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Publication numberUS2567758 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 11, 1951
Filing dateDec 1, 1945
Priority dateDec 1, 1945
Publication numberUS 2567758 A, US 2567758A, US-A-2567758, US2567758 A, US2567758A
InventorsAshley Carlyle M
Original AssigneeCarrier Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air-conditioning method
US 2567758 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. ll, 1951 c. 4M. yASHLEY AIR CONDITIONING METHOD 2 sheets-sheet 1 Filed Decv. 1, 1945 INI/EN TOR.

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Sept. 1l, 1951 c. M. ASHLEY 2,557,353

' AIR CONDITIONING METHOD l A Filed Dec. 1, 1945 I 2 sheets-sheet 2 INVENTOR. ay n" @M mesas sq. u, 1951 n uNiTED STAT was Es PATENT gpg-Fmg sciita A* .d A. culylesmn. Y, m e i Carrier Corporation, Syracuse. Ni Y., a corporation of Delaware Anuman pmmtf11 ,f194s.sermso; 2,1511

l This invention relates to air conditioning'. Many factors, such as transmission gains or losses. sun load. people. lights, etc., enterinto the `air conditioning of large buildings containing a.

plurality of enclosed areas since the heat loads ail'ecting the dierent areas of the conditioned building necessarily vary; For example, in an oillce building, all of the omces having windows facing the east would be subjected to the heating eil'ect of the sun early in the day whereas the heat load due to sun effect will decrease later in the day. Factors other than sun load are als'oof major importance. For example, if certain oflices ordinarily contain several occupants while other oilices contain only one occupant, the heat loads in such oillces vary. In addition, some spaces may require illumination a major portion of the day while other omces require little or no illumination; necessarily. this affects the heat loads of such oilices to a. greater or lesser degree depending upon the degree of illumination required.

An air conditioning system in extensive use contemplates the separation of a building into zones in accordance with the various heat loads present in the rooms or oilices thereof. In such system, air from the exterior of the building in a quantity adequate for ventilation requirements is treated at a central conditioning point remote from the areas to be conditioned to control the moisture content thereof in accordance with the requirements of the various zones, then treated in accordance with the factors of heat load in each zone, and distributed at relatively high static pressure and at relatively high velocity toa plurality of units disposed in andv serving a plurality [of areas to be conditioned in the various zones. The high pressure air supplied to leach unitV is y' Iit is thatsome zones of the building be .many controls required to a building divided into numerous zones.

supplied with warm water while other portions oi' the buildingA are supplied with cold water.

i Asxstated above. this system' is highly satisfactory and has entered into extensive use. It is somewhat'complicated, however. due to` the lcondition adequately by adjustment'of the temperature of the conditionedair ata point remote from the areas to be conditioned andyinkwhichthe variable heat gains such assun load;lights. people, and the like are 'sus compensatedforb'y varying individually in each ,area 'the temperature of the inducedair in accordance. iivi'th `the 'variable' heat factors present insuch area,"

#A son further 'vtject 'is no provide, al method of airV conditioningin which aquantityfoffair discharged therein at high velocity, inducing a relatively great circulation ci" air withdrawn from the area served by the unit. The primary or high pressure air and the secondary or induced air are then supplied to the conditioned area to maintain a desired temperature therein. Tempering means such as coils or the like are disposed in the various local units to eilect cooling or heating of air circulating through the unitas required; in the operation of the system, cold water is furnished to the tempering means under summer conditions. and warm water is furnished to the tempering means under winter conditions. It will be appreciated depending upon the heat load in eachzone, cold or warm water may be supplied to any zone in winter or in sumsuflicientfor ventilation requirements issupplied yto variousv areas. the airvbeing first conditioned to compensate for transmission gains or losses in such areas, and in which'the variable-heatfactors are compensated for vby adjustingthe dry bulb temperature fir sensible heat of each area being conditioned in accordance with its individual requirements. Y

A still further Vobject is to provide a method of air conditioning in which the conditioning medium supplied to the various areas, to compensate for the variable heat factors is passed n after passage through such areas in heat exmer. Under intermediate operating conditions, II

change relation with air to be conditioned and supplied to the various areas.

A still further object is to provide a'method of air conditioning in which conditioning medium for induced air is supplied to the various areas. the temperature of the conditioning medium being adjusted at a point remote from the areas to be conditioned in accordance with the err--` terior temperature of the structure and in which a second supply of conditioning medium is provided lfor each of thejareas being conditioned which' isadapted 4to adjust the temperature of induced airin accordance with the variable heat factors present ineach individual area.

The present invention relates to a method of air conditioning a building structure containing a plurality of enclosed areas` in which the steps comprise supplying a quantity of air sunlcient for ventilation requirements of the enclosed areas, conditioning air to control its moisture content while varying its sensible heat to compensate for transmission gains or losses through- Yout the enclosed areas, supplying the conditioned vair at high static pressure to conditioning units disposed in the enclosed areas. discharging the conditioned air at high velocity within each unit to induce a substantial flow of secondary air within the unit from the enclosed areas in which it is disposed, varying the temperature of the induced air in each area to compensate for the effect of the variable sensible heat factors present in such area, mixing the streams of conditioned air and induced air, and discharging ythe mixture of conditioned air and induced air within the area to be conditioned. In some cases, the'conditioning medium from the` conditioning unit may be withdrawn and passed in -heat 'exchange relation ywith airl to be conditioned.

Thisinvention further relates to a method o1' comprise supplying a quantity of air sumcient for ventilation requirements of the enclosed areas. conditioning air to control its moisture content while varying its sensible heat to compensate for transmission gains or losses throughout the enis provided'to draw air into casing l preferably `from the outdoor atmosphere. the air being conditioned in any desired manner during its passage through casing 2, and vthen to discharge the 'conditioned air'at relatively high staticy pressure into a primary high pressure air duct 5.

`The conditioning apparatus illustrated at 2 may be f `any desired time. and it is understood that the vpresent invention is not limited with respect to the apparatus illustrated. As illustrated, apparatus 2 includes a pluralltyofvdam'py ers 6 'through which air is drawn into casing 8 from the exterior of thebuilding. a preheating f coil 'I through which steam may be passed to preheat air passinginto casing 3, a. filter I, sprays s. a dehumidiication coil III. a plenum II. and a reheating. coilr I2. In such apparatus the air is suitably conditioned in accordance with the requirements of the areas to be conditioned. In

Y air conditioning a building structure containing a l plurality of enclosed areas in which the steps closed areas,v supplying the conditioned air at high static pressure to conditioning units vdisposed inthe enclosed areas. discharging the conditioned air at high velocity within each unit to induce a substantial flow of secondary air within the unit from the enclosed area in which it is disposed, supplying a constantfquantity of conditioning medium at a substantiallyconstant temperature to a heat exchanger disposed in each unit, supplying a second quantity of conditioning medium at a predetermined temperature se-r lected in accordance with the temperature exteriorly of the building to a second heat exchanger disposed in each unit, governing the temperature of the induced air by passing at least a lportion thereof lover the heat exchangers, adJusting the temperature of the induced air to compensate for the effect of the variable sensible heat factors present 'in each area by varying the quantity of conditioning medium passing through said first heat exchanger, mixing the streams of conditioned air and induced air, and discharging the mixture of conditioned air and induced air within the area to be conditioned.

T he attached drawing illustrates a preferred embodiment of my invention in which:

Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view illustrating an `airconditioning system embodying my invenff `tion;

addition. reheating coil I2 is provided to adjust the sensible heat of the conditioned air to compensate for transmission gains or losses throughout the 'building being conditioned.

Conditioned primary air is forced through-duct 5 by fan I and through ducts I3 to the conditioning units I 4, shown in Figure 4, disposed in l reheating coil I2. The dry bulb temperature or Figure 2 is 'a fragmentary diagrammatic view ofa portion of the system shown in Figure l. illustrating a modification thereof;

vFigure 3 is a fragmentary diagrammatic view of'a portion of the system shown in Figure l. il-

' lustrating a further modification thereof; and

Figure 4 is a diagrammatic view illustrating deaus or the conditioning unit.

Referring to the drawing, there is shown suitable air conditioning apparatus designated generally at 2, such apparatus being contained in a casing 3. The apparatus may be disposed many y suitable place in the basement. attic ora storage spaceof a building served thereby. A fan 4 the sensible heat of the conditioned air is ad'- 'justed in accordance with the dry bulb temperature Lexteriorly of"` the building in order to compensate for transmission gains or lossesthrough-V out the areas being conditioned. Bulb II disposed in the path of air having its dry bulb temperature adjusted to compensate for transmission gains or losses also actuates thermostat T to increase or to decrease the amount ofsteam passing into reheating coil I2. If desired, return air from the areas being conditioned may be fed through duct 20 (shown in dotted outline) into plenum II and mixed with the conditioned'air before its temperature is adjusted by reheating coil I2.

I have shown a cooler 22 adaptedtoiprovide conditioning medium at a l,predetermined temperature for use within the system. The cooler 22 may comprise any suitable refrigerating apparatus adapted to cool a conditioning medium suchas water. Water is conducted from cooler 22\ through pipe 23 to pump 24 which forces the conditioning medium throughpipe 25 to the defhumidifying coilv I0 lof apparatus 2. Water from dehumidifyingcoil I0 passes through pipe 25 to riser 21 adapted `to supply the conditioning me# dium to the units I4 disposed in various areas I5. A heat exchange member 2l is disposed in eac'h'unit Il. Conditioning medium from heat exchangers 28 then passes through pipe 29 to a return riser 30 and pipe 3| to water cooler 22. A valve 32 is disposed in each pipe leading from riser 21 to each heat exchanger 2l. Valve 22 is controlled by means of a` thermal element` such as a bulb disposed in the path of air 'induced within unit Il. It rwill -belmdersm Il need not be employed whens valve 32 n cooler 22 as described above a suitable cooling i apparatus 2.

iiows through line 3l, valve I! and pipe 28 as Y previously described. Upon its discharge from the various heat exchangers II it ilows through pipes 2l, return riser I0, line Il, and'line Il which returns it to the cooling tower.

to compensate for theventilation requirements l o! the areas being conditioned. The air is conditioned in apparatus 2 to control the moisture content and` sensible heat thereof whereby the sensible heat of the air is variedin accordance with the temperature exteriorly oi' the building to compensate for transmission gains or losses throughout the enclosed areas l5. The conditioned air isthen supplied through primary duct l to ducts Il which supply the conditioned air to units Il. Conditioned air is discharged in units M through nozzles or thelike at a relatively high velocity. The relatively high velocity of the conditioned air within the unit induces a substantial ilow oi' secondary air within the unit irom the enclosed area l5 in which unit Il is disposed.

VCooler 22 supplies conditioning medium within the range oi 45 F. to 70 1". as required to pipe 23; pump 24 forces the conditioning medium through dehumidifping coil lil and through pipe 2t to risers 2l. Conditioning medium ilows from riser 21 through valve 32 to heat exchange member 2l in unit I4. 'Ihe induced air passes over heat exchange member 2l; the temperature of the induced air is governed by its passage over the heat exchanger 28. The quantity change member 2B is varied in accordance with the variable sensible heat factors present in the area by meansoi bulb 34 and valve J2 which control the amount f of conditioning medium passing through heat exchanger 28. By this means the temperature of the induced air is varied to compensate for the eiect of the .variable sensible heat factors present in the areas. The streams of conditioned air and induced air are mixed'in the unit, and the mixtureis then discharged through a grille in the unit to the area to be conditioned.

While I have described the temperature oi the y induced air in each unit as being varied in accordance with the amount oi' conditioning medium owing through heat exchanger, it will be understood the amount oi' conditioning medium ilowing through heat exchanger 2l may be maintained substantiallyconstant; the temperature of the induced air is then varied in accordance with the variable heat factors present in the area by means of a suitable damper Il which varies' the amount of induced air permitted to pass over heat exchanger. In other words. some portion of the induced air is passed Y weather.

oftheinducedairbypassesheatexchangerllal showninligure4. Inthiscasebulbllservesto actuate the actuating mechanism for the damper in accordance with the variable heati'actorl present in the area to determine the quantity o! 'oi air passing over the heat exchanger.

In Figure 2 I have illustrated a modincatlon /oi'my invention which is particularly adapted ior use during conditions oi winter operation. As illustrated a heat exchanger Il is added to Conditioning medium. returning through line ll from heat exchangers 2l ot units I4.` disposed in the various areas Il to be conditioned, is passed 'through heat exchanger Il in heat exchange relation with air from the exterior oi' the building drawn into apparatus 2. Under winter conditions the air entering apparatus 2 is colder than the coldconditioning medium returning through line 2|. By placing the colder air and cold conditioning medium in heat exchange relation. the colder air is preheated and the cold conditioning medium is further cooled, thus reducing'the operating cost of theV system. The conditioning medium passes from heat exchanger 4l to cooler 4I where it is placed in heat exchange relation with water from a cooling tower passing through line I2.to cooler 4i. The water from the cooling tower after its passage through cooler 4I is returned to the cooling tower through line Il. It will be understood by proper control of thevalves in the various lines heat exchanger I0 and the cooling tower may be added to or cut from the system. When the heat exchanger 4l and the cooling tower are cut out of the system. cooler 22 functions as previously described.

In Figure 3 I have illustrated a modiilcation of my ifnvention adapted for use in certain geographic areas subject to yexcessive cold In this case an additional heat exchange member 44 is provided in each unit Il. The temperature of the conditioning medium conducted to exchanger Il is varied in accordance with the exterior'temperature of the building being conditioned. Thus under winter conditions hot water is supplied to exchanger 4l through line 5f and is discharged therefrom through line I6, while under summer conditions cold water is supplied to exchanger u. Coil 2i in each unit is provided with water at a substantially constant-temperature within the range of 45 F. to 70 F; selectedl without regard to exterior temperature. As the variable heat factors in each areabeing conditioned increase or decrease, valve 22 is actuated by bulb u to increase or to `decrease the amount of conditioning medium flowing through heat exchanger 2l. As described, a system such as illustrated in Figure! is particularly desirable for use in localities in which the temperature varia so greatly as to prevent the conditioned air alone effectively compensating for transmission gains or losses.

My invention provides a simplified method of operating an air conditioning system which eliminates the excessive initial and operating costs of systems heretofore usedwhiie permitting adequate results from a standpoint of aiiconditioning to be attained. The method of operation contemplated by the present invention may be applied to existing systems already installed in building structures or the system may be pro-l vided in new construction or buildings now without a system of air conditioning.

While -I have described and illustrated a preferred embodiment of my invention, it will be over -heat exchanger 2l while a second portion 7s understood my invention is not limited thereto annua since it may be-otherwise embodied within the scope 'oi' the following claims. e y

I claim:

V1. In the meuod of air @summoning s' sunding structure containing a plurality o! enclosed areas, the` steps which comprise supplying a quantity ofk air sufiicient for ventilation requirements oi the enclosed areas. conditioning air to control its moisture content while varying `its .sensible heat in accordancey with the tempera-,1 ture exteriorly oi the building to compensate for transmission gains or losses throughout the enclosed areas, supplying the conditioned air at high static pressure to conditioning units disposed in the enclosed areas, discharging the conditioned air at high velocity within each unit to induce a substantial flow oi' secondary air within the unit from the enclosed area in which it is disposed, supplying a quantity of conditioning medium at a temperature within the range o! 45 F.' to 70 F.and selected without regard to the exterior temperature to a heat exchanger disposed Vin each unit, governing the temperature of the inducedfair in each unit by passing at least a portion thereof over the heat'e'xchanger, individually and automaticaly adjusting the temperature oi the induced airin each unit to compensate for the effect of the variable sensible heat factors present in the area, mixing the streams of conditioned air and induced air, and discharging the mixture of conditioned air and induced air within the area to be conditioned to maintain a desired temperature therein. l n 2. In the method of air conditioning a building structure containing a plurality of enclosed areas, the steps which comprise suppbung a quantity of air suilcient for ventilation requirements oi the enclosed areas, conditioning air to control its moisture content While varying its sensible heat in accordance with the'temperature exteriorly of the building to compensate for transmission gains or losses throughout the enclosed areas, supplying the conditioned air at high static pressure 'to conditioning units disposed in the enclosed areas, discharging the conditioned air at high velocity within each unit to induce a substantial flow of secondary air within the unit from the enclosed area in which it is disposed, supplying a quantity of conditioning medium at a substantially constant temperature selected without regard to the exterior temperature to a h eat exchanger disposed in each unit, governing the temperature of the induced air in each unit by passing the induced air over the heat exchanger, varying the quantity of conditioning discharging the' conditionedair at high velocity within each unit to induce a substantial yilow of secondary air within the unit from the enclosed area in which it is disposed. supplying a constant A quantity oi' conditioning medium at a predetermined temperature to a heat exchanger disposed in each unit, passing at least a portion ofthel induced air over the heat exchanger in each unit to control the temperature thereof, varying the temperature of the induced air to compensate i'or the eilect of the variable sensible heat iactors present in each area by increasing or decreasing the quantity of induced air passing over the heat exchanger, mixing the streams of conditioned air and induced air, and discharging the y .mixture of conditioned air and induced air within the area to be conditioned to maintain a desired temperature therein. l

4. In thev method yof air conditioning a building structure containing a plurality of enclosed areas. the steps which comprise supplying a quantity of air suillcient for ventilation requirements oi the determined temperature selected without regard to the exterior temperature to a heat exchanger disposed in each unit, governing the temperature of the induced air in each unit by passing at least a portion thereof over the heat exchanger, varying the temperature of the induced air in each unit to compensate for the eiiect of the variable sensible heat factors present in the area, mixing the streams of conditioned air and induced air, discharging the mixture oi conditioned air and induced air within the area to be conditioned. withdrawing the conditioning medium -from the conditioning units, and passing ,the withdrawn medium passing through the heat exchanger in accordance with the variable sensible heat factors present in each area therebyadjusting the temperature oir the induced air in accordance with the variable heat factors present in'each area,

mixing the streams of conditioned air and induced air, and discharging the mixture of conditioned'air and induced air Within the area to be conditioned to maintain a'desired temperature therein.

3. In the method of air conditioning a building structure containing a plurality of enclosed areas,

the steps which comprise conditioning air to control its moisture content while varying its sensible heat to compensate for transmission gains `ox' losses throughout the enclosed areas, supplying the conditioned air at high staticpressure to conditioning units disposed in the enclosed areas.

conditioning medium 'in heat exchange relation with air to be conditioned. l,

5. -In the method of airconditioning a building Vstructure containing a plurality of enclosed areas,

the steps which comprise supplying a quantity o! air suilicient for ventilation requirements of the enclosed areas, conditioning air to control its moisture content while varying its sensible heat in accordance with the temperature exteriorly of the building to compensate for transmission gains or losses throughout the enclosed areas. supplying the conditioned air at high static pressure to conditioning units disposed in the enclosed areas, discharging the conditioned air at high velocity within each unit to induce a substantial flow of secondary air within the unit from the enclosed area in which it is disposed.

` to the exterior temperature to a heat exchanger supplying a quantity of conditioning medium atl a constant temperature selected without regard disposed in each unit, governing the temperature of the induced air in each unit by passing'the induced air over the heat exchanger, varying the quantity of conditioning medium passing through the heat exchanger in accordance with the variable sensible heat factors present in each. area thereby adlustingthetemperature of the induced sirio compensate for tbe eiort oi' the variable areas, the steps which comprise supplying ay quantity of air suiilcient for ventilation requirements of the enclosed areas, conditioning air to control its moisture content while varying its sensible heat` to compensate for trans.

mission gains or losses throughout the enclosed areas. supplying the conditioned air at high static pressure to conditioning units disposed inthe enclosed areas, discharging the conditioned air at high velocity within each unit to induce a substantial ilow oi' secondary air within the unit from the enclosed area in which it is disposed. supplying a constant quantity of conditioning medium at a predetermined temperature to a heat exchanger disposed in each unit, passing at least -a portion of the induced air over the heat exchanger in each unit to control the temperature Y thereof, varying the temperature of the induced air to compensate for the eii'ect of the variable sensible heat factors present in each area by increasing or decreasing the quantity of induced air passing over the heat exchanger, mixing the streams ot conditioned air and induced air, discharging the mixture of conditioned air and induced air within the area to be conditioned, witndrawing the conditioning medium from the conditioning units, and passing the withdrawn conditioning medium in heat exchange relation with air to be conditioned.

' 7. In the method or air conditioning a building structure containnig a plurality o! enclosed areas. the steps which comprise supplying a quantity ot air suillcient for ventilation requirements or the enclosed areas, conditioning air to control its moisture content while varying its sensible heat in accordance with the temperature exteriorly of the building to compensate for on gains or losses throughout the enclosed areas, supplying the conditioned air at high static pressure to conditioning units disposed in the enclosed areas, discharging the conditioned air at high velocity within each unit to induce a substantial ilow of secondary air within the unit from the enclosed area in`which it is disposed, supplying a quantity oi conditioning medium at a predermined temperature selected without regard t the exterior temperature to a heat exchanger disposed in each unit, supplying a second quantity ot conditioning medium at a predetermined temperature selected in accordance with the temperature exteriorlyoi' the building to a second heat exchanger disposed in each unit, governing the temperature of the induced air in each unit by passing at least a portion thereof over the heat exchangers, adjusting the temperature of th'e induced airto compensate for the eii'ect of the variable sensible heat factors in such area by varying the quantity of conditioning medium passing through said first heat exchanger, mixing the streams of conditioned air and induced air, and discharging the mixture of conditioned air and induced air within the area to be conditioned` 8. In the method'of air conditioning a building structure containing a plurality of enclosed areas. the steps which comprise supplying a quantity of air suiilcient for ventilation requirements of the venclosed areas, conditioning air to control its moisture content while varying its sensible heat in accordance with the temperature exteriorly of the building to compensate for transmission gains or losses throughout the enclosed areas, supplying the conditioned air at high static pressure to conditioning units disposed in the enclosed areas. discharging the conditioned air at high velocity within each unit to induce a substantial ilow of secondary air within the unit from theenclosed area in which it is disposed. supplying a substantially constant quantity or conditioning medium at apredetermined temperature selected without regard to the exterior temperature to a heat exchanger disposed in each unit, supplying a second quantity -of conditioning medium at a tem-- perature'varying in accordance with the temperature exteriorly of the building to a second heat exchanger disposed in each unit, passing at least a portion of the induced air over the heat exchangers in each unit to control the temperature thereof. varying the temperature oi.' the induced air to compensate for the effect of the variable sensible heat factors presentin each area. by increasing or decreasing the quantity of the induced air passing over the first heat exchanger, mixing the streams oi' conditioned air and induced air, and discharging the mixture oi conditioned air and induced air within the area to be conditioned v to maintain fa desired temperature therein.

BEFEREN CES CITED The following references are of record in the nie or this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,363,294 Carrier -.....s. Nov. 21. 1944

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2907178 *Oct 4, 1957Oct 6, 1959Borg WarnerAir conditioning systems
US2913227 *Feb 6, 1956Nov 17, 1959Trane CoAir conditioning unit
US2928260 *Feb 8, 1957Mar 15, 1960Borg WarnerAir conditioning systems
US2962952 *Mar 1, 1957Dec 6, 1960Carrier CorpAir conditioning unit
US2975609 *Jul 30, 1956Mar 21, 1961Svenska Flaektfabriken AbAir conditioning
US2982523 *Jan 24, 1956May 2, 1961Alden I McfarlanAir conditioning system
US3012760 *Mar 1, 1957Dec 12, 1961Carrier CorpAir conditioning units
US3018088 *Jan 20, 1960Jan 23, 1962Svenska Flaektfabriken AbRoom unit for air conditioning
US3041047 *Jan 13, 1956Jun 26, 1962Carrier CorpAir conditioning systems
US3092178 *May 26, 1954Jun 4, 1963Carrier CorpAir conditioning units
US3122201 *May 5, 1960Feb 25, 1964Carrier CorpAir conditioning system
US3172463 *Jun 30, 1959Mar 9, 1965Carrier CorpAir conditioning units
US3213928 *May 29, 1962Oct 26, 1965American Radiator & StandardAir conditioner damper control
US4094167 *Mar 4, 1976Jun 13, 1978Svenska Geotherm AktiebolagHeat pump assembly
DE1114022B *Jul 12, 1956Sep 21, 1961Carrier CorpKlimaanlage
DE1147367B *Nov 23, 1954Apr 18, 1963Svenska Flaektfabriken AbVerfahren und Vorrichtung zum Klimatisieren von Raeumen
DE1274312B *Aug 25, 1965Aug 1, 1968Sulzer AgVerfahren zur Klimatisierung der einzelnen Raeume eines Gebaeudes
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/213, 165/59, 454/264, 62/97, 165/222, 165/243, 62/90
International ClassificationF24F1/01, F24F3/06
Cooperative ClassificationF24F3/06, F24F1/01
European ClassificationF24F1/01, F24F3/06