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Publication numberUS2566588 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 4, 1951
Filing dateMar 2, 1946
Priority dateMar 2, 1946
Publication numberUS 2566588 A, US 2566588A, US-A-2566588, US2566588 A, US2566588A
InventorsThompson Parke H
Original AssigneeBastian Blessing Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Beverage dispenser with control setting indicator
US 2566588 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 4, 1951 P. H. THOMPSON 5 5 BEVERAGE DISPENSER WITH CONTROL SETTING INDICATOR Filed March 2, 1946 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 F'IGI.

I23 79 93 9 M5 129 I 9 I 66 I 3 149 /0 I11 r mi /5/ 147 EP/L L 65 Ma {09 J W, a? 51 /05 P 1951 P. H. THOMPSON 2,566,588

BEVERAGE DISPENSER WITH CONTROL SETTING INDICATOR Filed March 2, 1946 2 Sheets-Shet 2 e9 7 4m W Patented Sept. 4, 1951 BEVERAGE DISPENSER WITH CONTROL SETTING INDICATOR Parke H. Thompson, Kirkwood, Mo., assignor, by mesne assignments, to The Bastian-Blessing Company, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Application March 2, 1946, Serial No. 651,648

13 Claims. (Cl. 225-21) This invention relates to a beverage dispenser, and more particularly to a dispenser adapted to dispense and mix beverage syrup and carbonated water and to discharge the resulting mixture.

Among the several objects of this invention may be noted the provision of a beverage dispenser comprising a syrup dispenser and a carbonated water faucet adapted to direct a stream of carbonated Water toward a stream of syrup fiOW- ing from the syrup dispenser; the provision, in such a beverage dispenser, of an improved syrup tank having an improved syrup dispensing valve and means for facilitating proper setting of the valve to dispense the proper amount of syrup regardless of the level of syrup in the tank; the provision, in such a beverage dispenser, of an improved carbonated water outlet adapted to discharge carbonated water over syrup flowing from the syrup tank without excessive loss of carbonation; and the provision of a beverage dispenser ofv the class described comprising parts which may be readily disassembled for cleaning and readily reassembled. Other objects will be in part obvious and in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the elements and combinations of elements, features of construction, and arrangements of parts which will be exemplified in the structures hereinafter described, and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which one of various possible embodiments of the invention is illustrated,

Fig. 1 is a vertical longitudinal section through the beverage dispenser of this invention taken on theline of Fig. 2;

Fig. 2 is an end view of the beverage dispenser including a longitudinal section through the carbonated water faucet, being taken on line 22 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a transverse section through the carbonated water faucet taken on line 33 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is an enlargement of a part of the section through the carbonated water faucet of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a section taken on line 5-5 of Fig. 1 illustrating a detail of the syrup dispensing valve of this invention;

Fig. 6 is an elevation showing one manner of mounting the beverage dispensers of this invention under a counter; and,

Fig. 7 is an elevation illustrating an alternative manner of mounting the beverage dispensers of this invention under a counter.

Similar reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

Referring now to the drawings, the beverage dispenser of this invention includes a tank, generally designated by reference character I, containing concentrated beverage syrup. The tank I comprises a transparent drum 3, preferably formed of glass or a plastic, the open ends being closed by heads 5 and l which are preferably composed of metal but which may be of transparent plastic. The ends of the drum seat in annular recesses 9 and II formed adjacent the peripheries of the heads 5 and 1, respectively. Suitable gaskets 13 are disposed between the ends of the drum and the bottoms of recesses 8 and l l. The heads 5 and .1 are clamped against their respective ends of th drum by a centrally disposed through bolt |5 having threaded ends upon which acorn nuts H are screwed up against the heads, suitable washers |9 being disposed between the nuts and the heads. The head 1 of tank I is formed to provide a filler spout 2| open at its upper end, and a cap 23, of metal or plastic material or the like, is provided for closing the open upper end of the filler spout. The cap 23 may bear suitable indicia indicating the beverage which is to be dispensed. The drum 3 and the heads 5 and 1 may be readily disassembled by removing one or both nuts so that the tank may easily be disassembled for cleaning and reassembled after cleaning.

A syrup dispensing valve, generally designated by reference character 21, is disposed in the head I diametrically opposite and below the filler spout 2|. This syrup valve 21 comprises a tubular bearing 29 fixed in an aperture in the head 7 and a valve member 3| slidably mounted in the bearing. Bearing 29 extends a short distance into the tank and its inner end is formed as a valve seat 33. A valve head is formed on the inner end of the valve member 3| and has an annular groove therein receiving an annular gasket 31 adapted to engage the valve seat 33 when valve member 3| is moved to the right, as viewed in Fig. 1. Valve member 3| has therein a central bore 39. Radial apertures 4| afford communication between said bore 39 and an annular recess 43 formed in the periphery of valve member 3| adjacent head 35. It will be apparent that when the valve member -,3| is moved to the left, as viewed in Fig. 1, to unseat the gasket 31, syrup will flow through the gap between the gasket and the valve seat into the annular recess 43, through apertures 4| into the bore 39 in valve 3|, and out of the right-hand end (see arrow, Fig. 1).

The outer end of valve member 3| is formed with a reduced extension 45 and mounted on said extension is a rotary cap 47 having a cylindrical wall 49 telescoped over bearing 29 and adapted to rotate and slide thereon. A nut 5i, threaded on the end of extension 45, retains the cap E? on valve member 31. As particularly illustrated in Fig. 5, the bearing 29 is formed with a peripheral groove having one leg 53 in a plane at right angles to the axis of the valve, and a leg 55 ending at an angle thereto toward the tank I. A pin 51 secured to cap 41 extends into said groove. The cap 4! is formed at one end of an operating lever 59 having a knob S l at its other end. A compression spring disc 53 is disposed between the inner end of the cylindrical wall 49 of the cap 41 and the head I of the tank. This spring disc 63 biases cap 41 and valve member 3! to the right to the position wherein pin 5-! is disposed as shown in Fig. 5 and wherein gasket 31 seats against valve seat 33 to cut off flow of syrup from the tank. The arrangement is such that, when the operating lever 59 is depressed from its Fig. 2 position, the cap 4'? is rotated in such manner that pin '61 travels in angular leg 55 of the peripheral groove in the bearing 29, and the cap 41 and valve member 3! move to the left to unseat gasket 31 of the valve head This opens the valve to permit flow of syrup into annular recess '43 and through radial apertures 4i into the bore 39 and out through the outer end of said bore. When the operating lever 59 is released, spring 63 biases cap 41 and valve member 3! to the right to seat gasket 37 of the valve head 35 against valve seat '33 to cut off flow. Cap slides to the right and "rotates on hearing 29 during such return movement to return pin 5i to the position shown in Fig. '5. The arrangement is also such that, when the operating lever 59 is moved upward from its position shown in Fig. 2, pin 51 travels in leg 53 of the peripheral groove in bearing 29. Since leg '53 of the groove is in a plane at right angles to the axis of the valve, cap 41 does not slide axiallyon bearing 29 but merely rotates thereon, consequently such movement of operating lever 59 does not open the valve. The cap 41 is formed with a flat 'chordal face 65, to function as a cam for purposes to be mentioned subsequently.

In the operation of the dispenser, the operating lever 59 is depressed to 'open valve 27 to permit syrup to flow out of the tank and also to open a carbonated water faucet, generally designated by reference character 69. This permits flow of carbonated water into the stream of syrup. The syrup and carbonated water mix, and the mixture is caught in a drinking-glass or the like (not shown). The operating -1everis depressed for the time interval required to flll the drinking glass. It is desirable to dispense uniformly-flavored drinks, and to do so it is necessary that each serving of a particular quantity have the same proportion of-sy-rup therein. The rate of flow of syrup from tank I, however, is dependent upon the head of syrup in the tank-and also upon the extent to which operating lever 59 is depressed. This is because valve 2"! functions as a throttle valve and its setting is determined by the position of operating lever 59. -Since the time interval required to dispense servings of an equal quantity of carbonated water is the same, it is necessary to depress lever 59 to various positions dependent upon the head of syrup in the tank to insure that the same amount of syru will flow out of the tank in that interval. If the tank is 4 full, the lever 59 must be depressed only to a certain predetermined limited extent to set the valve 21 to deliver syrup at the proper rate to dispense the required amount of syrup. If, on the other hand, the tank is nearly empty, the lever 59 must be depressed to the ultimate limit in order to open valve 21 sufficiently to deliver the same amount of syrup. Intermediate heads of syrup in the tank require predetermined intermediate settings of operating lever 59 to effect dispensing of syrup at the same rate.

To indicate to the operator the proper setting for lever 59 for a particular head of syrup in the tank I, the head i of the tank I is provided with a scale comprising indicia 66 labeled in terms of syrup level. The positions of indicia 66 are so correlated with the positions of the lever 59 that when an edge of the lever coincides with a particular index and the syrup level in tank I is that connoted by that particular index the valve 2'! is properly set for syrup to flow out of .the tank at the proper rate.

The carbonated water faucet 89, illustrated in Figs. 2-4, includes a fitting "H which is connected to the end of a carbonated water supply pipe (not shown) in fixed position adjacent the tank i. Adjustably threaded on the forward end of fitting ii is a cap 75 having a portion 71 provided with a central aperture 19 for passage of carbonated water. The forward end of fitting TI is counterbored to form a pocket 8i and a beveled annular shoulder 33 therein. The portion '11 of the cap 15 is interiorly counterbored to provide a pocket 85, of the same diameter as pocket 8|, and a beveled annular shoulder 83 therein. A tubular element 89, formed of resilient material, preferably such as synthetic rubber, is disposed within pocket Si and projects forward from the end or" fitting Fl. The external diameter of the tube 59 is the same as the diameter of pockets SI and 85 and the ends of the tube are countersunk to seat against the beveled shoulders 83 and 81. The internal wall of the tube 89 is normally cylindrical when the tube is not subjected to axial compression, as illustrated in solid lines in Fig. 4, but by screwing cap 15 up on the end of the fitting the tube 89 may be axially compressed so as to deform the inner wall of the tube to the venturi shape illustrated in solid lines in Fig. 2 and in dotted lines in Fig. 4. When the tube is so compressed it forms a venturi, indicated by reference character 9 I.

As illustrated in Fig. 4, there is a space between the forward end of fitting H and the inner face of the portion 7-! of cap 75 when the tube 89 is uncompressed. This permits cap 15 to be screwed up on the'end of fitting H to the position illustrated by the dotted lines in Fig. 4 so as to compress the tube 89, and permits adjustment of the shape of venturi 9|. A vent 93 (Fig. 2) is provided in cap (5 to-relieve the pressure in the space within the cap resulting from the screwing up of the cap on the fiting and to prevent this pressure from squeezing tube 89 radially inward and closing oil or obstructing the passage therethrough.

The carbonated water faucet also includes a nozzle, generally designated 95, comprising a cylindrical nozzle bodysl having-a bore 99 extending inwardly from its rear end of substantially the same diameter as cap 75. The rear end of the nozzle body is telescoped over the cap 15 and may slide thereon, but the clearance is such as substantially to prevent any leakage of carbonated Water therebetween. The nozzle body is accuse guided for sliding movement on the cap by being disposed in a bearing IOI formed on a bracket I93 secured to the head 1 of the tank. The axis of the fitting ll, cap I5, nozzle 95 and its bearing I ElI extends at an angle to the vertical and intersects the vertical plane through the outlet of the syrup dispensing valve 2! a short distance below said outlet. Hence the stream of carbonated water flowing from the nozzle merges with the stream of syrup flowing through the outlet shortly after issuing therefrom. The nozzle body 91 is formed with a flange I on its forward end having a flat forward surface III! in engagement with the flat face 65 of cap 41. When operating lever 59 is moved in either direction from its neutral position of Fig. 2, the cap cams the nozzle body upward in its bearing until the cylindrical wall of the cap ll rides onto the flat surface I91, whereupon the nozzle body is maintained at its upward limit of movement in its bearing.

Nozzle body 91, in addition to the previously mentioned bore 99 therein, is formed with an outlet bore I99 of smaller diameter than bore 99 extending rearwardly in from its forward end and an internal conical surface III joining the interior ends of these bores. A streamlining needle member H3 has a cylindrical portion H5 disposed within the larger bore 99 and a conical portion Ill tapering forward therefrom within the internal conical surface III. This portion Ill also extends into the outlet bore I09. The member H3 is fixed within nozzle body 9'1 and spaced from the internal wall thereof by means of radial pins I 59 extending from the nozzle body into the main body of the needle member. These pass through radial spacing lugs or spot pads 82! formed on the needle member. A valve stem I23 is threaded into an axial bore in the rear face of needle member H3, and is readily removable therefrom. This valve stem extends rearward from the nozzle through the aperture I9 in cap l5 and through the rubber tube 89 into fitting H, where its end is formed as a valve head I25 having a groove I 2?. When the fitting is uncoupled from the carbonated water supply pipe, a screw driver may be readily inserted and engaged with the groove to unscrew and remove valve stem I23. The internal diameter of the rubber tube is substantially less than the internal diameter of fitting II so that the upper end of the tube forms a valve seat I29 cooperating with the valve head I25. When the nozzle is in the Fig. 2 position, the valve head engages the valve seat to cut off flow through the faucet. When the nozzle is cammed to move upward upon rotation of the operating lever 59, the valve stem and valve head move upward to unseat the head and permit flow.

The forward face of the end portion ll of fitting II is formed with a pair of smooth annular grooves I33 and I35 to provide smooth annular undulating ridges I3! thereon. The rear face of needle member H3 is formed with a pair of smooth annular grooves I39 and MI to provide smooth annular undulating ridges I43 thereon. When the nozzle body 91 is moved to its upper limit, the ridges I3I are disposed within but spaced from the walls of grooves I39 and MI and the ridges I43 are disposed within but spaced from the walls of the grooves I 33 and I35 so as to provide between aperture IS in cap I5 and the nozzle passages, a tortuous but smooth radial labyrinth passage for the carbonated water. This reduces its velocity without excessiv scrubbing action which might otherwise prematurely release I 6 CO2 gas. To prevent rotation of the nozzle body 91 on cap I5, a removable screw I41 extends from the nozzle body into a longitudinal slot I49 formed in the cap. This screw also projects through a longitudinal slot I5! in the bearing II, as shown in Fig. 2. This allows longitudinal movement between 91 and I0 I. When the valve stem has been removed, the fitting II and cap I5 may be readily disassembled from the nozzle by removing screw A plurality of tanks may be mounted with their axes parallel to each other under a dispensin counter I55. This may be done by suspending such tanks in U-shaped brackets I5I secured at their upper ends to the underside of the counter I55 in any suitable manner, with the filler spouts 2| projecting beyond the edge of the counter, as illustrated in Fig. 6. An alternative tandem mounting of the tanks with a pair of operating levers 59 disposed next to each other and operating in planes perpendicular to the counter is illustrated in Fig. 7. In this arrangement the tanks are supported under a dispensing counter I59 substantially coaxially. This is done by means of brackets IBI having apertured ends received on the ends of the through bolts I5, the acorn nuts II being screwed down against the lower ends of said brackets. The upper ends of the brackets are secured to the underside of the counter I59 in any suitable manner. To facilitate filling of the tanks the counter I59 has a gap I63 therein which exposes the filling spout 2| of each of the tanks. It will be noted that in this coaxial manner of mounting the tanks the operating levers of two tanks are disposed adjacent each other for'convenience of operation.

The operation of the beverage dispenser is as follows:

If it is desired to dispense a mixed drink, the operator notes the level of syrup in tank I. Since the drum 3 is transparent, the syrup level may be readily determined merely by inspection. He then depresses operating lever 59 to the proper index 66, dependent upon the level of syrup in tank I. This opens the syrup dispensing valve 21 the proper amount according to the level of syrup in the tank and syrup flows out of the right-hand end of bore 39 in valve member 3| as shown in Figure 1. Depression of operatin lever 59 also causes the nozzle 95 to move upward, as viewed in Fig. 2, to unseat valve head I25 from its seat I29 on the rubber tube 89. Such movement is caused by the camming action of flat face 65 on the cap 47 against the end of the nozzle. When valve head I25 ls unseated, carbonated water flows through the venturi 9| formed by the rubber tube 89, through the aperture 19' in the end of cap I5 and then through the tortuous radial passage formed by the cooperating annular grooves and ridges of the end faces of cap I5 and needle member H3. After passing through the tortuous passage, the carbonated water flows in the space between needle member H3 and the internal wall of nozzle body 91 and out throughthe outlet bore I 99 in the forward end thereof. The wall of the conical portion II! of needle member II 3 cooperates with the internal, wall of nozzle body 9'! to form the nozzle. The carbonated water issuing from the carbonated water faucet 69 is directed thereby into the stream of syrup flowing from the syrup dispensing valve 21 and flows together therewith into a drinking glass or the like which is held, by the operator in proper position to receive same.

When the glass. has been fllled, the operator amazes releases the operating lever .58. .Spring 63 thereupon moves cap 141 outward on the bearing 29 and the cap and operating lever are .cammed to rotate back to the neutral position indicated in Figs. '2 and 5. This occurs by reason of the pin 5] riding in the angular leg '55 of the groove in the bearing. Such outward movement of cap .4] pulls valve member 31 outward to cause seating of gasket .3] against valve seat 33 and .cut oil the flow of syrup. When the operating lever 59 reaches neutral position, the nozzle 95 is .no longer subject to the ramming action of the cap 41, and the pressure of the carbonated watersupply vforces valve head .Ifiagainst seat I29 to :cut oil .fiow of carbonated water, the nozzle themupon sliding downward in hearing 1:0] to bring its end I01 into engagementwith the fiat'face 65.

:If ;it is desired to dispense carbonated water only, the operator raises lever ;59 from its neutral position indicated :in :Figs. 2 and 5. .Cap ,4] rotates clockwise upon bearing 29, as viewed in Fig. 2, but does not slide thereon since upon such rotation pin 57 travclslin the 183,553 or" the groove a plane at right angles tothe axis of the valve. The syrup valve 2;? therefore does not open and syrup does not flow from the tank, but the nozzle 95 is cammed upward in hearing it! to unseat valve head I25 as previouslt described, permitting carbonated water to flow from the nozzle.

When the desired uantity of carbonated water has been dispensed, the operator moves opera-ting lever 59 back to neutral position.

An important and advantageous feature of the carbonated water dispensing head is the venturi provided by deforming the tubular rubber member 89. It is highly desirable to avoid turbulent flow of the carbonated water since turbulence increases the release of the carbon dioxide gas therefrom. The venturi 9! reduces the turbulcnce of the carbonated water by ,creating'strearn lined flow thereof. Such flow through the ven turi increases the velocity of the carbonated water while causing its pressure to drop. Since it is not desirable to have the carbonated water issue from the carbonated awater dispensing head at high velocity the velocity is reduced in the radial tortuous labyrinth passage formed by the annular grooves and ridges .on cap and needle member -i l3.

One of the advantages 101" the present invention is its adaptability to be easily and readily assembled and disassembled. Sanitation is a necessity in a beverage dispenser and it is highly desirable that a beverage dispenser be of such construction that it may readily be disassembled so that its parts may bra-cleaned. Itwill be noted that the componentpartsr.of:applicants beverage dispenser are so-formedand assembled that .disassembly for cleaning .is quite simple and does not require any particular skill on :the part of the person whose task it is to clean the device. The syrup tank may be easily disassembled .-sim= ply by removing one :orboth of theacorn nuts H and withdrawing the through :bolt i5. When head 7 has been removed, it isa comparatively simple matter to unscrew nut 52! .fromithc end 'of the valve member 3| :and disassemble the syrup valve 21 so that its component parts may be cleaned. The carbonated 'water faucet 9 may be readily disassembled simply by removing fit= ting "H and then unscrewing the .valve stem .123 out of needle member ll t3 and removing screw I41. 7

Another advantage :of the construction is :that it provides iorthezinterchangeahle useof drums .of different lengths to form tanks of varying capacities. If it is desired to replace an installed tank with one of larger capacity, that tank may be disassembled and its drum 3 replaced by a longer drum and the same heads 5 and '1 may be clamped against the ends of the longer drum by employing a longer through bolt [5 of the proper length.

The drum 3 is preferably made of transparent material such as glass, but it may be made of opaque material and the tank I provided with suitable means for indicating the syrup level therein.

In view of the above, it will be seen that the several objects of the invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained.

.As many changes could be made in the above constructions without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

l. A counter dispenser for syrups and the like, comprising a transparent cylinder visibly containing liquid and having a substantially horizontal axis, removable sealed heads on the opposite ends of said cylinder, one of said heads having an upwardly directed inlet and a downwardly located outlet, a removable tension bolt clamping said heads to opposite ends of the cylinder and passing therethrough, liquid flow proportioning control means mounted on said lastnamed head and controlling said outlet, said how proportioning control means having a handle and being adapted to dispense different quantities of liquid depending upon the portion ol' the handle, and indicia on said headwith which said control means is visibly" coordinated to indicate the amount the control means is to be opened in terms of the amount of visible liquid in the cylinder, said indicia being correlated to the height of liquid head inzthe cylinder so that, as the liquid head diminishes due to withdrawal of liquid, the

resultant slower flow of liquid through the flow controlling means may be compensated by appropriate positioning of the handle to cause a relatively uniform uantity of liquid to be .dispensed.

2. VA valve comprising a hollow cylindric core of resilient material, axially adjustable means engaging said :core at opposite ends for axially compressing saidcore to produce by deformation an internal Venturi throat, said core extendin radially inward on atleast one end from one of said adjustable means to provide a valve seat, and'a valve engaging said seat.

3. A valve comprising a hollow cylindric core of resilient material, axially adjustable means engaging said core at opposite ends for axially oompressingsaid .core to produce by deformation an internal V'enturi throat, said score extending radially inward on .at least one end from one of said adjustable means to provide va valve 86313.8 valveheadengageable with said seat, and a valve stem carryingsaid head and extending through the venturi shape. of :said core.

4. A valve comprising a hollow cylindric core of resilient material, means threaded between one anotherand engaging said core at opposite ends;f0raxially-compressing said core to produce by deformation an internal Venturi throat, said core extending radially inward on at least one end from one of said adjustable means to provide a valve seat, a valve head engagea'ble with said seat, and a valve stem carrying said head and extending through said core and from one of said adjustable members.

5. A dispenser comprising a tank adapted to contain a first liquid, said tank having an outlet therein, a throttle valve for controlling fiow of said first liquid through said outlet, a faucet adjacent said outlet adapted to direct a stream of a second liquid into contact with a stream of said first liquid flowing out of said outlet, a valve in said faucet for controlling fiow of said second liquid therethrough, an operating lever movably mounted on said tank for simultaneously operating both of said valves, the position of said lever determining the setting of said throttle valve, and means cooperating with said lever to indicate the proper setting of said throttle valve to obtain substantially the same rate of flo-W of said first liquid through said outlet for varying levels of liquid in said tank.

6. A dispenser comprising a. tank adapted to contain a first liquid, said tank having an outlet therein, a throttle valve for controlling fiow of said first liquid through said outlet, a faucet adjacent said outlet adapted to direct a stream of a second liquid into contact with a stream of said first liquid flowing out of said outlet, a valve in said faucet for controlling fiow of said second liquid therethrough, an operating lever rotatably mounted on said tank for simultaneously operating both of said valves, the position of said lever determining the setting of said throttle valve, and a scale on said tank comprising indicia labeled in terms of the level of said first liquid in the tank and so correlated with the operating lever that, when said lever is positioned to coincide with the particular index connoting the instant level of liquid in the tank, the throttle valve is so set as to permit substantially the same rate of flow of liquid through said outlet as when the level is different and the lever is positioned to coincide with the index indicating that level.

'7. A dispenser comprising a tank adapted to contain aliquid, said tank having an outlet therein, a throttle valve for controlling flow of liquid through said outlet, an operating lever movably mounted on said tank for operating said valve, the position of said lever determining the setting of said valve, and means cooperating with said lever to indicate the proper setting of said valve to obtain substantially the same rate of flow of liquid through said outlet for varying levels of liquid in said tank.

8. A dispenser comprising a tank adapted to contain a liquid, said tank having an outlet therein, a throttle valve for controlling fiow of liquid through said outlet, an operating lever rotatably mounted on said tank for operating said valve, the position of said lever determining the setting of said valve, and a scale on said tank comprising indicia labeled in terms of the level of liquid in the tank and so correlated with the operating lever that, when said lever is positioned to coincide with the particular index connoting the instant level of liquid in the tank, the throttle valve is so set as to permit substantially the same rate of flow of liquid through said outlet as when the level is diiferent and the lever is positioned to coincide with the index indicating that level.

9. A dispenser comprising a tank adapted to contain a liquid, said tank having an aperture therein, a bearing fixed in said aperture extending into said tank and projecting outward therefrom, a valve member slidably mounted in said bearing, said valve member having a valve head on the 10 inner end thereof, a bore extending inwardfrom its outer end to provide a passage for flow of liquid, and at least one radial passage therethrough adapted to establish communication between the interior of the tank and the bore in said valve member when said valve member is moved inward to open position, said valve head being adapted to seat against the inner end of said bearing to cut off fiow through said valve memher when moved to its outer limit, said bearing being formed with a peripheral groove therein extending at an angle inward toward the tank, a cap rotatably mounted on the outer end of said valve member but axially fixed thereon, apin fixed in said cap extending into said groove, an operating lever for rotating said cap, said pin traveling in said groove upon rotation of said operating lever in one direction to move said valve member inward to permit fiow therethrough,

the-setting of said valve member being dependent upon the extent of rotation of said operating lever, and means cooperating with said operating lever to indicate the proper setting of said valve member to obtain substantially the same rate of flow of liquid therethrough for varying levels of liquid in said tank.

10. A faucet comprising a fitting adapted to be connected at one end to a source of liquid, a nozzle at the other end of said fitting, a valve in said fitting, and a venturi intermediate said valve and nozzle, said faucet being provided with a tortuous labyrinth fluid passage intermediate said venturi and said nozzle.

11. A faucet comprising a fitting, a nozzle at one end of said fitting, said nozzle comprising a nozzle body telescoped over the end of said fitting, said fitting and nozzle body being relatively axially movable and in substantially fluid-tight relation, a needle member fixed in said nozzle body, a valve stem secured to said needle member and extending therefrom into said fitting, a valve head on said valve stem, and a valve seat within said fitting, said valve head engaging said valve seat when said nozzle body and fitting are relatively moved way from each other to cut off fiow through said fitting, said valve head disengaging said valve seat when said nozzle body and fitting are relatively moved toward each other to permit flow through said fitting and nozzle.

12. A faucet comprising a fitting, a cap on one end of said fitting, the outer face of the end of said cap being formed to provide a plurality of annular grooves and ridges, the end of said cap having a central aperture therein, a nozzle body telescoped over said cap so as to be slidable thereon but in substantially fluid-tight relation thereto, a needle member fixed in said nozzle body having a cylindrical portion and a conical portion converging forward therefrom toward the outlet end of said nozzle body, said cylindrical portion having a rear face formed to provide a plurality of annular grooves and ridges cooperating with the annular grooves and ridges of said cap to form a radial labyrinth passage, a

is valve stem secured to said needle member and extending therefrom into said fitting, a valve head on said valve stem, and a valve seat within said fitting, said valve head engaging said valve seat when said nozzle body and fitting are relatively moved away from each other to cut off flow through said fitting, said valve head disengaging said valve seat when said nozzle body and fitting are relatively moved toward each other to permit fiow through said fitting and nozzle.

13. A carbonated water faucet comprising a 11 mung; one end of said fitting being connected to a source of carbonated water under pressure, the other end of said fitting being externally threaded and having a counterbore therein forming a pocket having an annular shoulder at the inner end thereof, a tube of resilient material fitted in said pocket and projecting beyond the end of said fitting, the internal diameter of said tube being less than the internal diameter of said fitting whereby the inner end of said tube forms a valve seat withinsaid fitting, a cap threaded on the end of said fitting, the inner face of the end of said cap engaging the outer end of said tube and adapted to compress the tube when screwed down upon the end of said fitting, the outer i'ace of said end of the cap being formed to provide a plurality of annular grooves and ridges; the end of said cap being centrally apertured, a. nozzle body telescoped on the cap and adapted to slide'ther'eon but in substantially fluidtight relation thereto, a needle member fixed within said nozzle body having a cylindrical ortlon and' a conical portion converging forward therefrom toward the outlet end of said nozzle body, said cylindrical portion having a rear face being formed to provide a plurality of annular grooves and ridges cooperating with the annular REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 693,315 Soderlund Feb. 11, 1902 20 1,525,650 Koenig Feb. 10, 1925 1,657,663 Devereux June 21, 1928 1,999,271 Austin Apr. 30, 1935 2,081,022 Smith May 18, 1937 FOREIGN PATENTS 25 Number Country Date 782,182 France May 3, 1935

Patent Citations
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US1525650 *May 14, 1923Feb 10, 1925Koenig CarbonatorsDraft arm for dispensing beverages
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3508682 *Aug 14, 1967Apr 28, 1970Cambridge Res & Dev GroupDispensing of detergent blends of predetermined strength
US3685786 *Aug 31, 1970Aug 22, 1972Woodson Riley DElastic valve element having variable orifice
US3891180 *Oct 23, 1973Jun 24, 1975White Westinghouse CorpLow pressure liquid dispensing valve
US4760940 *Jun 22, 1987Aug 2, 1988Brewster Plastics, Inc.Carbonated beverage dispenser having low turbulence valve
WO1979001060A1 *May 11, 1979Dec 13, 1979Us CommerceLow profile crushing apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/48, 138/45, 251/121, 222/129.1, 137/636.4, 251/122, 137/625, 251/4, 251/340, 222/51, 222/158, 137/898, 222/134, 137/316, 222/181.2, 222/50, 137/559, 222/129.3
International ClassificationB67D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB67D1/0082
European ClassificationB67D1/00H8B