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Publication numberUS2567507 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 11, 1951
Filing dateNov 16, 1949
Priority dateNov 16, 1949
Publication numberUS 2567507 A, US 2567507A, US-A-2567507, US2567507 A, US2567507A
InventorsEastman Brown Guy
Original AssigneeJohn Eastman H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for orienting well tools in well bores
US 2567507 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

U O R H C Dn A E S Sept. 11, 1951 G. E. BROWN MEANS FOR ORIENTING WELL TOOLS IN WELL BORES 3 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Nov. 16, 1949 INVENToR.

n W O f. B :L 0 4 We@ Po sgpf. 11, 1951 G. E. BROWN mm1-1 11m MEANS FOR ORIENTING WELL TOOLS IN WELL BORES Filed Nov. 16, 1949 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 @Uy Bron/vh INVENTR.

SMH'UH Km Sept. 11, 1951 G. E. BROWN 2,567,507

MEANS ORIENTING WELL TOOLS IN WELL BORES I Filed Nov. 1e, 1949 s sheets-sheet s @fly /f/V/,Q/l/g/l'Q/x/A///////////////y INVENTOR. I vnu/L MWL) Patented Sept. 11, 1951 Sti-MH Huur MEAN S FOR ORIENTING WELL TOOLS IN WELL BORES Guy Eastman Brown, Houston, Tex., assignor of one-half to H. John Eastman, Denver, Colo.

Application November 16, 1949, Serial No. 127,729

(Cl. Z55- 1.6)

13 Claims.

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in means for orienting well tools in a well bore.

As is well known, the drilling of directional wells has come into general practice and such directional drilling involves the orientation of deecting tools, such as a whipstock, within the well bore, whereby the well may be drilled at an angle in the desired compass direction. Various methods and apparatus for accomplishing the orientation of tools have been devised and one method includes the orientation of the drill pipe as it is lowered into the hole; this method is subject to the disadvantage that considerable additional time is required for the running of the pipe while the various determinations and measurements are made.

More recently so-called bottom hole methods of tool orientation have been used wherein the drill pipe is lowered in the usual manner after which a well survey instrument is lowered through the drill pipe to the lower end thereof and a record is made; the instrument is then retrieved and brought to the surface so that the record may be read and interpreted to obtain information regarding the position of the deiiecting tool. Although the bottom hole methods of orientation are somewhat faster than those wherein the entire drill pipe must be oriented as it is run, such bottom hole method still requires some rig time since the rig is idle while the instrument is run, operated, retrieved and the record interpreted. During this interval the drill pipe must remain stationary which is undesirable because of the danger of cave-in of the formation with the resultant possibility of sticking the entire drill string.

Some attempts have been made, as exemplified by the prior patent to Palmer, 2,012,138, to provide a method whereby a signal is transmitted to the surface when the deiiecting tool reaches a known azimuthal position but up to the present time, these methods have proven impractical because the fluid column in the bore hole absorbs the signal before it reaches the surface and particularly in bore holes of deeper depths no signal is obtainable at the surface.

vIt is one object of this invention to provide an improved method for orienting a well tool within a well bore, wherein the tool and drill pipe may be lowered into the bore hole in the usual manner, after which the circulating pumps may be operated to effect an automatic orientation of the well tool, whereby no rig time is lost in setting said tool.

An important object of the invention is to provide an improved orientation method for deiiecting tools which includes, the step of lowering the deecting tool on the drill pipe in the normal manner, then utilizing the usual drilling fluid which is circulated downwardly through the drill pipe to impart a rotation to the deecting tool, and finally locking the deiiecting tool in the desired oriented position upon said tool reaching such position, whereby the tool is properly oriented by merely carrying out the usual operations which are normally required so that no additional time is needed for orientation, as is the case with the orientation methods now in general use.

Another object is to provide an improved orienting apparatus for well tools wherein the pressure of the normally circulated drilling fluid is utilized to effect the orientation and to lock the tool in its oriented position.

Still another object is to provide an orienting apparatus, of the character described, wherein the well tool is rotatably mounted on the lower portion of the drill pipe and wherein pressureactuated means having connection with the tool functions to rotate said tool into oriented position, together with a compass unit and connecting means for rotatably connecting the well tool to the drill pipe when the tool reaches a predetermined oriented position; said compass unit controlling actuation of the connecting means in an automatic manner, whereby the orientation of the tool is accomplished in a minimum time and with substantially no additional work on the part of the operator.

Still a further object is to provide an orienting apparatus which is adapted to be connected in the drill pipe and which is extremely rugged in construction, whereby it forms part of the drill string and does not interfere with the usual drilling operations.

A particular object is to provide a well tool orienting apparatus having a tubular piston therein which upon movement co-acts with an inner actuating mandrel to impart rotative movement thereto, with said mandrel having connection with the well tool to be oriented to rotate said tool; the apparatus also including-compass-controlled electrically operated means for operating a connecting element which functions to set up a driving rotative connection between the well tool and the drill pipe when the tool reaches a predetermined oriented position, whereby a subsequent drilling operation in a desireddirection may be carried out.

Another object of the invention is to provide an apparatus for orienting a well tool within a well bore which is constructed'so that the tool may be oriented after which the apparatus may be reset and the tool again oriented without removal from the well bore, whereby an accurate check to assure that proper orientation of the tool has been effected may be accomplished.

The construction designed to carry out the invention will be hereinafter described together with other features of the invention.

The invention will be more readily understood from a reading of the following specification and by reference to the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof, wherein an example of the invention is shown, and wherein:

Figure 1 is an elevation of an orienting apparatus, constructed in accordance with the invention, connected in the drill string and illustrating the deflecting tool to be oriented as a whipstock, with the assembly being shown in a well bore prior to orientation of the tool,

Figure 2 is a similar view illustrating a drilling operation being performed off of the face of the deilecting tool,

Figure 3 is a transverse, vertical sectional view of the upper portion of the apparatus,

Figure 4 is a continuation of Figure 3, showing the intermediate portion of the tool with the actuating piston in a raised position,

Figure 5 is a continuation of Figure 4, illustrating the lower portion of the tool,

Figure 6 is a view, similar to Figure 4 of the intermediate portion of the tool with the actuating piston in a lowered position,

Figure '7 is a horizontal, cross-sectional view, taken on the line 'I-'I of Figure 3,

Figure 8 is a horizontal. cross-sectional view, taken on the line 8-8 of Figure 3,

Figure 9 is a horizontal, cross-sectional view, taken on the line 9-9 of Figure 4, and

Figure 10 is a schematic view of the compass unit arrangement and its relationship to the operating mandrel.

In the drawings, the numeral I0 designates a drill pipe which is adapted to be connected with the usual drill bit II by means of the improved orienting apparatus A. A whipstock I2 having the usual collar I3 encircles the bit shank and is connected thereto by means of a frangible shear pin I4. The bore I3'a of the whipstock collar is of lesser diameter than the outside diameter of the bit blades IIa of the bit and therefore when the pin I4 has been sheared the bit may be utilized to retrieve the whipstock. The particular whipstock and bit arrangement forms no part of the present invention but is the usual construction employed in the directional drilling of well bores.

The assembly which includes the drill pipe I 0, orienting apparatus A, drill bit II and whipstock I2 is adapted to be lowered within a well bore W Within which a directional drilling operation is to be carried out. Upon reaching the position at which the whipstock I2 is to be set the lower end of the whipstock is engaged with the bottom of the well bore or with a plug (not shown) within said bore, and after the whipstock face ,I2a is properly oriented, as will be explained, the pin I4 is sheared to disconnect the bit and drill pipe from the whipstock. It is then possible to carry out a directional drilling operation as illustrated in Figure 2 with the drill bit II being guided downwardly along the inclined face I2a of the whipstock. After the directional drilling operation which forms an angular or deflected bore W' is complete the drill pipe I0 and bit II are pulled upwardly and the engagement of the bit with the whipstock collar functions to retrieve the whipstock as the drill pipe is withdrawn from the bore.

The foregoing is usual directional drilling practice and the present invention resides in the apparatus A which is adapted to effect an orientation or proper positioning of the whipstock I2 whereby the face of said-whipstock is disposed in a desired compass or azimuthal position so that drilling in a desired direction may be subsequently carried out. The apparatus A is clearly shown in Figures 3 to 5 and includes a main tubular body or casing 20 which has its upper end connected through a coupling 2I with a special sub 22. The upper portion of the sub has a threaded connection with the lower end of the drill pipe I0. The main body 20 has an axial bore 20a and a tubular piston 23 is slidably mounted within said bore. The piston 23 is nonrotatable within the body 20 and is held against rotation therein by means of elongate keys 24 secured to the piston and movable within vertically extending grooves or recesses 25 provided in the wall of the bore of the body. The piston 23 is normally urged toward an upper position as shown in Figure 4 by means of a trio of coiled springs 26 which are conned between the under side of the piston and a supporting ring 2'I which is welded or otherwise secured to the inner wall of the body nearer the lower end thereof. Guide pins or bolts 28 and 29 secured to the lower end of the piston 23 and upper surface of the ring 2'I, respectively, function to retain the ends of each spring 26 in place. Any desired number of springs may be provided but as illustrated in Figure 9, three springs 26 have been found suicient to maintain the piston 23 in its uppermost position. The piston has an axial bore 23a, the upper end of which is closed by a transverse plate 30, which plate is formed with fluid ports or openings 3I. A suitable packing ring 32 seals off between the piston and the bore of the body 20.

The piston 23 will be hereinafter referred to as the actuating piston and as noted this piston is normally maintained in its uppermost position by the springs 26. The piston is adapted to impart a rotation to an operating mandrel. which mandrel is disposed within the bore 23a of the piston. The external surface-of the mandrel 33 is formed with a spiral or helical groove 34 and an actuating pin 35 which is secured in the inner wall of the body 23 engages within the groove 34. When the piston is in a raised position the actuating pin is nearer the upper end of the spiral or helical groove 34 of the mandrel 33 as is shown in Figure 4. Upon downward movement of the piston within the bore 20a of the body 20 the coaction between the actuating pin 35 and the spiral groove 34 will impart a rotation to the mandrel 33. The mandrel is provided with an axial bore 36 extending entirely therethrough and the upper end of the bore is closed by a cover or plate member 3'I having fluid openings or ports 38 therein. A suitable packing ring 39 carried by the upper end of the mandrel seals oi between the mandrel and the bore 23a of the piston.

An elongate rod or stem 40 has its lower end secured in the cover member 31 of the mandrel 33 and this rod extends upwardly through a central opening 4I provided in the cover plate 30 which closes the upper end of the piston. A suitable packing ring 42 seals olf between the rod 40 andthe plate 30. The rod or stem proasomo? jects upwardly through the bore 2|a, of thev cou-j pling 2| and then into an axial chamber 43 which is formed within the sub 22. The chamber 43 has its lower end closed by a closure disc 44 and sealing oil around the rod 40 which enters the chamber 43 is accomplished by a seal lring 45. The upper end of the rod carries a compass unit B which will hereinafter be described in detail and said compass unit is disposed within the chamber 43. The sub 22' is provided with a plurality of fluid circulating passages 46 which are spaced equally around the chamber 43 and said passages establish communication between the interior of the drill pipe In and the area above theactuating piston 23; in other words, said passages provide by-passes around` the chamber 43 within which the compass unit B is housed.

It will be evident that with the piston in its raised position as illustrated in Figure 4, the actuating pin 35 will be disposed within the upper portion of the spiral groove 34 in the operating mandrel. When pressure fluid is conducted downwardly through the drill stem I0, this iluid is directed through the by-pass openings 46 and against the upper end of the tubular piston 23 to move said piston downwardly against the pressure of the springs 26. As will be explained, the mandrel 33 is held against longitudinal movement with respect to the piston and the downward movement of the piston will result in the actuating pin 35 coacting with the spiral slot 34 of the mandrel to impart a rotation to the mandrel. This rotation of the mandrel will rotate the rod or stem 40 which carries the compass unit B and will result in a rotation of the outer casing of said compass unit.

The compass unit B is clearly shown in Figures 7, 8 and 10 and includes an outer cylindrical casing 41 which has its upper end closed by an adjustable cover member 48. A compass card 49 is mounted on a suitable pivot 50 on the base of the casing and the casing as well as the special sub '22 is constructed of a non-magnetic material whereby the compass may be attracted to magnetic north in the usual manner. The compass card is provided with a radially extending lightadmitting slot which is located at a desired compass point; as shown, the slot 5| is located opposite the indication north The adjustable cover 48 for the casing 41 is also formed with a radially disposed light-admitting slot 52 and this slot may be adjusted in any desired angular relationship in vertical planes with respect to the slot 5| of the compass card. A light source 53 is carried by a bracket 54 secured to the cover and said light source is in alignment with the radial slot 52 in said cover so as to direct light rays downwardly through said slot. The rotatable rod or stem 40 has a photoelectric cell 56 mounted thereon by means of anlv adjustable clamp 51 and this photoelectric cell is aligned in a vertical plane with the light source and slot 52.

It will be evident that by observing Figure is 10 that the light source is constantly directing a beam of light through the slot 52 in the cover of the casing 41 and the light beam attempting to reach the photoelectric cell in alignment with When the slot 52 in the casing 41 becomes aligned with the slot 5| in the compass card the light beam passes to the photoelectric cell 56 and closes an electric circuit as will be hereinafter explained and halts further rotation of the mandrel. Rotation of the mandrel is utilized to rotate the whipstock |2 and thus, when the circuit is closed by the rotation of the compass unit into a position allowing the light beam to strike the photoelectric cell further rotation of the whipstock will be prevented. It is evident that by properly adjusting the slot 52 in the cover 48 of the casing with respect to the north point, as represented by the slot 5| in the compass card, it will be possible to dispose the whipstock face in any desired position.

For transmitting the rotation of the mandrel 33 to the whipstock the lower end of the mandrel is formed with a counter-bore 58 and the shoulder formed between this counter-bore and the main bore36 of the mandrel isformed with ratchet teeth 59.. A ratchet head 60 is formed at the upper end of a connecting mandrel 6| and the connecting mandrel is rotatably coupled to the operating mandrel 33 by a connecting pin 62 on the operating mandrel which engages an annular groove 63 below the ratchet head 60 of the connecting mandrel. It is. noted that the groove 63 .is of` greater width than the pin 62 whereby the mandrels may undergo a limited longitudinal kmovement with respect to each other. The connecting mandrel 6|` has a gear ring 64 secured thereon soas to be rotatable therewith and this gear ring is disposed within the lower portion of the bore of the body. The gear ring is mounted on ball bearings 65 which are supported on an internal shoulder 66 formed within the body. A shank Bla extends downwardly from the gear ring 64 and has its lower end projecting from the lower end of the body 20. I'his shank is connected by the usual type of connecting sub 61 with the drill bit Il. As illustrated, the shear pin I4 connects the whipstock collar I3 with the sub .61 which in eiect forms an extension of the shank of the bit Il.

The gear ring 64 is formed with ratchet type gear teeth 68 on its upper surface and it is apparent that since the gear ring has connection withthe mandrel 6I a rotation of this mandrel by the operating mandrel 33 will impart rotation to the gear ring as well as to the depending shank 6|0L and sub 61 connected therewith. With the sub 61 pinned to the whipstock collar through the shear pin I4 it will be evident that a rotation of the operating mandrel 33 will result in a rotation of the whipstock.

For halting the rotation of-the whipstock when said whipstock reaches a predetermined oriented position a clutch collar 69 surrounds the connecting mandrel 6I and is slidable thereon, said collar being disposed Within the lower portion of the body 20 above the gear ring 64. The clutch collar is formed with ratchet type teeth 10 on its lower end which are adapted to inter-engage with the teeth 68 of the gear ring. The clutch collar is keyed within the body by keys 1| which engage the longitudinal grooves or recesses 25 which are formed in the wall of the bore 20a of the body 20.

The clutch collar 69 is normally held in a raised position with respect to the gear ring 64 by means of a spring pressed latch 12 which is pivoted on the supporting ring 21 located within the lower portion of the body. An electrical solenoid 13 has its armature 14 engaging the latch and 7 when the solenoid is energized the latch 12 is swung to disengage its end from beneath an overhanging shoulder 15 formed in the upper end of the clutch collar 69. Thus, when the solenoid is energized the clutch collar is released by the latch 12 to permit said collar to fall downwardly into an engagement with the gear ring 64. Since the collar 69 is keyed within the body which is stationary due to its being connected with' the drill stem it will be evident that engagement of the collar with the gear ring will halt further rotation of the connecting mandrel and whipstock as well as further rotation of the operating mandrel 33. The power for the electrical solenoid 13 as well as for the electric lamp 53 of the com- I pass unit is supplied by a dry cell battery 16 (Figure 9) which is disposed within the lower portion of the body between two of the springs 26. Suitable wires (not shown) extend from the battery to the solenoid and upwardly from the solenoid to a commutator brush 11 mounted within the upper portion of the body 20 (Figure 4). The brush 11 is in constant engagement with a cornmutator ring 18 mounted on the rotating rod or shaft 40 and the ring is electrically connected through wires which may extend through the stem or rod 40 within the photoelectric cell 56 and the lamp 53.

In the operation of the apparatus the compass unit is rst properly adjusted to locate the slot 52 in the cover of the compass unit casing 41 in a proper angular relationship to theslot 5| in the compass. This angular position is determined j by the position which the whipstock face is to assume when it is set within the well bore W. Ify

the slot 52 is in vertical alignment with. the whipstock face it will be evident that the circuit is closed through the photoelectric cell when the whipstock is due north because it is at this time that the light beam will pass through the alignedr` slots 52 and 5|. However, if the slot 52 is misaligned angularly in a vertical plane with respect to the whipstock face, the electrical circuit will be closed when the whipstock face is the adjusted number of degrees from north.

After the slot 52 has been properly adjusted in a predetermined manner with respect to the face |2a of the whipstock I2 the apparatus is assembled as shown in Figure l with the whipstock being connected to the inner mandrel assembly to the shear pin. At this time the actuating piston 23 is in a raised position and is held so by the springs 26 with the clutch collar being latched in its upper disengaged position.

Upon reaching the bottom of the well bore or upon striking the plug within the bore at which elevation the whipstock is to be set, the apparatus is raised slightly off of bottom and the circulation of the usual drilling Iluid under pressure is carried out. This drilling uid under pressure will ilow downwardly through the drill pipe and through the by-passes 46 around the compass unit chamber 43 and will be applied to the upper end of the actuating piston 23. As the piston moves downwardly under this pump pressure the coaction between the pin 35 of the spiral groove 34 will impart a rotation to the operating mandrel 33 which will through its ratchet tooth connection 59 impart a similar rotation to the connecting mandrel 6| and the sub 61 to which the whipstool: is connected. Thus, the application of fluid pressure to the piston 23 will result in a rotation of the whipstock I 2.

At the same time that the whipstock is being rotated rotation is imparted to the compass unit casing 41 through the stem or rod 40 and this causes the slot 52 in the cover of said casing to rotate around until it becomes aligned with the slot 5| in the compass card. The slot 5| in the compass card, as has been explained, is representative of the north position. Upon alignment of the slots 52 and 5| a light beam is projected to the photoelectric cell which functions to close the electrical circuit to the relay or solenoid 13' and such solenoid actuates the latch 12 to permit the floating clutch collar 69 to drop downwardly into engagement with the gear ring 64. The gear ring, being secured to the mandrel, will immediately halt further rotation of the mandrel because the gear ring is thereby locked through the clutch collar with the body 23 to which the drill pipe is connected. Thus, as soon as the slots 52 and 5| are aligned further rotation of the whipstock by the rotating mandrel 33 is prevented. The slots having previously been adjusted the alignment of said slots locates the whipstock in the desired oriented position. The continued application of pump pressure will cause the circulating fluid to pass downwardly through the bore 23a of the piston 23 and then through the bore 36 of the operating mandrel 33. From this point the fluid will ow through an axial bore 19 formed in the connecting mandrel 6| and shank Gla and through the tubular connecting sub 61 to the bit Il. It is noted that this circulation will be in a normal manner except for the slight restrictions which will be formed by the openings 3| and 38 in the closures 30 and 31 of the piston 23 and mandrel 33, respectively,

After orientation of the whipstock is complete the assembly is moved downwardly to engage the bottom of the whipstock with the lower end of the well bore or with a cement plug and the weight of the drill pipe is then utilized to cause the body 20 to move downwardly a slight distance until the ring 21 within the body engages the upper end of the clutch collar 69. The continued imposition of weight of the drill pipe is then transferred through the clutch collar and gear ring to the sub 61 and since the whipstock is held stationary by its engagement with the bottom of the well the weight of the drill pipe may be utilized to shear the pin I4 and thereafter a continued downward movement of the drill pipe will cause the drill bit to travel downwardly along the whipstock face and subsequent rotation of the drill pipe will perform the directional drilling operation. When the directional drilling operation is completemit is only necessary to lift upwardly on the drill pipe and the shoulder 66 within the lower portion of the body 23l will engage the gear ring 64 to lift the bit into engagement with the whipstock collar, whereby the whipstock may be retrieved upon withdrawal of the drill pipe.

One of the features of the orienting apparatus is that said apparatus may be reset any number of times in the event that the operator is not satised that the rst setting is correct. Assuming the apparatus to be in the position shown in Figure 4 prior to the setting the pump pressure is applied to rotate the inner mandrel and the compass unit casing 41. Upon proper alignment of the light-admitting slots 5| and 52 the clutch collar is unlatched and dropped into engagement with the gear ring to lock the whipstock against further rotation. If it is now desired to reset the apparatus and again orient thewhipstock the drill pipe may be lowered until the whipstock strikes the bottom of the well bore which renders the gear ring 64 and its attached connecting tdifibn new.

9. mandrel 6l stationary. Further lowering of the drill pipe causes the body 23 to move downwardly a slight distance with respect to the gear ring 64 and since the body carries the latch the lower end of the latch may be reengaged with the clutch collar 69. Then by lifting the drill pipe and bodBr the clutch collar` 69 will be lifted and returned to the position shown in Figure 4. At this time pump pressure can again be applied to the piston which had been previously returned to its original position by release of pump pressure to again operate the apparatus and reorient the whipstock. It is therefore possible to reset and reorient the whipstock any number of times before actu-ally shearing the pin I4.

The ratchet connection 59 and 60 between the operating mandrel 33 and the mandrel 6I which carries the gear ring is provided for the purpose of allowing the actuating piston 23 to return to its upper position when pump pressure is released and without imparting a reverse rotation to the mandrel 6|. It will be evident that after the piston has been moved downwardly to the position shown in Figure 6 a release of pump pressure will cause the springs 26 to return the piston to its upper position. Upon such return the coaction between the actuating pin 35 and the spiral slot 34 will rotate the mandrel 33 in a reverse direction. Such reverse rotation of the mandre1 33 may occur through the ratchet 59 without imparting such reverse rotation to the connecting mandrel 6I and its attached parts.

The apparatus provides an efficient orienting apparatus which may be connected in the drill string and which will effectively orient a well tool. It is apparent that the drill pipe may be run into the well bore in the usual manner and without any loss of time; after reaching bottom it is only necessary to begin circulation of the usual drilling fluid under pressure and this pressure nuid functions to properly orient the tool. After orientation the subsequent drilling operation may be immediately carried out. There is no necessity for orienting the drill pipe into the well nor is there any instrument required for making a record which must be interpreted before final setting of the tool can be made. The apparatus thus provides means for orientation of well tools without the necessity of any additional or auxiliary operations and without the loss of any regular time. The construction of the apparatus makes it possible to reset and reorient the tool several times which will assure that the position of the tool is in the desired azimuthal position.

From the foregoing it will be seen that this invention is one well adapted to attain al1 of the ends and objects hereinabove set forth, together with other advantages which are obvious and which are inherent to the Structure.

It will be understood that certain features and subcombinations are of utility and may be employed without reference to other features and subcombinations. This is contemplated by and is within the scope of the claims.

As many possible embodiments may be made of the invention without departing from the scope thereof, it is to be understood that all matter herein set forth or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Having described the invention, I claim:

1. A well tool orienting apparatus including, a tubular body adapted to be connected with a drill pipe, a mandre1 rotatably mounted within 10 the body and connected with the well tool to be oriented, pressure-actuated means within the body having an operative connection with the mandrel for imparting rotation to the mandrel and well tool, and connecting means for connecting the mandrel to the body for preventing further rotation of the mandrel with respect to the body when the mandrel has undergone a rotation which locates the well tool connected thereto in a predetermined azimuthal position.

2. A Well tool orienting apparatus including, a tubular body adapted to be connected with a drill pipe, a mandre1 rotatably mounted within the body and connected with the well tool to be oriented, pressure-actuated means within the body having an operative connection with the mandrel for imparting rotation to the mandrel and well tool, and connecting means for connecting the mandrel to the body for preventing further rotation of the mandre1 with respect to the body, and a compass unit mounted within the body for operating the connecting means when the well tool has been rotated into a predetermined azimuthal position.

3. A well tool orienting apparatus including, a tubular body adapted to be connected with a drill pipe, a mandre1 rotatably mounted within the body and connected with the well tool to be oriented, pressure-actuated means within the body having an operative connection with the mandrel for imparting rotation to the mandrel and well tool, a compass unit carried by the rotatable mandrel, interengageable co-acting means on said mandre1 and within the body for connecting these parts to prevent independent rotation of the mandrel relative to the body, and electrically operated means controlled by the compass unit for controlling the interengageable means, whereby the mandrel and body are connected together when said mandrel has rotated the well tool into a predetermined azimuthal position.

4. An orienting apparatus vfor well tools including, a tubular body adapted to be connected with a drill pipe and lowered therewith within a well bore, a mandrel rotatably mounted within the body and connected with the well tool to be oriented, a piston slidably mounted within the bore of the body and movable downwardly therein by the pressure of a fluid circulated downwardly through the drill pipe and body, and co-acting means on the piston and mandrel for converting the downward movement of the piston into a rotative motion, whereby the mandrel is rotated to rotate the well tool into a predetermined oriented position.

5. An orienting apparatus for well tools including, a tubular body adapted to be connected with a drill pipe and lowered therewith within a well bore, a mandrel rotatably mounted within the body and connected with the well tool to be oriented, a piston slidably mounted within the bore of the body and movable downwardly therein by the pressure of a fluid circulated downwardly through the drill pipe and body, coacting means on the piston and mandrel for converting the downward movement of the piston into a rotative motion, whereby the mandrel is rotated to rotate the well tool, and means for halting the rotative movement of the mandrel and well tool when the well tool is located in a predetermined azimuthal position within the well bore.

6. An orienting apparatus for well tools including, a tubular body adapted to be connected with a drill pipe and lowered therewith tWithin a Well 11 bore, a. mandrel rotatably mounted within the body and connected with the Well tool to be oriented, a piston slidably mounted within the bore of the body and movable downwardly therein by the pressure of a fluid circulated downwardly through the drill pipe and body, co-acting means on the piston and mandrel for converting the downward movement ofthe piston into a rotative motion, whereby the mandrel is rotated to rotate the well tool, normally disengaged means on the mandrel and tubular body for connecting said mandrel and body to prevent relative rotation of the mandrel with respect to thebody, and acompass unit carried by the mandrel for controlling the engagement of the normally disengaged means whereby said last-named means is engaged when the mandrel has been rotated to locate the well tool in a predetermined'azimuthal position.

7. An orienting apparatus for welltools including, a tubular body adapted to be connected with a drill pipe and lowered therewith within a well bore, a mandrel rotatably mounted within the body andA connected with the well tool to be oriented, a pistonslidably mounted within .the bore of the body and movable downwardly therein by the pressure vof a iluid `circulated downwardly through the drill pipe'and bo'dy, co-acting means on the piston 'and mandrel for converting the downward movement of the piston into a rotative motion, whereby the mandrel 'is'rotated to rotate the well to'ol, a toothed gear ring on the mandrel, a complementary gear collar keyed within the body and adapted when engaged with the ring to connect the mandrel and body together to prevent furtherindependent rotative movement of the mandrel relative to the collar, and means for normally holding the collar out of engagement with the ring and for'engaging said collar and ring -when the mandrel has rotated the`well .tool'into a predetermined azi' lwardly through thev drill pipe and body, co-acting means on the piston and mandrel for con# verting the downward movement of the piston into a rotative motion, whereby the mandrel is rotated to rotate the well tool, a toothed gear ring on the mandrel, a complementary gear Acollar keyed within the body and adapted when engaged with the ring to connect the mandrel and body together to prevent further independent rotative movement of the mandrel relative to the collar. a latch for normally holding the gear out of engagement with the gear ring, and means for operating said latch to engage the collar and ring when the mandrel has rotated the well tool into apredetermined azimuthal position.

9. An orienting apparatus as set forth in claim 8, wherein the means for operating said latch comprises an electrical solenoid and a compass unit carried by the mandrel and having electrical circuit closing means for closing the electrical circuit to the solenoid when the mandrel has rotated the well tool into a predetermined azimuthal position.

10. An orienting apparatus for a dellecting tool including, a tubular body adapted to be connected with a drill pipe and lowered therewith within a well bore, a mandrel rotatably mounted within the body and extending'from one end thereof and connected withthe deiiecting tool to beoriented, a tubular piston slidablewithin the body and interposed between the mandrel' and borevofthe body and normally maintained in a raised position within the body, a co-acting pin and spiral slot connection between the piston and mandrel whereby movement of the piston rotates the mandrel and deflecting tool relative to the body,

said piston being movable downwardly by pressure fluid circulated downwardly through the drill pipe and body, and means for halting rotation of the mandrel with respect to the body when the mandrel has rotated the' well tool to a predetermined azimuthal position.

ll. An orienting apparatus asv set forth in claim 10, wherein the means for halting therotation of the'mandrel relative to the tubular body comprises a gear ring mounted on the mandrel land a gear collar keyed withinthe bore of the ody.

l2. An orienting apparatusV as set forth in claim l0, wherein the means for halting the rotation of the mandrel relative to thetubular body comprises a gear ring mountedon' the mandrel and a gear collar keyed within the bore of the No references cited.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification166/66, 166/117.5
International ClassificationE21B7/08, E21B47/024, E21B47/02, E21B7/04
Cooperative ClassificationE21B47/024
European ClassificationE21B47/024