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Publication numberUS2566361 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 4, 1951
Filing dateJun 11, 1948
Priority dateJun 11, 1948
Publication numberUS 2566361 A, US 2566361A, US-A-2566361, US2566361 A, US2566361A
InventorsParrelli Benjamin F
Original AssigneeUnited Shoe Machinery Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making closed end shoes
US 2566361 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

B. F. PARRELLI METHOD OF MAKING CLOSED END SHOES Sept. 4, 1951 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 11, 1948 Inve nior' Berjhmzh F Pdrrelli By h 5 Sept. 4, 1951 B.'F. PARRELLI 2,566,361

METHOD OF MAKING CLOSED END SHOES Filed June 11, 1948 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 [nu enter Benjamin F ParreZlz Sept- 1951 a. F. PARRELLI 2,566,361

METHOD OF MAKING CLOSED END SHOES Filed June 11, 1948 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 a8 Inventor 40 Benjamin FfZzrrel/z 6 By rney Sept. 4, 1951 B. F. FARRELL! METHOD OF MAKING CLOSED END SHOES 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed June 11, 1948 [1721 en 2507* Be-n amim F Par/"6.4 11;

P 1951 B. F. FARRELL! 2,566,361

METHOD OF MAKING CLOSED END SHOES Filed June 11, 1948 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 5 'f I I 96 By ha After Sept. 4, 1951 B. F. PARRELLI 2,566,361

METHOD OF MAKING CLOSED END SHOES Filed June 11, 1948 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Fi 15 AK Patented Sept. 4, 1951 .METHOD OF MAKING CLOSED END SHQES Benjamin F. Parrelli, Beverly, Mass., assignor to United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Flemington, N. J a corporation of New Jersey ApplicationJune 11, 1948, SerialN 0. 32,313

12"(31aims. 1

This invention relates to a novel method of making shoes, and more particularly shoes of the slip-lasted type.

It is the general object of this invention to produce a shoe of the slip-lasted type having a closed toe as good in appearance and wearing qualities as the toe of a conventionally lasted shoe and which, at the same time, may be manufactured with economy.

The method of this invention may be practised by cutting an upper, an upper lining and a sock lining each having a lasting allowance aroundthe toe forward of the tip line, assembling the upper elements,stitching the upper elements to the sock lining rearwardly of the tip line of the shoe, inserting a last in the shoe, and then inserting a toe box between the lining and upper forward of thetip line. The shoe is then preferably presented to a toe forming machine to form the toe of the shoe, stitching is applied around the toe from tip line to tip line, and the lasting allowances are trimmed.

As will be illustrated, in order to complete the shoe, as when a shoe of the platform type is desired, the last is removed from the shoe, the front cover is attached, and the rear cover as well unless it has been earlier attached, thelast isrein- .serted in the shoe, and the bottoming of the shoe is completed.

One modification of the invention will be described wherein the relasting process is eliminated.

In order that the exact nature of this inventionmay be better understood. reference is made to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of the cut and assembled upper;

Fig. '2 is an exploded perspective View showing the assembled upper and the sock lining;

Fig.3 is aperspective'view showingthe attachmentof the upper to the sock lining;

Fig. 4 shows the attachment of the rear cover to the shoe;

Fig.5 shows a last inserted in theshoe and the portion of the upper and doubler forwarder the tipline turned back from the lining;

Fig. 6 is a view showing the toe box;

Fig. '7 shows the 'toe? box positioned over the lining ahead of the'tip line;

iF'igs. s and 19 disclose the'toe o'f'theshoeposi- I tinned relative "to the shoe support and wipers ofa toe forming machine, Fig. 8 showing a longitudinal section of the toe of the shoe and Fig. 9 a transverse section thereof;

Fig. 10 shows the stitching applied through the lasting allowances forward of the tip line and illustrates the trimming of thelasting allowances outside said stitching;

Fig. 11 shows the feed rollers, needle, thread and looper of a thread lasting machine with the toe of the shoe presented thereto;

'Fig. 12 shows the shoe with the last removed and the front cover attached thereto;

Fig. 13 is an elevation of the completed shoe;

Fig. 14 is a cross-sectional view taken on the plane l4l4 of Fig. 13;

Fig. 15 is a plan view of the front cover as it maybe made in practicing a modification of the invention;

Fig. 16 is a perspective view of a shoe showing the assembled upper attached to thesock lining rearward of the tip line, the rear cover attached and a front cover of the type disclosed in Fig. 15 attached to the shoe rearwardly of the tip "line; and

Fig. 17 is a perspective view of ashoemadeaccording to the modified process after the last has been inserted therein and the shoe presented to the toe forming and thread lasting machines.

Reference is made to Figs. 1 and 2 wherein the upper assembly is shown to include the upper 22, doubler 2t and lining 26 each of which may be composed of any suitable material. The upper, doubler and lining are each cut to have a seam allowance along their lower edges rearward of the tip'line which is defined'bythe points Aand B, and ahead of the tipline theupper. doubler and lining are provided with the respective lasting allowances 22a, 24a and 26a.

The upper 22, doubler 24 and1ining26 are assembled to form the upperassembly, theupper 22 and doubler 24 being adhesively secured to one another over their entire adjacent surfaces, and the upper lining and doubler being similarly secured to one another rearward of the tip line AB. Stitching 28 is employed to fasten theupper elements together at the top of the upper, as well as to hold the upper edge of the quarterlining'afl in position, and the. stitching'32 is employed to hold the front edge of the quarter lining tfi in the upper assembly, this stitching passing through the upper, doubler, lining and front end of the quarter lining 30 and rear end of the upper lining 26. In the practice of this invention, the doubler may be omitted from the shoe and the upper lining is necessary only in the toe of the shoe.

The sock lining 34 is out to have a seam allowance rearward of the tip line AB and a wider lasting allowance 34a forward of the tip line corresponding to the lasting allowance of the upper elements.

Having assembled the upper elements as described, the quarter lining 30 is separated from the doubler24 and a counter 36, preferably of the mulled oractivated type, is inserted in proper position in the pocket between the quarter lining 3t and doubler 24, and the quarter lining 33 is pressed against the inserted counter. The counter is preferably precutso that-it fits into the pocket between the quarter lining 33 and the doubler 24 with the bottomedge of the counter flush with the adjacent bottom edges of the quarter lining, doubler and upper.

of the last 46. A preferably mulled or activated toe box 5!], such as is shown in Fig. 6, having a lasting allowance 50a corresponding to the other described lasting allowances and a skived rear margin 52b is then laid over the free uncovered toe end of lining 26, as shown in Fig. '7. The skived margin 52?) of the toe box 56 is laid against the lining, and the toe box is cut in size and shape so that when its rear skived margin is laid along the tip line AB, the projecting edges of the box are flush with the corresponding edges of the lining. The previously turned back free toe portion of the upper and doubler are then turned forwardly and downwardly over the inserted toe box and pressed against the same.

The toe of the shoe on the last is then formed, and this step may be accomplished by presenting the shoe to a toe forming machine of the type disclosed in United States Patent No. 1,861,832

Referring to Fig. 3, the upper assembly and sock lining 34 are then joined together as by stitching 38, employing a conventional type sewing machine, the stitching 38 extending from the tip point A rearwardly around the heel of the shoe and forwardly to the tip point B; This stitching passes through the upper, doubler,

, upper lining, counter; quarter lining and sock lining and securely attaches the upper assembly 20 to the sock lining 34 rearward of the tip line AB. It should be particularly noted, however, that the upper 22' anddoubler 24 are not attached to the'lining 26 and none of the upper elements are attached to the sock lining 34 forward of the tip lineAB'. In this stitching operation the stitching allowance "on the sock lining '34 is turneddownwardly into parallel position with respect to the stitching allowances of the upper elements to produce a generally depending 'rib 40 aroundtheibottom of the shoe'rearward of theti line Turning now toFig. 4, the next step in the extends from the area of the shank at one side of the shoe rearwafdly' around the heel and then 44 passes through'thefheel cover 42 and the rib 49 so that the inside portion of stitching 44 lies along the inner side of'the rib.

As shown in Fig'.'5,'a l'ast'46 is then inserted inside the shoe, theback'seam '(not shown) is properly alined with the rear end of the last and,

if desired, a tack' 48".maybe driven through the upper into the last 46'-to'.hold the heel end of the shoe in proper position with respect to the last.

Also, if desired, the sock lining may be pulled forward of the last'by applying pincers to the lasting allowance 34a of the sock lining, and a tack (not shown) may be driven through the sock lining in the area of the shank into the last. These operations assist in shaping the still soft counter to the last and hold the heel of the shoe in proper position relatively to the last during the succeeding operations. 'The upper lining 26 may also be pulled forward of the last by the use of pincers.

The free toe ends of'the upper 22 and doubler 24 are then turned back along the tip line AB, as also shown in Fig. 5, leaving the free'toe end I of the lining 26 in engagement with the toe end process may bethe attachment'of the heel cover '42 to the shoe by means of the'stitching 44 which granted June 7, 1932 in the name of W. C. Baxter. As seen in Figs. 8 and 9 such a machine comprises the shoe support 54 which underlies the'bottom surface of the sock lining 34 and lasting allowance 34a ahead of the tip line AB. The

machine also comprises the wipers 56 having wiping surfaces 56a which engage the exterior surface of the toe of the upper 22 to wipe the same over the last 46. Thewipers are preferably heated to cause the bonding agent of the toe box to set'during the toe forming operation. When the machine is operated, the relative vertical movement of the plate 54 and wipers 56, the closing of the wipers 56 relative to the shoe, and the longitudinal relative inotionof the shoe and wipers results in a toe smoothly and tightly wiped around the last, and the wiping operation also pulls the entire shoe upper forward relative to the last to shape the same to the last. The pressure applied to the toe elementsduring the wiping process causes a flow of the bonding agent of the'toe box toimpreg'nate the adjacent areas of the doubler and upper lining. The lasting allowances are firmly pressed together in the toe forming operation, and the lasting allowances of the upper and doubler, toe box and upper lining are securely bonded by the bonding agent of the lasting allowanceof the toe box.

As illustrated, the feather line 46a of the last 46 is rounded 01f ahead of the tip line to permit the wipers 56 to wipe the upper elements into the beveled 01f corner of the last.

After the toe forming operation the shoe is left in the machine for the length of time required to perform the same operation on another shoe, during which time the formed toe of the shoe becomes set, and then the stitching 10 shown in Fig. 10 is accomplished. This stitching extends from the end of the tip line A around the toe of the shoe to the end of the tip line B and passes through the upper, doubler, toe box upper lining and sock lining. The stitching operation may be accomplished upon a thread lasting'machine of the type disclosed in United States Patent No.

1,864,510, granted June 21, 1932, in the name of B. T. Leveque, a portion of such a machine being disclosed in Fig. 11 to whichreference is now made. M a

In Fig. .11 it willbe seen that thethread lasting machine includes an upper knurled feed roller 12 driven byshaft l4 and alower' knurled feed roller 76 driven by shaft 18.

-The lasting allowances 22a, 24a, a, 26a and 34a of the upper, doubler, toe-box, upper lining and seek lining are compressed by .the feed rollers, and the stitching 10 is applied by the the tip point B around the lower margin of the upper of the toe of the completed shoe. Referring .toFig. 16 the front cover is positioned relative tothe upper 22 with the tip points A and B on the cover respectively overlying the tip points A and B on the upper,and the cover is attached to the shoe by stitching I06 which extends on each side of the shoe from the tip points A and A and B and B rearwardly to the ends of the cover I04, stitching I06 passing through the cover I04 and the depending rib 40 which, as previously described, is composed of the lower margins of the Upper, doubler, lining and the margin of the sock lining. It should be particularly noted that the cover I04 is not stitched forward of the tip points A and B, and consequently, the portion of -the cover between these two points may be moved relative to the underlying parts of the shoe. Inasmuch as the distance from the tip point A to the tip point B on the wrapper I04 is slightly less than the distancefrom the tip point-A to the tip point B around the lower margin of the upper, the lasting allowance I04a and unsewed section of thewrapper I04 will be somewhat to the rear of the position of the lasting allowance 22a of the upper, as shown in Fig. 16.

The last is next inserted in theshoe, the heel seam alined and the heel tack driven through the heel into the last. The sock lining is pulled forward and the tack driven through the sock lining in-the area of the shank, all as previously described.

v The free portion of cover I04 between the tip points A and B, the lasting allowance I040. and the free portions of the upper 22 and doubler 24 between the tip points A and B are turned back, as previously described, and the mulled or activated toe box is laid over the lining 26. The turned back portions of the doubler, upper and wrapper I04 are then turned forward and pressed downwardly against the inserted toe box, the upper 22, doubler 24 and upper lining are all pulled forward of the last by the use of pincers,

V and the cover I04, between the tip points A and ,B, is pressed downwardly, stretching the cover intermediate the tip points A and B to cause the cover to snugly fit around the toe of the last and to place the lasting allowance I04a over lasting allowance 22a of the upper.

The shoe is then presented to the toe-forming machine, as previously described, and the wipers 56 01 the toe-forming machine press against the wrapper I04 and lasting allowance I04a and the previously described movements of the toe-forming machine form the toe of the shoe. as shown in Fig. 1'7, the lasting allowance I04a being pressed against the other described lasting allowances.

The shoe is then presented to the thread lasting machine, as previously described, and the stitching I08 is performed, this stitching passing through the lasting allowances I04a, 22a, 24a, 50a, 26a and 34a to securely fasten the wrapper I04, upper 22, doubler 24, toe box 50, lining 2B, and sock lining 34 together around the toe'between the tip points A and B. I The lasting allowances I04a, 22a, 24a, 50a, 26a and 34a are then trimmed as previously described, and the shoe is ready for the spotting of the platform and previously described subsequent operations necessary to complete the manufac ture of the shoe.

The just-described alternative process makes itpossible to manufacture a closed toe, sliplasted shoe having the properties of a shopmade by conventional lasting methods. The elimination of'the relasting operation reduces the cost of manufacture even more than the firstdescribed process, and the partial attachment of the front cover to the shoe prior to the toeforming operation eliminates any direct contact between the wipers of the toe-forming machine andany exposed surface of the finished shoe, because the front cover is turned outwardly and downwardly in the subsequent completing of the shoe. Accordingly, damage to any finished surface of the shoe, and particularly to the upper, during'the toe-forming operation is reduced to a'minimum.

The process of this invention is applicable to shoes havinga conventionally lasted heel, and when applied to such shoes the sock lining is stitched to the upper elements of the shoe, prior to the insertion of the last, from the tip points A and B rearwardly to the breast line. The toe of the shoe is completed as described herein, and the heel portion may be completed in any desired manner.

In View of the preceding disclosure, it will be appreciated that this invention provides a process for the manufacture of closed toe, slip-lasted shoes which is economical and which results in the production of a slip-lasted shoe having the appearance and wearing qualities, particularly in the toe, of a shoe produced by conventional lasting methods. Those skilled in the art will understand that certain of the steps set forth herein are not necessary to the practice of the invention, while onthe other hand, additional steps maybe included as the conditions under which the invention is practiced vary; furthermore, the essential steps of the invention need not be practiced in the exact sequence herein set forth. and other types of machines than those referred to herein may be employed.

All such variations inthe practice of this invention are intended to be covered by the following claims:

I claim:

1. That improvement in methods of making shoes which includes the steps of providing an upper having a lasting allowance forward of the tip line thereof, providing a sock lining having a lasting allowance corresponding to the lasting allowance of the upper, providing a lining in at least the toe portion of said upper, uniting the upper and sock lining rearward of the tip line,

inserting a last in the shoe, inserting a toe box between the upper'and its lining, and uniting the upper and sock lining forward of the tip line by fastenings extending through said lasting allowances near the edge of the last.

2. That improvement in methods of making shoes which includes the steps of providing an upper having a lasting allowance forward of the tip line thereof, providing a sock lining having a lasting allowance corresponding to the lasting allowance of the upper, providing a lining in at least the toe portion of said upper, uniting the upper and sock lining rearward of the tip line,

inserting a-last in the shoe, inserting a toe box .having a lasting allowance between the upper viding anupperanda sock lining eachhaving a lasting allowance forward at the tip line and a stem ntran e ear ard of the tie line ro iding a mung in at least the toe portion" of said upper, uniting the upper and s'o'cklining by stitching along the sai'd'seam allowances, inserting a last inside the shoe, inserting a toe box between the upper and its lining, fastening together the upper and sock liningnear the edge of the last forward of the tip line thereofltrimming the lasting allowances outside said lastmentioned fastenings, removing the last from the shoe, attaching a cover strip around the toe of the shoe by Stitching through the margins of the cover strip, upper, toe box, upper lining and sock lining, reinserting the last in the shoe, laying a platform sole underneath the sock lining, lasting the cover in over the bottom margin of the platform sole, and attaching an outsole.

4. That improvement in methods of making shoes which includes the steps of providing an upper having a lasting allowance forward of the tip line thereof, providing a sock lining having a lasting allowance corresponding to the lasting allowance of the upper, providing a lining in at least the toe portion of said upper, uniting the upper and seek lining rearward of the tip lines of the same, inserting a last in the shoe, inserting a toe box between the upper and its lining, fastening together the upper and sock lining near the edge of the last forward of the tip line, trimming the lasting allowances outside said stitching, removing the last from the shoe, and attaching a cover strip around the toe of the shoe by fastenings extending through the margins of the cover strip, upper, toe box, upper lining and sock lining.

5. That improvement in methods of making slip-lasted shoes which includes the steps of providing an upper having a lasting allowance for ward of the tip line thereof, providing a sock lining having a lasting allowance corresponding to the lasting allowance of the upper, providing a lining in at least the toe portion of said upper, uniting the upper and sock lining rearward of the tip lines of the same, inserting a last in the shoe, inserting a toe box between the upper and its lining, forming the toe of the shoe, inserting a line of fastenings to unite the upper and sock lining near the edge of the last forward of the tip line, trimming the lasting allowances outside said line of fastenings, removing the last from the shoe, attaching a cover strip around the toe of the shoe by stitching through the margins of the cover strip, upper, toe box, upper lining and sock lining, reinserting the last in the shoe, laying a platform sole underneath the sock lining, lasting the cover in over the bottom margin of the platform sole, and attaching an outsole.

6. That improvement in methods of making shoes which includes the steps of providing an upper and a sock lining each having a lasting allowance forward of the tip line, providing a lining in at least the toe portion of said upper, uniting the upper and sock lining rearward of the tip line, positioning a cover around the toe of the shoe and attaching the cover to the shoe rearward of the tip line, inserting a last in the shoe, inserting a toe box between the upper and its lining, and conforming the toe of the shoe to the last.

7. That improvement in methods of making shoes which includes the steps of providing an upper and a sock lining each having a lasting allowance forward of the tip line, providing a lining in at least the toe portion of said upper,

un n the u per and 99k l nin ear of the tip line, positioning a cover around the toe of he sh an at ath oi e to e s e w d t he ti l n ertin last in th shoe, inserting a toe box betweenthe upper and its lining, conforming the toe ofthe shoe to the last, and uniting the cover, upper and sock lining forward of the tip line'byj'inserting fastenings through said cover and the lasting allowances of the upper and sock lining near'the'edge of the last.

8 That improvement in methods of making shoes which includes the steps of providing an upper and a sock lining each having a lasting allowance forward of the tip line, providing a lining in at least the toe portion of said upper, uniting the upper and sock lining rearward of the tip line, providing a cover having a lasting allowance along one side thereof and positioning the cover around the toe of the shoe with the lasting allowance of the cover ahead of the tip line of the shoe, attaching the cover to the shoe rearward of the tip line thereof, inserting a last in the shoe, inserting a toe box between the upper and its lining, and conforming the toe of the shoe to the last.

9. That improvement in methods of making shoes which includes the steps of providing an upper and a sock lining each having a lasting allowance forward of the tip line, providing a lining in at least the toe portion of said upper, providing a cover having a lasting allowance along one side thereof and positioning the cover around the toe of the shoe with the lasting allowance of the cover forward of the tip line of the shoe, uniting the upper, sock lining and cover rearward of the tip line, inserting a last in the shoe, inserting a toe box between the upper and its lining, conforming the toe of the shoe to the last, joining together the cover, upper, toe box and sock lining by fastenings inserted through the same near the edge of the last, and trimming the lasting allowances of the cover, upper, toe box and sock lining outside said fastenings.

10. That improvement in methods of making shoes which includes the steps of providing an upper having a lasting allowance at one end thereof, providing a sock lining having a lasting allowance corresponding to that of the upper, uniting the upper and sock lining from the last ing allowances toward the other end of the shoe, inserting an end stiffener in the end of the shoe having the said allowances, and uniting the upper and sock lining by inserting fastenings extending through said allowances near the edge of a last placed in the shoe.

11. That improvement in methods of making shoes which includes the steps of providing an upper, lining and sock lining each having lasting allowances at an end of the shoe, positioning a cover about said end of the shoe, securing portions of the cover at the shank to the upper and sock lining at opposite sides of the shoe leaving the central portion of the cover free, inserting an end stiffener in that end of the shoe, drawing the free portion of the cover down about the end of a last in the shoe, and securing the cover, upper, lining and sock lining together about that end of the shoe.

12. That improvement in methods of making shoes which includes the steps of providing an upper and upper lining having lasting allowances at an end thereof, providing a sock lining and a cover having lasting allowances corresponding to those of the upper, uniting the upper, sock linr l l 11 ing and portions of the cover at each side of the shank portion of the shoe leaving the central portion of the cover free and extending about the end of the shoe above the bottom thereof, inserting an end stiffener between the upper and lining, working the cover down into position about the end of the shoe, and securing together the yet-unsecured portion of the cover, upper and sock lining about the end of the shoe in which a last has been placed.

BENJAMIN F. PARRELLI.

12 REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,391,437 Moskowitz et a1 Dec. 25, 1945 2,438,821 Quinn Mar. 30, 1948 2,442,239 Herlihy May 25, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2391437 *Sep 1, 1944Dec 25, 1945Abram MoskowitzShoe
US2438821 *May 17, 1946Mar 30, 1948Universal Shoe CorpPlatform type shoe and method of making same
US2442239 *Jun 20, 1945May 25, 1948Herlihy William FMethod of making shoes
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2734207 *Oct 2, 1952Feb 14, 1956United Shoe Machinery Corporationparrelli
US2770824 *Oct 12, 1953Nov 20, 1956Hamilton Shoe CompanyMethod of making platform shoes
US7861438Jun 12, 2007Jan 4, 2011Converse Inc.Footwear with free floating upper
Classifications
U.S. Classification12/142.00R, 12/142.00F, 36/16
International ClassificationA43B9/14, A43B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B9/14
European ClassificationA43B9/14