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Publication numberUS2569603 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 2, 1951
Filing dateAug 29, 1945
Priority dateAug 29, 1945
Publication numberUS 2569603 A, US 2569603A, US-A-2569603, US2569603 A, US2569603A
InventorsGottfried John
Original AssigneeGottfried John
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin selector
US 2569603 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. GOTTFRIED Oct. 2, 1951 COIN SELECTOR Filed Aug. '29., 1945 3 Sheets-Sheet l IN VEN TOR.

22/ oiffmed BW Oct. 2, 1951 J. GOTTFRIED COIN SELECTOR Filed Aug. 29, 1945 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

Oct. 2, 1951 J. GOTTFRIED 2,569,603

COIN SELECTOR Filed Aug. 29, 1945 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Patenteci Oct. 2, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ascaeozi com SELECTOR John Gottfried, St. Louis, Mo.- Application August 29, 1945,'Serial No. 613,302 4 Claims- (01.19am) This invention relates to improvements in coin selectors, and more particularly, to means for segregating legitimate coins from counterfeit coins, slugs, discs, tokens and the like. In the present invention, new and novel improvements in construction, hereinafter described, not only permit increased efficiency, but the apparatus combines features which may be confined in smaller space than heretofore found in conventional types of coin selectors.

It is an object of my invention to provide a coin rejector comprising in combination a coin cradle adapted to receive and be operated by coins of a predetermined weight and size, with means responsive to the movement of the cradle and coin for intercepting such coins when perforated.

- It is a further object to provide means for preventing an undersize or underweight coin from operating or rocking the coin cradle.

The above and other features of novelty, advantages and capabilities will become apparent from the accompanying drawings and description of my invention. The construction shown and described, however, is to be understood as illustrative only, and not as defining the limits of my invention.

With my invention, inserted coins (which term as used herein includes legitimate as well as counterfeit coins, slugs, discs, washers, tokens and the like), while traveling through my device under the influence of gravity, are selected by size, physical characteristics, magnetic conductivity and resilience. It is not only adapted to differentiate between legitimate and spurious coins, but also to differentiate between undersized and oversized legitimate coins, and to directly return legitimate coins of incorrect denomination. Spurious coins of any given denomination for which the apparatus may be adapted, which may pass the test for size, if provided with a hole in the center, are intercepted by a pressure initiated, automatically returned finger which prevents further downward movement of said spurious coin.

Any rejected coin held at intermediate level will prevent downward movement of any other coin, legitimate or spurious, through the coin passageway until said spurious coin is ejected by novel scavenging means, hereinafter described.

The essential features of the improved coin selector apparatus embodying the present invention will be readily understood from a consideration of the appended claims when read in connection with the following specification and the accompanying drawings illustrating one embodiment of the invention, in which:

Figure 1 is a front elevation of the coin selector with the lower left hand portion broken away;

Figure 2 is a plan view of Figure 1 taken through section line 2-2;

Figure 3 is a broken away portion of Figure 1 with certain elements in their displaced positions; r r r Figure 4 is an end elevation of Figure 3 taken through section line l4;

Figure 5 is a broken away portion of Figure 1 with certain elements in further displaced positions; 7

Figure 6 is a broken away portion of Figure 1 with certain elements in furtherdisplaced positions; 1

Figure 7 is an enlarged perspective view of the wire finger and actuating lever for engaging coins with a hole in or near the center, the parts being shown in the positions assumed when a coin with a central hole is suspended byfinger l8, lever l6 then being in a counterclockwise position; V

Figure 8 is an enlarged perspective view of the wire finger shown in Figure 7, the arrows showing the direction of movement of said finger when a coin strikes arm I5 after leaving the cradle, the finger l8 being shown in a position assumed when lever I6 is between its extreme counterclockwise and clockwise positions;

Figure 9 is an enlarged perspective view of the wire finger in Figure 7 the finger l8 being shown in the position assumed when lever I6 is in a clockwise position, finger l8 then feeling the flat surface of apassing coin and in position to enter the hole of any coin with a central perforation; and

Figure 10 is a broken away portion of Figure 1 with certain elements in normal positions, and others in displaced positions.

Referring to Figure 1, the frame or main plate I is a support for all the elements of the coin selector. Pivotally mounted on the main plate I is a gate 2 provided with projecting lugs 3, by means of which the gate 2 swings on pintle 4. Pintle 4 is supported in lugs 5, which are fastened to main plate I. The gate 2 is spaced from the main plate by lugs 5|] (Fig. 2), which limit the inward swing of the free end of the gate. These lugs project from the plate I toward gate 2. Further, lugs 5 are spaced from the main flat body portionof plate I, as clearly shown in Fig. 2. The gate is resiliently held in position by a coil spring 6 (shown in Figure 2) mounted on pintle I and held in tension by washers 8.

In the operation of the coin selector, when a coin isinserted in the slot 9 formed by the outward projection of the gate 2 at its upper lefthand corner, assuming that it is an acceptable legitimate coin of proper diameter and thickness, in falling downward, it will first contact the arm l5 (Figs. 10 and 3) and thereafter the counterweighted cradle l0, which is pivotally supported on the gate 2 at H and held in position by a cotter-pin l2. The cradle I is provided with projections l3" and; I4 extending into the coin passageway through arcuate slots 2| and 33, respectively, cut into the gate 2. When an acceptable coin is inserted in the passageway 9, as shown in Figure 1, it drops by gravity and first strikes the arm l5 and thence bounces down wardly to a position impinging and resting upon projections l3 and M of the cradle. The weight of the coin in that position will cause the coin cradle ID to rotate in a clockwise direction around pivot Ii, if the coin is of sufficient diame er and i ht- .T s. he cr dle. ins f the position illustrated in Figs, and 3, sucqessively through the positions illustrated in Figs. 5 and l and finally to theposition illustrated in Fig, 6. This movementwill project the coin to the right, as shownby the dotted outline of said coin (Figure 5), thus causing said coin to contact arm i5, extending inwardly through a slot in the gate 2 from counterweighted lever l6, pivotally mounted on the. gate 2 at H. One function of arm 5 of lever I6 is; to cause finger l8 (Fig. 4) to be moved out of the path of a coin which has turned the cradle, whereby the coin is permitted tostart its fall past the finger. However, lever [B is counterweighted, whereby after finger I8 is retracted from the space between gate 2 and plate I sufilciently to permit the coin to c ntinue its pro re s... fi g vanced. again. The free. end of the finger thus begins to feel a coin after the leading edge of the coin passes the finger. In short, lever l6 normally urges the finger into coin-obstructing position.- The impact: of; a oin t rn-ins e. cradle and pushing on. arm causes the finger to be wi h rawn A he co n. pres es. ains Pr ction 15., it moves the lever I8, to its extreme clockwise (Figs. 6 and; 9;) position. This arm, during its travel, in turn lifts the latch or fin er is (which is adaptedto int r ept. per or ted coins, hereinafter deseribed), completely out of the path of said coin, permitting its. passage downwardly to. the: magnetic and resilience tests, hereinafter describedprovided the coin, so felt by finger l8, doesnothave, a central perforation.

Referring to Figure. 3, when an undersized; coin is inserted, its movement is shown by the; dotted outlines. In its downward.- movem nt. t fi contacts projection lb of lever: L6. Its impact against this projectioncauses; it to; bounce slight- 1y to the, left and thus. passbetween projections 3; and. I4 w thou c ntac ng. either The c then drops directly downwardly until it contacts the inwardly projecting shelf I-9 (shown in Figure 4) formed from mainplate I, Contact with shelf l9 causes the coin to be deflected; into rejection passageway 20. This rejection passageway 20, may be arranged in the same manner-as the rejection hopper shown in my U. S. Patent No. 2,326,214 or in any suitable manner well known to the art. An. importantfunction of the projection [5. on lever l6,is topreventanllndersizecoin from hitting or. strilringprojection L4 androcking the cradle.

s sh wn y F ure when an. ov rsize. c in is inserted into. entrance 9; it ,maybe, stopped w e projection l3 on; the. cradle. a d? a e: jection I5 of the lever I6 which has moved provent 2,326,214, for example.

jection [5 to the right to its extreme position, or if extremely oversize, it may be stopped between projection l3 and scavenger arm 26 shown in Figure 10. In either case, the oversize coin must be lifted from slot 9 or rejected by enlarging the space between plate I and gate 2. This is accomplished by the swinging action of the gate 2. This swinging action is effected by normal downward movement of the operating lever 22, shown in Figure 4, pivotally mounted at 23 and held in a horizontal normal position by a coil spring 24. Means for pivotally mounting an operating lever and holding it in normal position by spring-bias are well known to the art. Atypical arrangement is shown in my U, S. Pat- As the operating lever 22 is pressed downwardly, a twofold action is effected. Pin 25, attached to the lever 22 and projecting a slot in the plate I, normally extends into a depression formed in gate 2. As the operating lever 22 and pin 25 move downe wardly, pin 25 presses against the inside of gate 2, causing it to swing outwardly, thus enlarging the width of slot 9;. In other words, the gate 2 is turned about pintle 4, in a counterclockwise direction (Fig. 2 Simultaneously with the aforesaid movement of pin 25, the downward movement of said pin also causes a clockwise (Fig. 3) turn ofthe scavenger wiper 26, a pin 25 strikes the. lower edge of hole- 21, offsetfrom pivot 28. (The scavenger wiper is shown in normal position n Figure 1, en in bot n r and scavenging positions in Figure 10.) The wiper is pivotally o nted at 280 at n the eccentric movement of pin 25. in hole 2:1 forcing the wiper 26 downwardly and to-the left, any spurious coin with a hole in it, caught on the in;- tercepting latch- It, or any coin failing to. pass the magnetic test, hereinafter described, is. defiected by the wiper 26 into, rejection passageway 20 and away from the coin acceptance passage; The function; ofthe wiper 26 is; t knock any eoin (in the space between gate 2 and plate I) inte the rejection pathway 20;, as the gate 2 is opened:- It will hereinafter be shown in detail how projection 29 of strip 30,- causes anyoversize coin st pped by projection [3. or any coin with a circular hole suspended on. feeler L8; to be dropped into that space as. the gate-1S. Opened.

Referring to. Fi ure 6, when a spurious coin of the same diameter and; weight as a legitimate coin, but with. a. hole or opening at or near the center, is inserted in. slot 9;, said coin, similar to. the action. of a. legitimate coin, will fall be.- tween projections litand- M. of the cradle land the clockwise rdtationof; the cradle I10: will pro-.- J'ect the coinl crally he ight until it con-.- tacts projectionjfiof; lever l6, thus; moving lever I6 clockwise (Fig-a. 5);. This movementof lever It, which is linkedwith the finger or latch l 8-,,as shown in Figure.- 7,. causesthefinger to move. out.- wardly from. platev I;, thus; ermitting. the inner end of the finger l8 to ride; Qnthe: surface of the coin until. the. instant that. thehole pass s nd the end of finger; L8, The; finger 13;. moves through; the positi ns.- shown in sa 1?? that. shown. n F 9;. p rmittin the; cadine ed fi ofv the coi to pass. t eIOWe nde lnsen which lower endthenlpressesi against. the flat surface of the. coin. as the-eountenweighton lever It ur es the lever" eonu re e w se The; fin er feels, the; flat surface; of: the; coin until the hole in. the coin registers.v with; the finger. When a hole; so registers, the; parts assume. the; positions shown in Fig. I;. The; weight of, lever 1,6 then automatically forces the end of finger 18 through 3| and screw 32 (shown in Figure 1). In order that the inwardly bent free end 29 of strip 30 may function to remove coins from finger l8, it is necessary so to arrange strip 30, with its body portion raised from the gate by element 28, that projection 29 remains stationaryrelative to plate I during the initial part of the outwardswing of the gate. be seen that as the gate 2 begins to swing outwardly any coin held by feeler [8 will be carried along until it contacts end 29 of strip 30, which contact causes the coin to be dropped into the space between gate 2 and plate I, where it is scavenged and sent to the coin rejection pathway 29. After the coins have been knocked into that space, projection 29 may then move outwardly with the gate, Any suitable well-known expedient may be used for obtaining this action of projection 29. A prior-art expedient for performing this function is shown in U. S. Patent No. 2,292,628, for example.

As shown in Figures 8 and 9, the finger 18, which is linked to counterweighted lever I9, is held in position by a plate 34. The latter is provided with a grooved recess in its rear face in which the shaft of finger I8 is rotatably mounted and held in position when the plate 34 is fastened to the gate 2 by means of pin 35 and screw 35 (see Figures 3, 6 and Figures 7 and 9 also show, respectively, the position of the intercepting finger 18 when holding a coin, and when the coin is being felt by feeler l8.

Referring to Figure 10, when a spurious coin which has passed all previous tests, such as diameter, thickness, weight and absence of any hole, it must then pass the magnetic test. This is provided by permanent magnets fastened to the front and rear faces of plate I. Magnet 31 is fastened to the front face of plate I by screws and projects through swinging plate 2. Said magnet is shown in full in Figure 1. The opposing magnet 39, fastened to the rear of plate I, is shown in Figure 2. The eddy currents set up by the magnets separate coin slugs having different electrical resistivities. When a spurious coin is stopped in the coin passageway by the action of these magnets, the passageway is cleared by the combined action of the outwardly swinging motion of gate 2 and scavenger wiper 26, initiated by depressing the operating lever 22, previously described.

In order to control the rolling motion of the coin as it enters into the magnetic field, the space between the wiper blade 26 and the coin runway 55 should be held fairly close. If a ferromagnetic slug of proper size were deposited in the unit, it would be arrested by the magnets. If the wiper blade 26 starts its downward swin at the moment the operating lever 22 is actuated, it would be possible to jam the coin between the coin runway and the wiper blade. To avoid this, the hole 21 in the wiper blade 26 is so arranged that when operating lever 22 starts its downward movement, the stud 25 on the operating lever will travel a predetermined distance before engaging with the lower part of the opening 2'] in the wiper blade, setting up a timed de- By reference to Figsl and 6 it will- 6 my. This timed delay is sufficient to aiiow the gate to start swinging away from the main plate I, thereby moving the coin runway out of the path of the slug, which will be wiped away from the magnetic field as the operating lever 22 is depressed all the way. a

Any coin which passes the magnetic test, after having passed all prior tests, must pass the final test for resilience. As the coin passes the various tests previously described, it continues to fall.

downwardly to the right through the passageway between plate I and gate 2 until it strikes:

anvil 40, shown in Figure 1. If it has the proper resilience, it bounces to the left and passes into If not of the- The gate 2, the strip 39 and the means for mounting the strip, the runway 55, the lugs 50, the spring 3|, and the coin receiving, accepting, and rejecting pathways are known to the art, especially in view of the above-mentioned patents and are not per se claimed herein.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. In a coin selecting apparatus of the character described, including a coin receiving pathway, a coin acceptance pathway and a coin rejection pathway; the combination of a pivotally mounted cradle having a pair of spaced projections normally extending into the coin receiving pathway and spaced apart to by-pass therebetween a coin having a diameter less than a coin of acceptable diameter and to engage a coin of acceptable diameter between said projections to divert said coin into the acceptance pathway, one of said projections being downwardly shiftable and adjacent the acceptance pathway; and a third projection independently mounted with respect to said cradle and normally projecting into both the coin receiving pathway and the coin acceptance pathway at :a point adjacent to but above said downwardly shiftable projection of the pivoted cradle, whereby a coin moving along the coin receiving pathway will impinge said third projection prior to engaging the projections of the cradle, whereby the coin will be deflected and excessive velocity of the coin checked as it enters the cradle and will again impinge said third projection as it enters the acceptance pathway and as it tilts said cradle about its pivot due to its weight; said third projection being carried on the end of a weighted arm adapted for limited lateral movement with respect to the coin receiving pathway and said third projection being located in the path of movement of the coin during tilting of the cradle; together with a surface feeling finger normally in the coin acceptance pathway, and means responsive to the movement of the third projection to lift the surface feeling finger momentarily as the pivoted cradle places the coin in the acceptance pathway.

2. In a coin selecting apparatus of the character described, including a coin receiving pathway, a coin acceptance pathway and a coin rejection pathway; the combination of a pivotally mounted counterbalanced cradle having a pair of spaced projections comprising a downwardly shiftable projection on the side of the cradle adjacent the acceptance pathway and an upwardly shiftable projection on the opposite side thereof, with both of said projections normally extending into the coin receiving pathway and spaced apart tobypass -therebetween a coinhaving a diameter;

less than-a coin of acceptable diameter and to engage acoin of acceptable diameter between said projections todivertsaidcoin' into the-acceptance pathway; and a third; projection in.-

dependently mounted with respect to said cradle and normally projecting into the coin receiving pathway at a point adjacent to" but above the downwardly shiftabl'e projection of the pivoted cradle, whereby a coin moving along the coin receiving pathway will impinge said third projection prior to engaging theprojections of the cradle, whereby the coin will be deflected to a position equally spaced between said projections as it enters the cradle so that the cradle will be tiltedabout its pivot by the weight of the coin rather than by the impact thereof; said third projection being'carried on the end of a weighted I arm adapted for limited lateral'movement with respect to th coin receiving pathway and said third projection being locatedin the path of movement of the coin during tilting of said cradle.

apart toby'pass therebetween a' coinhaving a diameter less than a coin of a'cc'eptable'diam'eter andto" engage acoin of acceptable diameter be tween'sa'id' projections to divert'said' coin into the acceptance pathway; and a third projection in dependently and pivotally mounted with respect to said' cradle and normally proj'ectin'g'into the coin receiving pathway at 'af'point adj a'een't to but above the acwnwardiy shiftablepro'j'ection of the pivoted cradle; wherebya coin moving along the coin receiving pathway will impinge said'third projection prior to engaging the projections of the cradle, whereb 'lthe coin' will be deflected 'to' a positio'ri equa1ly"'sp'acedbetween said" projecf tions asit enters the cradle-so that thecr'adle will be tiltedabbut it's pivdt by the Weight of the Coin:

rather than by the impact thereof, 'said' third projection being -positioned with relation to said downwardlyshiftable projection so that the'third projection engages the coin for a' period duringtilting" of the cradle.

4- n a coin selectin apperatusoithe char.- acter described, including a coin receiving pathway, a coin acceptance pathway. and a coin rejection pathway; the combination of a pivotally mounted cradle having a pair of spacedprojec: tions normally extending into thecoin receiving pathway and spaced apart to, bypass therebee tween a coin having a diameter less than a coin of acceptable diameter and to engage a coin of acceptable, diameter between said. projections to divert s'a'id coininto thezacceptance pathway, one of saidoproj'ections being. downwardly shiftable and adjacent the acceptance pathway; and a third'projec'tion independently mounted with respect' to s'aidcradlea'nd normally projecting into. both the coin receiving pathway and the coin acce'ptance pathway at apoint. adjacent to .but above said downwardly shiftable'projection of the pivoted cradle; whereby a coin moving longgthe coin receiving. pathway will'impinge said third. projection prior to'engaging the. projections of the cradle; whereby the coinwill be deflected and excessive velocity of the coin'che'cked as it enters the cradle" and will again impinge said' third projection a's it enters the acceptance pathway and'as' it tilts said cradle about 'its'pivot due to 1 its weight, said third projection being located'in the path "of movement ofthe' coin duringtilting of the cradle; together with a surface feeling fin ger normally in the coin acceptancepathway, and means responsive to'themovementbf the third projection to lift'the surf'a'defeeling finger momentarilyas the pivote'dcradle places the 'coin'in the acceptance pathway.

JOHN G'OT;IFRIED.' REFEnENoss cr mp The following references are of" record in" the file of thispatent:

UNITED sTATE's'PNI'ENTs

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2822075 *May 29, 1952Feb 4, 1958Nat Rejectors GmbhCoin separators
US2931480 *May 20, 1954Apr 5, 1960Nat Rejectors GmbhCoin separators
US2934190 *Apr 6, 1956Apr 26, 1960Nat Rejectors GmbhCoin separators
US3145821 *May 18, 1961Aug 25, 1964Reed Electromech CorpCoin testing device
US3155214 *Feb 6, 1961Nov 3, 1964Coin Acceptors IncCoin selecting apparatus
US3430746 *May 15, 1967Mar 4, 1969Northwestern Corp TheMerchandise vending machine with combination rotary coin mechanism and slug rejector
US3625329 *Aug 21, 1969Dec 7, 1971Vendall Machines LtdCradle locking arrangement for coin sorter
US4706795 *Dec 16, 1985Nov 17, 1987Kabushiki Kaisha NipponcoincoCoin discriminator
DE1228839B *Nov 30, 1953Nov 17, 1966Nat Rejectors GmbhMuenzpruefer fuer Selbstverkaeufer
DE1260840B *Jan 5, 1962Feb 8, 1968Vendo CoMuenzpruefeinrichtung
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/332, 194/336, 194/345
Cooperative ClassificationG07D5/00
European ClassificationG07D5/00