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Publication numberUS2565912 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 28, 1951
Filing dateNov 25, 1949
Priority dateNov 25, 1949
Publication numberUS 2565912 A, US 2565912A, US-A-2565912, US2565912 A, US2565912A
InventorsDavis Edward D
Original AssigneeDavis Edward D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Water color paint set
US 2565912 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' Aug. 28, 1951 E. D. DAVIS 2,565,912 WATER COLOR PAINT SET Filed Nov. 25, 1949 '2 Sheets-Sheet 1 II II II II 1/ illi/71727200011 INVENTOR.

ATTORNEYS.

WATER COLOR PAINT SET INVENTOR.

QWMJQ BY r i ATTO-RNEYS;

Patented Aug. 28, 1951 UNITED STATES PATE NT OFFICE 13 Claims.

This invention relates to water color painting and has particular reference to novel apparatus comprising an improved water color paint set.

Conventional water color paint sets, or paint boxes are disadvantageous in several respects, particularly for use by children. The present practice is to put up the paints in cakes which fit into small pans on a shelf in the paint box. The lid of the box is generally divided into sections or panels in which the paints may be mixed. No provision is made for drainage of excess water from the pans, giving rise to the danger of undesirable mixing of paints from adjacent cakes, as well as the danger of spillage onto the work table. The mixing panels are generally quite shallowso that, here again, the danger of spillage is present.

One of the objects of my invention is, therefore, to provide a novelwater color paint set having means for drainage of excess liquids.

Another object of my invention is to provide a novel water color paint set in which a water container is made a part of the unitary assembly.

A further object of my invention is to provide a water color paint set which may be safely used by even small children, without danger of spillage of water and/or paints.

A further object of my invention is the provision of a novel Water color paint set which is simple in construction and adapted to be manufactured on a quantity basis.

Other objects and advantages of this invention it is believed will be apparent from the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment thereof as illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a top plan view of a preferred embodiment of my invention.

Figure 2 is a side elevation thereof, partly in section.

Figure 3 is a sectional view, taken substantially on the line 3-3 of Figure 1.

Figure 4 is a bottom plan view.

Referring now to the drawings, it will be seen that a preferred embodiment of my invention includes a circular palette, generally designated at In, which is supported by a water vessel l I.

The palette l may be of molded composition, preferably of plastic although other materials would be satisfactory. A number of cup-shaped wells [2 integral with the annular outer portion or shelf l3 of the palette are disposed in a circle about the circular inner portion of the palette. As shown in Figure 4, thewells may be connected together by means of webs I4 to insure ease of molding and to provide greater strength to the article. Conventional water color paints (not shown) are inserted in the wells l2, and may be either the hard, dry cake type which gradually becomes adhesive to the container or well when wetted in use, or the semi-moist type which is put into the container or well in paste form and dries therein.

Means are provided, to prevent accidental intermixing of the paints in adjacent wells and, as shown inthe drawings, this may. include the raised ribs [5, one of which is disposed between each pair of adj acentwells. I2.

The circular inner portion of thepalette I0 provides paint-mixing means which may include the mixingtrays [6. This inner portion is integrally connected tothe annular shelf l3 by means of spaced ribs l1, described more fully below. i

As shown in the drawings, andparticularly in Figure 3, anannular, downwardly-directed flange I8 is provided on the inner edge I9 of the shelf l3. The above-mentioned ribs I1 are integral with this flange 18 and extend downwardly therefrom and thence. laterally to merge ,with the circular central portion of the palette.

The outer diameter of the flange l8 is only slightly less than the inner diameter of the water vessel I I, so that the inner portion of the palette may be nested within the vessel, the palette bein supported by the rim 20 of the vessel II on the annular se'at 2| which is defined by the flange l8 and by a circle tangent to the wells [2. The water vessel Il may be of conventional shape, but is preferably slightly tapered as shown, and provided with a flanged base 22 as a safeguard against tipping.

It is to be understood that the inner portion of the palette, which provides the mixing trays I6, is depressed with respect to the shelf [3, so thatthe trays 16 may be contained inside the water vessel II and substantially below the rim thereof, as shown in Figure 2. The trays I6 are separated by the central fin 23 and enclosed by the annular dike 24 and dams or ramps 25. A substantially triangular aperture 26 is provided between the trays [6, the purpose of which will be described below. Means are provided whereby excess liquid may drain from the shelf l3, and as shown in the drawings, this may include the sloping disposition of the shelf l3, the aperture 26 and the apertures 21 between the spaced ribs [1. Any excess liquid will gravitate toward the center, then downwardly through the apertures 26 and 21 into the water vessel ll. As noted above, the raised ribs I5 prevent accidental intermixing of paints from adjacent wells I2, and further, the ribs [5 aid in channeling excess water through the apertures 2B and 21.

The paints may be mixed in the trays I6 in the customary manner, that is, by wetting the brush (through the aperture 26), taking up one of the desired colors on the brush and depositing it on one of the trays: I6, cleaning the: brush in the water, and taking up other colors and depositing them in the mixing tray in the same manner until the desired mixture is obtained. As will be understood from the above description, anyggacciderrtal spillage of paint will drain into the water vessel I I, either through the aperture 26 orapertures 2'l. The aperture 26 is substantially triangular; as shown, and is provided with a sharp apex 26a, against which the brush may be withdrawn to squeeze the excess waterstherefrom, as well as to compress thebristlesfinto a sharppoint. i'lhfi -brush .mayzbe given a broad, flatbrushing surface by drawing it against one of the straight sides of the aperture 26.

While the palette I is securely supported :by :the water vessel I l, as described above, it is to be understood thattheassembly is not permanent; the palette is easily iremovedlmerely by lifting it off the water vessel when it is desiredtochange the water therein. Thecurvedsurf-aces 28 of the damslB, bestshown in Figure 3, permit themixing trays IE to be cleane'd without removing the palette from the water vessel,:however sincethe trays may be floodedzwith clear water. and then swept :clean by brushing the water over thedams and through theaperture 26. While I have shown and described a specific embodiment of my invention, I do not limit myself to the exactdetails of .the construction .set forth, and the invention embraces such changes, modifications and equivalents of the parts and their form-ation and arrangement :as come: within the purview of the appended claims. 7 l l elaim:

'1'. In a water color paint-set, the combination of: a =water vessel, a palette supported by said water vessel above the top-edge thereof, said palette having-an aperture thereinso. that a brush maybe inserted therethroughinto the water vessel, end draihage channels I; on said palette whereby excess -liquid fiowingtherefrom will-drain into -said water-vessel.

2: In a water color paintiset, the :combination of: a :water yessel, a palettexsupported by. said water vessehabove the -top edge thereof, means on said "palette for holding a plurality, :of: #water color cakes, and separate: drainage channels on said palette from each of said means andleading to s'aid yessel whereby excesssliquid willadrain into said watervessel.

3. -In eplvater: colorapaint .set, the combination of: a water ivessel-a-having Lannpperaperipheral edge, a-palette supported by. .ssaid. ivatersvessel andextending inwardlyaover said. edge, means on said palette for. holding a plurality ofswater coloricakesgand a mixing. tray integralwith said palette and r forming. the central portionsthereof over said water :vesselpand within the boundary of 'said upper peripheral edge said. mixing itray having an aperatureitherein through which a brush mayibedipped into saidwater vessel.

4.:In a water .color. paint set,. =.the combination of: a water :vessel, apalette: supported by said WEEIJBI" vessel, means on said palette forholding a plurality of water-color cakespamixingtray inwater vessel, said-palette including an outer portion and an inner portion, said outer portion comprising a shelf adapted to retain a plurality 'of individual paint cakes, said shelf being disposed at an angle from the horizontal so that liquids thereon may gravitate toward said inner portion, said inner portion including a horizon- .talinixing tray, and a plurality of spaced ribs connecting said inner portion to said outer por- 'tiornthe apertures between said ribs providing passageways through which excess water may drain from said shelf.

6. In a water color paint set, the combination of: a water vessel and a palette supported by said :water vessel, said palette including an outer portion and an inner portion, said outer portion comprising a shelf extending laterally outwardly of said water vessel and adapted to retain a plurality of individual paint cakes, said inner portion including a'horizontal mixing tray, said mixing tray being depressed with respectto said shelf so that said mixing tray nests within the water vessel, and said inner portion having an aperture therein through which a brush maybe dipped into said water vessel.

7. .In a'water color paint set, a palette-adapted to be supported on a water vessel, said palette including an outer portion and an inner portion, said outer portion comprising a shelf adapted to retain a plurality of individual paint cakes, said shelf being disposed at an angle from the horizontal so that liquids thereon may gravitate toward said inner portion, said inner portion including a horizontal mixing tray having an aperature therein through which a brush may be dipped, and-a plurality of spaced ribs connecting said inner-portion to said outer portion, the apertures between said ribs providing passageways through which excess water may drain from said shelf and said tray.

8. Ina water color paint set, the combination of: a water vessel, a flanged base integral with the water vessel, apalette supported by said'water vessel, said palette includingan outer portion and an inner portion, said outer portion comprising a shelf extending laterally outwardly of said water vessel and having a plurality of partitioned wells therein, each adapted to retain a paint cake therein, said shelf being disposed at an angle from the horizontal sov that liquids thereon may gravitate toward said inner portion, said inner portion including a horizontallmixing tray, said mixing tray being depressed with. respect to said shelf so that said mixing tray nests within the water vessel, and a plurality of spaced ribs connecting said inner portion to saidouter portion, the apertures between said ribs' providing passageways through'which excess water may drain into said water vessel.

9. In a water color paint set, the combination of: aiwater vessel, a palette supported'by said water vessel, said palette including an outer'portion and an inner portion, said outer portion comprising an annular shelf extending laterally outwardly of said water vessel and having a plur rality of partitioned "wells therein, an annular,

downwardly directed flange forming the inside edge of said outer portion, the outer surface of said flange cooperating with said wells to define an annular seat on the underside of said shelf for the rim of said water vessel, the inner portion of said palette including a horizontal mixing tray which is depressed with respect to said shelf so that said mixing tray may nest within the Water vessel, said mixing tray having an aperture therein through which a brush may be dipped into the water vessel.

10. In a paint color set, a palette comprising an annular shelf having an annular series of paint receiving depressions projecting therebelow, a downwardly extending annular flange extending from the inner edge of the annular shelf, a tray supported at the lower edge of the annular flange, the inner edge of the shelf adjacent the downwardly extending annular flange forming a rim, the under surface of which provides a supporting surface for the support of the palette upon an annular supporting-edge and the annular flange and the downwardly projecting paint receiving depressions of the annular shelf defining a channel therebetween whereby the palette is held from lateral movement when supported by the annular rim.

11. In combination with a water container having an upstanding annular wall within which water may be confined, a point set including an annular shelf having paint receiving depressions formed therein, said paint receiving depressions extending downwardly from the bottom surf-ace of the annular shelf, the inner edge of the annular shelf providing a supporting rim upon which the shelf may be supported on the upper edge of the annular wall of the water container, a mixing tray extending downwardly from the annular shelf to a position Within the annular wall of the water container and below the upper edge thereof, means whereby the mixing tray is supported from the rim of the shelf, the latter said means and said paint receiving depressions of the tray forming together means to prevent lateral movement of the tray when supported on the edge of the water container.

12. In combination with a water container having an upstanding annular wall within which water may be confined, a paint set including an annular shelf having paint receiving depressions formed therein, said paint receiving depressions extending downwardly from the bottom surface of the annular shelf, the inner edge of the annular shelf providing a supporting rim upon which the shelf may be supported on the upper edge of the annular wall of the water container, a mixing tray extending downwardly from the annular shelf to a position within the annular wall of the water container and below the upper edge thereof, means whereby the mixing tray is supported from the rim of the shelf, the latter said means and said paint receiving depressions of the tray forming together means to prevent lateral movement of the tray when supported on the edge of the water container, and the mixing tray having an opening through which a paint brush may be inserted into the water of the water container.

13. In a water color paint set of the type adapted to be supported by an open-top water vessel and having a shelf adapted to retain a plurality of individual paint cakes, a horizontal mixing tray portion adapted to be nested within the top portion of the water vessel, said mixing tray portion comprising a pair of mixing trays separated by a central fin and enclosed by an outer raised dike and a pair of upwardly inclined ramps, said ramps intersecting to form a sharp apex and to define, with the shelf, an aperture providing access to the interior of the water vessel.

EDWARD D. DAVIS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 976,317 Triebling Nov. 22, 1910 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 462,243 Germany July 6, 1928 477,803 Great Britain Jan. 6, 1938

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US976317 *Mar 26, 1910Nov 22, 1910Alfred TrieblingColor-box.
DE462243C *Aug 17, 1927Jul 6, 1928Weghorn & RechtBei der Malfarbe angeordneter Pinselabstreifer
GB477803A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2992501 *Apr 22, 1959Jul 18, 1961David DouglasCombination palette and paint holder
US3273700 *Jan 6, 1964Sep 20, 1966 Compact faint box for painting with water colors
US3426888 *May 22, 1967Feb 11, 1969Rainbow Crafts IncColoring set
US3671992 *Sep 4, 1970Jun 27, 1972Linger Harrison KArtist{40 s tool & conditioning structure
US3983993 *Dec 4, 1975Oct 5, 1976Eic International CorporationCanteen with water color painting accessories
US4494654 *Nov 3, 1982Jan 22, 1985Pizza Hut, Inc.Salad bar insert
US4524421 *Mar 22, 1982Jun 18, 1985Quantel LimitedComputerized graphics system and method using an electronically synthesized palette
US4867332 *Oct 17, 1988Sep 19, 1989Mains Gregory TTool holder
US4901846 *Aug 25, 1989Feb 20, 1990Lehman Charles WArtist's paint carrier system
US4911642 *Jul 17, 1989Mar 27, 1990Glen KnowlesColor wheel palette
US4991711 *Mar 15, 1990Feb 12, 1991Cheng Nancy CArtist storage container having scalloped handles
US5058737 *Sep 26, 1990Oct 22, 1991Ronald PattersonPlate and glass assembly
US5176283 *Feb 7, 1992Jan 5, 1993Ronald PattersonPlate-and-glass assemblies
US5216755 *Jun 20, 1991Jun 1, 1993Quantel LimitedVideo image creation system which proportionally mixes previously created image pixel data with currently created data
US5289566 *May 28, 1993Feb 22, 1994Quantel, Ltd.Video image creation
US5292028 *Oct 26, 1992Mar 8, 1994Ronald PattersonPlate-and-glass assemblies (III)
US5325958 *Feb 4, 1993Jul 5, 1994Western Publishing Co., Inc.Combination paint tray and storage box
US5459529 *Dec 1, 1989Oct 17, 1995Quantel, Ltd.Video processing for composite images
US6138860 *Aug 26, 1997Oct 31, 2000Comeaux; Leo C.Plate and glass assembly
US6325206Jun 2, 2000Dec 4, 2001Susan StonexPainting kit
US7547211 *Mar 16, 2005Jun 16, 2009Darren Michael SwanickApparatus for blending base pigments into composite colors and method for making same
US20100314395 *Jun 10, 2009Dec 16, 2010Haden Dawn MPlate with engaging member
WO1992005079A1 *Aug 21, 1991Apr 2, 1992John W PattersonPlate and glass assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/1.7, 206/229, 206/1.8, 206/562, 222/108, 206/575, 211/126.1
International ClassificationB44D3/04
Cooperative ClassificationB44D3/04
European ClassificationB44D3/04