Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2565075 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 21, 1951
Filing dateDec 31, 1948
Priority dateDec 31, 1948
Publication numberUS 2565075 A, US 2565075A, US-A-2565075, US2565075 A, US2565075A
InventorsHarcharek Joseph M
Original AssigneeHarcharek Joseph M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical plug receptacle for remote control of loads
US 2565075 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 21, 1951 J. M. HARCHAREK 2,565,075

ELECTRICAL PLUG RECEPTACLE FOR REMOTE CONTROL OF LOADS Filed Dec. 51, 1948 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 F76. 1. F/ G. 2.

. i1 F l/vfl 27 Z7 i a T 3/ "r"-T U'T'll'll F I INVENTOR. JOSE PH M. HAECHABE C BY y/ wwfimzvmm Aug. 21, 1951 J M. HARCHAREK 2,565,075

ELECTRICAL PLUG RECEPTACLE F OR REMOTE CONTROL OF LOADS- Filed Dec. 31, 1948 2 Sheets-Sheet 2- H h 236 A QE 5 D 7 tdsz 50 I //h F/ G. 8. QE E121: 30 3o INVENTOR. JOSEPH M. finecflnes/g Mz'a am Patented Aug. 21, 1951 ELECTRICAL PLUG RECEPTACLE FOR REMOTE CONTROL OF LOADS Joseph M. Harcharek, Upper Darby, Pa.

Application December 31, 1948, Serial No. 68,595

3 Claims.

This invention relates to electrical plug receptacles, and more particularly to a plug receptacle providing means for connecting a switch or other device in series with a load, so that the load may be remotely controlled.

A main object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved plug receptacle enabling switches or other control devices to be inserted in series with a load device without breaking the line cord wires leading to the load device, whereby said load device may be conveniently controlled from one or more points remote therefrom.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved plug connector device which can be included in an electrical circuit to establish remote control circuits for a load without the use of tools and in a simple manner, said connector device including means for establishing connections with loads additional to that being remotely controlled.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description and claims, and from the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 is a vertical cross-sectional view, taken on line ll of Figure 2, showing the internal details of a plug receptacle device constructed in accordance with the present invention.

Figure 2 is a vertical cross-sectional view taken through the device of Figure 1, on line 22 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is an elevational view of a plug which fits into the receptacle openings of the device shown in Figures 1 and 2.

Figure 4 is a bottom plan view of the plug illustrated in Figure 3.

Figure 5 is a combined perspective view and schematic diagram showing how the electrical conductors of the structure shown in Figures 1 to 4 are connected into an electrical load circuit.

Figure 6 is a view showing the pre-engaging relationship between the plug receptacle device of Figures 1 and 2, a multiplicity of plugs such as shown in Figures 3 and 4, and a wall receptacle.

Figure '7 is a combined perspective view and schematic diagram similar to Figure 5 but employing a modified form of plug receptacle device in accordance with the present invention.

Figure 8 is a view similar to Figure 6 but showing a still further modified form of the present invention.

Figure 9 is a view similar to Figure 6 but showing how the plug receptacle of either Figure l or Figure 7 may be employed with a screw-type socket.

Referring to the drawings, numerals H and I2 designate metallic prong conductors of standard size and spacing for engaging into electrical connection with commonly used Wall plug receptacles, such as is designated by numeral [3 of Figure 6. Designated at I4 is a metallic bar conductor extending at right angles to prong ll, mechanically and electrically connected thereto by any suitable rigid securing means such as rivets, welds, or bracing. Designated at I6 is a metallic bar conductor extending parallel to and spaced from bar conductor I4. Conductor I5 is connected to prong 12 by means of a strap bar I5 bridging bar 14, as shown in Figure 2. Connected to and depending from bar 16 is a hooked spring female contact bar ll. The adjacent ends of bars l4 and I6 are also formed to define spring contact elements having the same standard spacing as prongs II and [2, whereby they may be employed as female contact elements for standard electric plugs, as will be subsequently described.

Designated at I8 is a female contact bar located adjacent to one end of bar It on the side opposite to bar l4. Secured to bar [8 and extending at right angles thereto is a female contact bar 19 extending parallel to bar I! on one side thereof. Designated at 2| is a female contact bar located adjacent the other end of bar [6. Secured to bar 2| and extending at right angles thereto is a female contact bar 20 extending parallel to bar I! on the side opposite to bar l9. Thus there is defined three female contact systems each being engageable by the prongs of a plug such as is shown in Figures 3 and 4 at 30, said plug having the prongs 22, 23 and 24. The prongs 22, 23 and 24 may engage the respective female contact elements l1, l9 and 20 or the respective female contact elements at the two opposite lateral sides of the plug receptacle device.

The conductors shown in Figures 1 and 2 are supported mechanically and are simultaneously insulated electrically from each other wherever necessary by body members, shown at 25 and 26 of suitable insulating material such as plastic, ceramic, or the like, said body members being held together by suitable means such as. bolts 2! and nuts 28. The body members are formed with suitable grooves or recesses for receiving the pre-assembled conductors prior to the assembly of the aforesaid body members, said recesses defining wall apertures adjacent the respective female contact elements wherein the prongs of the plugs 30 may be received.

If so desired, the conductors may be molded into 3 a single body member formed with openings at the respective female contact elements.

In employing the plug receptacle device, the prongs II and [2 may be inserted into a conventional Wall receptacle, whereby said prongs are connected to a power line, as shown in Figure 5. The load, which may be a lamp or other appliance is designated at 29. Said' load is provided with a conventional line cord having atwo-prong plug which is plugged into the device at female contact elements ll and I9. is a single pole double throw switch having. a three wire line cord provided with a plug. 3.9.. This plug is inserted in the device at the female contact elements at one lateral side of the device, thereby engaging bars I8, lfiand I4 to establish the circuit shown at the left side of Figure 5. From Figure 5 it will be seen that the pole of switch 30' may be employed to electrically connectfemale element It to either'contactbar" l4, whereby the load 29 is energized, or to bar; l6, whereby the. loadis shunted and deenergized. The. load may be in one part of a room and'the switchfill' may be in another part of the room, therebyaffording remote control of the load.

If the load is. instead-connected to female contact elements [9 and 2 3, as. shown indottedv view at, 29 in Figure 5,.and an additionalsingle poledoublethrow switch 3!- is employed, connected to the side of. the. receptacle. device opposite. to switch. 35)." in themannerjshown at the right side of Figure 5., the load 29 may be controlled from either: switch 3|! or switch 3 i.

It will be noted that in accordance with the Wiring scheme of Figure5, the; pole of switch 3.0 is connected tofemalecontact element i8, one stationary contact. thereof is connected to bar 16', and the other stationary contact thereof is connected to. bar it. Similarly the pole of switch 3|. is connectedto female element 21: and the stationary contacts thereof are respectively con nected'toxbars: l6 and Ill. -When only one switch isemployed, the. connection to bar It: may be omitted and the load will be energized from female contact elements H and it, as shown in full line view in Figure 5,; To use two switches, the: load musti'be. disconnected from female contact H1 and connected across contacts IS and 28; as shown in. dotted view.

The: device may be. employed as an ordinary cube: tap by engaging conventional. two-prong plugs: with the: respective pairs of female; contact elements-:at: the; oppositeendsv of the bars M: and IS.

The plug receptacle may be inserted into a lamp socket such as. shown at 32 inFigure' 9, instead of: a. convenience outlet by engaging on prongs; l I and I2; a conventional screw type plug 33, which enables. the device to, be then screwed into any standard lamp socket. A female lamp socket 34' may be electrically connected to either prongs I.T and. i9: or prongs fl and 2&3, enabling a lamp 35 screwed therein to be remotely controlled from either one or two points, as? above described.

Instead of employing the standard prong spac-- ing of prongs. IE and I2 shown in Figures 1 and 6,, the prongs may be spaced apart so as to engage theouterenda prong receptacles of a double socket such as: shown at 36 in Figure 8. The prongs, shown. at H and I 2', are electrically connected to the respective conductors l4 and Hi in the same manner as; described in connection with Figure. 1, but are mechanically connected to these conductors. to provide suificient spacing so as to engage in the outer prong receptacles Designated at 3d 4 of the double socket 36. The arrangement of Figure 8 provides a centered position of the plug-in receptacle device with respect to the double socket.

Figure '7 illustrates a modified form of the plug receptacle device which provides control of a load 31 from two different locations by means of the: respective; single-pole double-throw switches 38 and 39; In the modified form of the device shown in Figure '7, the numerals M and 42 designate metallic prong conductors of standard size and spacing, Prong ll is connected by a bridging. strapsconductor G3 to a female contact element M. Prong 42 is connected by a similar bridging strapconductor 55 to a second female contactw element 46 parallel to element at. Designatedat l! and -ill are the spaced transverse conductorbars which underlie but are insulated from the strap conductors 13 and 45. Secured to prong 4i and extending at right. angles-theretodsafemalecontact. element 49, said element49 being parallel to and spaced from the left end portion of bar 4-1, as. viewedin Figure 7-. Designated at 50 is a female contact element: parallel and spaced to the. rightof the female contact element 46, as. viewed in. Figure 7. Secured to element 50 and, extending at right; angles thereto is the female contact element: 5!, which is parallel to and spaced below the right. end portion of bar 4.8, as viewedin. Figure 7. Theconductor elements are mountedin an insulating body shown in dotted view at 52.

Where. no. remotecontrol of the. load is. desired, it: may, be. connected directly to the female contact elements 44 and 46. However, if remote control of theloadis: desired,it is connected to thefemale. contactelementsdfi and 50, as shown in Figure 7, and, the respective. switches. 38 and; 3.9; are connected by suitable plugs, andcords to-the. respective left and right sides of the device. From Fig-'- ure; 7 it: will be: seen that the pole; of switch 38 is. connected; to. female contact: element 49 and the: stationary contacts thereof are; connected respectively to bars 4'! and-s8. The; pole of switch 39. is connected to female. contact element: 51 and the stationary contacts of. switch 39 are con-- nectedtoithebars: 41 and4'8. Itrwill be seenfrom' Figure 7 that. one terminal of. the load is connected through contact element 46, strap 25 and prong 42 to one of .the power supply wires; the other power supply line wire may be connected to either conductor 4.1 or 4'3 by means of the movable poleof switch 3135.. The remaining terminal of the load 31 is connected through conl tact element 50, and contact element 55 to the pole of switch 39. The pole of switch 39 may be moved into electrical connection with either condu'ctor' 41 or 48. With switch 38 in a given position, the load may therefore be controlled by switch 38;- conversely, with switch 39' in a given position, saidload may be controlled by switch 38.

While certain specific embodiments of plug-inreceptacles for providing remote control of an electrical load have been disclosed in the foregoing description, it will be understood that various modifications within the spirit of the invention may occur to those skilled in the art. Therefore, it is intended that no limitations be placed onthe invention except as defined by the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

I. A plug-in receptacle device of the character described comprising an insulating body member, a pair of parallel conductor bars secured in said body member, a pair of spaced prongs secured respectively to said conductor bars and projecting outwardly from one face of the body member, a first female contact element secured to one of the conductor bars within the body member and extending toward the opposite face of the body member, a second female contact element located Within the body member parallel to said first female contact element, a third female contact element secured within the body member to said second female contact element and extending toward a lateral face of the body member and being parallel to an end portion of said one conductor bar, a fourth female contact element located within the body member parallel to said first female contact element, a fifth female contact element secured within the body member to said fourth contact element and extending toward a lateral face of the body member and being parallel to another end portion of said one conductor bar, the respective ends of the conductor bars being formed to define female contact elements and the body member being recessed adjacent the respective female contact elements to define apertures for the insertion of plugs, said conductor bars, prongs and first, second, third, fourth and fifth female contact elements being formed of flat bar stock and their axes lying substantially in the same plane.

2. A plug-in receptacle device of the character described comprising an insulating body member, a pair of parallel conductor bars secured in said body member and extending substantially from one lateral face of the body member to the other, a pair of spaced prongs secured respectively to said conductor bars and projecting outwardly from the rear face of the body member, a first female contact element secured to one of the conductor bars within the body member and extending adjacent the front face thereof, a second female contact element located within the body member parallel to said first female contact element, a third female contact element secured within the body member to said second female element and extending adjacent one lateral face of said body member and extending parallel to one end portion of said one conductor bar but lying in a plane at right angles thereto, a fourth female contact element located within the body member extending parallel to and spaced from the first female contact element opposite to the second female contact element but lying in a plane at right angles to said first female contact element, and a fifth female contact element secured within the body member to said fourth female contact element extending adjacent the remaining lateral face of the body member and extending parallel to the adjacent end portion of said one conductor bar but lying in a plane at right angles thereto, the ends of the conductor bars being formed to define female contact elements and the body member being recessed adjacent to the respective female contact elements to define apertures for the admission of prongs, said conductor bars, prongs and first, second, third, fourth and fifth female contact elements being formed of flat bar stock and their axes lying substantially in the same plane, the planes of said spaced prongs being perpendicular to the planes of said conductor bars.

3. A plug-in receptacle device of the character described comprising a pair of parallel conductor bars, a pair of parallel prongs connected respectively to the conductor bars and projecting respectively at right angles thereto, a first female contact bar projecting from one of the conductor bars at right angles thereto in a direction opposite to that of said prongs, a first set of female contact bars spaced on opposite sides of the first female contact bar and extending parallel thereto, and a second set of female contact bars secured respectively to the inner ends of the first set of female contact bars and extending parallel and adjacent to the end portions of said one conductor bar, the respective ends of the conductor bars being formed to define female contact elements, said conductor bars, prongs and first and second sets of female contact bars being formed of flat bar stock and their axes lying substantially in the same plane, the planes of said spaced prongs being perpendicular to the planes of said conductor bars, at least one of said first set of female contact bars lying in a plane at right angles to the planes of the other of said first set of female contact bars, and said second set of female contact bars lying in a plane at right angles to the plane of said one conductor bar.

JOSEPH M. HARCHAREK.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1188220 *Jul 30, 1914Jun 20, 1916Etsno TamuraElectrical device.
US2477862 *Aug 4, 1947Aug 2, 1949Cook Charles RHouse wiring circuit
GB466935A * Title not available
GB191201264A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2706225 *Sep 2, 1952Apr 12, 1955 Remote control adapter switch
US2851550 *Mar 4, 1957Sep 9, 1958Searcy Luther ARemote control switch for electrical appliances
US2994849 *Dec 26, 1957Aug 1, 1961Mussari Jr JosephElectrical plug-in connector
US3018463 *Jul 23, 1956Jan 23, 1962Ite Circuit Breaker LtdConnecting means for electrical conductors embedded in an insulating housing
US3246179 *Dec 28, 1962Apr 12, 1966Francis H Gates SrElectrical outlet having double throw switch for connection to power line through alternate circuit paths
US3334250 *Aug 8, 1966Aug 1, 1967Gwin Jr Robert CElectrical switch system
US3349363 *Dec 10, 1965Oct 24, 1967Goodman Ronald DElectrical plug unit embodying duplex outlets
US3418488 *Oct 23, 1965Dec 24, 1968Lon H RomanskiSwitching circuit
US3474396 *Oct 12, 1967Oct 21, 1969CometaBase for plug-in electric or electronic assemblies or sub-assemblies
US3484735 *Sep 30, 1968Dec 16, 1969Coleman Cable & Wire CoElectric terminal adapter
US3521216 *Jun 19, 1968Jul 21, 1970Tolegian Manuel JerairMagnetic plug and socket assembly
US4313646 *Feb 25, 1980Feb 2, 1982Amp IncorporatedPower distribution system
US4498716 *Apr 1, 1982Feb 12, 1985Ward Marvin WData monitoring connector for testing transmission links
US4672234 *Oct 23, 1985Jun 9, 1987Airmaster Fan CompanySwitch system for overhead electric cords
US5383799 *Mar 26, 1993Jan 24, 1995Fladung; Philip E.Multi-purpose plug-in electrical outlet adaptor
US7275967 *Dec 15, 2005Oct 2, 2007Olliff James WPortable power supply system and connectors therefor
US7648379Aug 11, 2008Jan 19, 2010Haworth, Inc.Modular electrical distribution system for a building
US7697268Aug 11, 2008Apr 13, 2010Haworth, Inc.Modular electrical distribution system for a building
US7826202Aug 11, 2008Nov 2, 2010Haworth, Inc.Modular electrical distribution system for a building
US7841878Aug 11, 2008Nov 30, 2010Haworth, Inc.Modular electrical distribution system for a building
US8172588Apr 9, 2010May 8, 2012Haworth, Inc.Modular electrical distribution system for a building
US8172589Apr 9, 2010May 8, 2012Haworth, Inc.Modular electrical distribution system for a building
WO1985001394A1 *Sep 13, 1984Mar 28, 1985Klas HolmgrenAn electric current distributing device
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/652, 307/114, 200/51.2
International ClassificationH01R31/00, H01R29/00, H01R13/64, H01R31/02
Cooperative ClassificationH01R31/02, H01R13/64, H01R29/00
European ClassificationH01R29/00