of the drum discharging the magnetic materials, this scraper having on its underside a sheet immersed in the liquid before the overflow which prevents the dropping of magnetic pulp into the overflow and directs these particles towards the drum within the magnetic field.

4. A device according to claim 3 in which said pressure applying means consists of a rotatable roller of yielding material.

5. A device according to claim 3 in which said pressure applying means consists of a rotatable roller having a covering of yielding material.

6. A device according to claim 3 in which said pressure applying means consists of a rotatable roller provided with means for rotating said roller in the direction opposite to the direction of rotation of said drum.

7. A device according to claim 3 in which said pressure applying means consists of a plate having one end hinged on said supplying means and its other end yieldingly mounted adjacent said drum.

8. A device according to claim 3 in which said pressure applying means is adjustable to vary the size of said throat.

9. A device according to claim 3 in which said pressure applying means consists of a resilient plate having one end fixed on said supplying means and its other end projecting adjacent said drum.

10. In a device for removing from a liquid magnetic particles in suspension therein, the combination of a liquid tank having an over-flow lip;

- a magnetic drum rotatable about a horizontal axis inside said tank, said drum extending upwardly out of said tank; means to supply the liquid with the suspended particles, in an arcuate stream concentric with said drum, said stream flowing downwardly over the upwardly moving side of the rotated drum, to effect deposit of a layer of said particles on said drum; means for removing said layer from said drum; and a plate depending from said removing means and disposed between said drum and said over-flow lip and depending below the said lip, whereby such particles 01' said layer as have not been removed by said removing means are prevented from escaping over said over-flow lip and are directed toward said drum.

WALTER VOGEL.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the flle of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Germany Mar. 22, 1939

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US438897 *Aug 29, 1890Oct 21, 1890 Magnetic separator for paper-pulp
US2230344 *Oct 22, 1938Feb 4, 1941Norbert S GarbischMethod of removing magnetic impurities from finely divided materials
DE673477C *Apr 2, 1937Mar 22, 1939Krupp Fried Grusonwerk AgVerfahren und Vorrichtung zum Scheiden von magnetisierbarem Gut
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2661092 *Mar 8, 1950Dec 1, 1953Dings Magnetic Separator CoEndless belt magnetic separator
US2675918 *May 7, 1951Apr 20, 1954Jeffrey Mfg CoMagnetic separator
US2693279 *Apr 21, 1951Nov 2, 1954Electromagnets LtdImprovement relating to magnetic floor sweepers
US2717080 *Nov 26, 1951Sep 6, 1955Sundstrand Magnetic Products CMagnetic separator
US2729333 *Feb 21, 1952Jan 3, 1956Houdaille Hershey Of Indiana IDischarge chute assembly for magnetic clarifier
US2735550 *Jan 4, 1952Feb 21, 1956 Method and device for magnetic
US2771995 *Nov 27, 1953Nov 27, 1956Jaruza A G Chur SocMagnetic separator
US2772778 *Apr 16, 1954Dec 4, 1956Indiana Commercial Filters CorUniversal magnetic clarifier
US3086718 *Apr 6, 1959Apr 23, 1963W E Plechaty CoMethod and apparatus for separating metallic particles
US3341021 *May 5, 1964Sep 12, 1967Barnes Drill CoMagnetic separator
US3522883 *Apr 26, 1968Aug 4, 1970Electronic Memories & MagneticDewatering device for wet magnetic drum separator
US3804256 *Aug 14, 1972Apr 16, 1974Barnes Drill CoMagnetic separator with improved squeegee roller
US3960716 *Dec 6, 1973Jun 1, 1976Heinrich SpodigMagnetic separator
US4042492 *Jan 5, 1976Aug 16, 1977Klockner-Humboldt-Deutz AktiengesellschaftApparatus for the separation of magnetizable particles from a fine granular solid
US4293410 *Sep 13, 1979Oct 6, 1981Hans Streuli AgMagnetic filter
US4686035 *Jul 24, 1985Aug 11, 1987Barnes Drill Co.Cylindrical drum magnetic separator
US4921597 *Sep 8, 1989May 1, 1990Cli International Enterprises, Inc.Magnetic separators
US5377845 *May 29, 1992Jan 3, 1995Sala International AbMethod of separating pulp containing magnetic constituents in a wet-magnetic, low-intensity concurrent separator and apparatus therefor
US6117318 *Nov 6, 1998Sep 12, 2000Emerson Electric Co.Rotating motorized conveyor pulley drum having a magnetic particulate trap
US7022224 *Oct 17, 2002Apr 4, 2006Aleksei Alekseevich StafeevMagnetic hydroseparator
US8470172Sep 8, 2009Jun 25, 2013Siemens Industry, Inc.System for enhancing a wastewater treatment process
US8506800May 1, 2012Aug 13, 2013Siemens Industry, Inc.System for enhancing a wastewater treatment process
US8540877Sep 26, 2012Sep 24, 2013Siemens Water Technologies LlcBallasted sequencing batch reactor system and method for treating wastewater
US8623205Sep 26, 2012Jan 7, 2014Siemens Water Technologies LlcBallasted anaerobic system
US8673142Jul 19, 2013Mar 18, 2014Siemens Water Technologies LlcSystem for enhancing a wastewater treatment process
US8702987May 31, 2013Apr 22, 2014Evoqua Water Technologies LlcMethods for enhancing a wastewater treatment process
US8840786Jan 9, 2008Sep 23, 2014Evoqua Water Technologies LlcSystem and method for removing dissolved contaminants, particulate contaminants, and oil contaminants from industrial waste water
Classifications
U.S. Classification209/219, 209/223.2, 209/39, 210/222, 209/232, 209/229
International ClassificationB03C1/10
Cooperative ClassificationB03C2201/18, B03C1/10
European ClassificationB03C1/10