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Publication numberUS2567326 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 11, 1951
Filing dateOct 15, 1947
Priority dateOct 15, 1947
Publication numberUS 2567326 A, US 2567326A, US-A-2567326, US2567326 A, US2567326A
InventorsEntsminger Dallas E
Original AssigneeEntsminger Dallas E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combination can handle, brush scraper, and brush rest
US 2567326 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 11, 1951 D. E. ENTSMINGER COMBINATION CAN HANDLE, BRUSH SCRAPER, AND BRUSH REST Filed Oct. 15, 1947 Fig.

Inventor Dal/as E. Enfsminger .1' and i aiented Sept. 11, 1951 fiallas lili Eritsnlingrer,ffiilton Villagefvad masher-aerial:15, it seiiaifliqol tsfid i handle, brush scraper, =and bru'shrestandhisfir its primary object to enable a paintefpto e asil y transport an open {paint-can withoutdanger 0f =spi lin -thei e n he fe. v .1,

. smo e -Ob ec so 'f z itai h ss-pa n from ay a tsbmshi; *anceihat'the s rapin l'zr tnm... O D n 'W t in thee-an; nd Wil 1 7 down and around the exterior of tliegia eesew ;th usualiin rn d aneei, l fiend of a j conventional paintwcan is used asya bruslnscraper 1 Aiurt enpbi ct i ot: ythdbl'llsh scra er ar-1d the;g p; N -handle=as-a :rest=for a qua-int b r us h-, and ma -thebrush= bristlesin awposition :in which any exeess*paint thereon will dripinto-the can. M

- The above and aother obj ectsrIpay beat-tain ed by employing this g invention which engbodies ramongi-tszfeaturesa handsgrip;' ownwardlygxtrandingarm"adjacent Oilfi filfltl he hand grip,

a head extending outwardly fre1n the-end-of the arm 'remotefrom thegrip; afjcan flange engaging ear at each end of the head and a scraper blade extending upwarmy fr'6intli' edge of the head remote from thearm. C 7

D Other features include formin'gflthe liand Erip in concavo-convex cross section'with theconcave side disposed'upwardlyto"forin-"a'--cradle for the handle of a brush when-' 'the ilatter is at rest'fon the' devicepan outturnedscraping'ilip at; idg'e 'fo'i the scraperblade .to rdirect the alck 'into'ethelcanand aiean'iside engag'lriiiarm iprdje-tingiibwnwardly .from theiconvexlsidevof itliei liand lgrip .formcoopei'ation ewith tli'fdowhwardly extending arm in embracing the upper edge of a conventional paint can.

In the drawings,

Figure 1 is a fragmentary sectional view of a paint can showing this improved handle, paint scraper and brush rest in place thereon,

Figure 2 is a top plan view of the structure illustrated in Figure 1, and

Figure 3 is a sectional view taken substantially in a plane at right angles to the plane of the section of Figure 1.

Referring to the drawings in detail, a conventional paint can designated generally I 0 comprises a cylindrical body ll formed at its upper end with an inturned flange l2, the inner periphery of which terminates in an annular trough 13 forming an annular channel M in which the conventional peripheral flange of a can top (not shown) is received for sealing the contents within the can.

Tunis invention ran e-11 ;ageaatgaepaa"sen I l 1;} l, r1 Plan rin I9 1. e sligh 1 th e"pl'ane oftlielorition 16. in

my magnetism r -tusiina va isp fi iem joined by a transverse K :2 w t .a 1 s .a ede E si.

wardly from the convex side of the grip ali s bs an l y;'p se i ie to 11. 0 1' 8 o m: a a m r isor ia t esn jp 5 arm 22 r m te-i on, 1h in-i5 3 6123; qfisetza illustrated in af ward the direction-in Formed at the end w w il'i m it i iunctiomwithrthe ip? 5, isa 'denendin .fairm 24 w ich; as:iIIHS m mCEiQ *??3x1195rpm?- -allel .with-i the armrzz, ar-1d-coopierates with the extension r18 and arm zi {in embracing theupper 'fi dgeirofa-the waill 'l l iafvt-hei can-'10. I;n;-:this-{pos-ietion, ethe extension 1 1 870%6111851- a portion; of, ithe rchannelv-l 4, :'-;and .the 10W6F363d nf the? arm zfl "term-inates :im a;rplanei substantially,gzoineident -with thebottom .ofi theichannel 11-3. ,rl ormed' on the arm 24 adjacent its lower end and extending therefrom in a direction opposite the grip I6 is a head 25 provided at opposite ends with longitudinally extending ears 26 which, as illustrated in Figures 1 and 2, are adapted to engage the bottom of the trough or channel I3 at two spaced points equidistant at opposite sides of the longitudinal axis of the device. These ears 26 cooperate with the foot 23 in forming a hook by which the grip [6 may be detachably engaged with the paint can 16 so that the latter may be lifted by the handle 15. Formed at the edge of the head 25 remote from its junction with the arm 24 is an upwardly extending flange or blade 21, the, upper edge of which is provided with an outturned lip 28 forming a scraper against which the bristles of a paint brush may be wiped to remove excess paint therefrom. The upper side of this lip also serves as a rest for the bristles of the brush while the handle of the latter may the handle l5 are discharged into the can In.

In use, the device is attached to the can as illustrated in the drawings, with the ears 26 engaging the bottom edge of the channel or trough l3 and the foot 23 engaging the outer side of the can In. The weight of the handle l5 will retain the device in positionon the can and obviously when liiting efiort is exerted on the hand grip IS, the device will fulcrum about the upper edge of the can so that thefoot 23 will bear with considerable pressure against the side or the can while the littingmoment on theihead 25 will be transmitted to the under side of the trough l3, thus forming a convenient handle by which the can may be readily transported. With the painting in'progress,;the user, in dipping the brush in the paint, merely-extracts the brush in such a manner as'to cause the bristles thereof to wipe against the outturned lip 28, so'that excess paint clinging to the brush will be drained back into the can. During periods of interruption'in the painting operation; the user may rest the brush as suggested in the broken lines in Figure 3 across the upper edge of the lip 28 and in the 'trough ll.

While in the foregoing therehas been shown and described the preferred embodiment of this invention, it is to be understood that minor changes in the details of construction, combinatlonand arrangementoi-parts may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of'the' inventionas claimed: r

' Having described the inve tion,- what is claimed as newis: I

14A brush holder comprising brush handle rest, a downwardly extending armsecuredto'one end" oi -the handle rest, a head extending outwardly from the end'of the arm remote from the handle rest,'a can flange engaging ear at each --end of the head and'a brush" bristle supporting blade extending upwardly from the edge of the head remote from'thearm. 7 r 2, A.brush holder. comprising a substantially transversely concavo-convex brush handle rest, an arm carried by and extendingoutwardly adiacent one end'of the handle restin the direction o! the convex side thereof, a head extending outwardly from the'end of the arm remote from and in a direction opposite the handle rest, a can flange engaging ear at each end of the head and a brush bristle supporting blade extending upwardly mm the edge of the head remote from the arm and cooperating with the concave side of the hand grip in forming a rest for a brush.

3. A brush holder comprising brush handle rest, a downwardly extending arm secured to one end of the handle rest, a head extending out wardly from the end of the arm remote from the grip a. can flange engaging ear at each end of rest in spaced parallel relation to the first-mentioned arm.-

4. A brush holder comprising a substantially transversely concavo-convex brush handle rest,

an arm carried by and extending downwardly adjacent one end of the handle rest in the direction of the convex side thereof, a head extending outwardly from the end of the arm remote from and in a direction opposite the hand grip, a can flange engaging car at each end of the head, a brush bristle supporting and scraper blade extending upwardly from the edge of the head remote from the arm and cooperating with the concave side of the brush handle rest in forming a holder for a brush, and a can side engaging arm projecting downwardly from the convex side of the hand grip in spaced parallel relation to the first-mentioned arm.

5. A brush holder comprising a handle rest,'-a downwardly extending arm secured to one end of said handle rest, a transverse forwardly extending head on the lower end of said am, can flange engaging ears on the ends or said head, on upwardly extending brush bristle scraper blade on said arm and cooperating with said brush handle rest in forming a holder for said support, said head having an aperture therein, a downwardly extending leg attached to said rest and spaced rearwardly thereonirom said arm, and a can side engaging finger on said leg extending towards'said arm. 7

- DALLAS E. ENTSMINGER...

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Campbell May 25 1943-

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US419585 *Oct 28, 1889Jan 14, 1890 Paint-pail
US902236 *Jun 18, 1908Oct 27, 1908Robert R KintzDetachable handle for glasses.
US1017753 *Feb 20, 1912 Scraping device for cans and the like.
US2034940 *Jun 15, 1935Mar 24, 1936Henry E ButlerDomestic cooking receptacle
US2320262 *Jul 31, 1941May 25, 1943Campbell Talmage DPaint can handle and brush wiping attachment
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2676730 *Oct 7, 1950Apr 27, 1954Mead HedglonBrush holder attachment for paint pails and the like
US2745570 *Nov 6, 1952May 15, 1956Miller Ralph LPaint brush support and wiper
US2786707 *Sep 30, 1954Mar 26, 1957Campbell Clarence MDetachable handles for containers
US2803374 *Apr 15, 1955Aug 20, 1957Chappman Cash CharlesPaintbrush holder and scraper
US2943761 *Apr 30, 1958Jul 5, 1960Monier Theodore LPaint brush scraper
US3275187 *Sep 25, 1964Sep 27, 1966Lamoureaux Raymond LPainter's utility implement
US3948413 *Jul 5, 1974Apr 6, 1976Gorrell John EPaint brush holding attachment for paint cans
US4014453 *May 20, 1976Mar 29, 1977Edward Joseph TarnackiPaint brush holder
US4583666 *Apr 9, 1984Apr 22, 1986Buck Donald CContainer attachment
US4993671 *Sep 18, 1989Feb 19, 1991Marie Ray M SocPaint brush holder
US5322183 *Mar 1, 1993Jun 21, 1994Strachan David GPaint receptacle
US5375736 *Jun 1, 1993Dec 27, 1994Gonzalez; Donald G.Paintbrush holder
US6871825Mar 5, 2003Mar 29, 2005Chin Ho SongPaint brush holder
US20140203031 *Jan 20, 2014Jul 24, 2014Trurim, Inc.Device for Paint Container
WO2010137976A2 *May 26, 2010Dec 2, 2010Van Geer Rene JohanPaint stirrer with paint brush holder
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/696, 220/697, 220/700
International ClassificationB44D3/12
Cooperative ClassificationB44D3/123
European ClassificationB44D3/12F