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Publication numberUS2569721 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 2, 1951
Filing dateMay 16, 1949
Priority dateMay 16, 1949
Publication numberUS 2569721 A, US 2569721A, US-A-2569721, US2569721 A, US2569721A
InventorsEdward H Juers
Original AssigneeEdward H Juers
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Foot support
US 2569721 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 2, 1951 E H JUERS 2,569,721

FOOT SUPPORT Filed May 16, 1949 2 Sheets-Sheet l oct 2, 1951 E. H. JUERs 2,569,721

FOOT SUPPORT Filed May 16, 1949 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Oct. 2, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE FOOT SUPPORT Edward H. Juers, Red Wing, Minn.

Application May V16, 1949, Serial No. 93,467 claims. (c1. ass-71) ing points of the forefoot, namely, the metatarsal heads and the proximal phalanges of the toes.

When this anatomical arrangement exists, the major portion of the weight bearing is done by the second, third, and fourth metatarsals, and

their underlying structures. This anomaly is the most common cause of metatarsalgia and the development of callouses on the plantar surface of the foot beneath the central metatarsals, as well as pronated feet and traumatic arthritis.

The primary object of my invention is the provision of a novel device which may be secured within a shoe, either at the time of its manufacture or thereafter, and which will so support the abnormal short first and fifth metatarsals as to evenly distribute the load-carrying weight of the entire foot, thereby increasing the foot comfort of the wearer as Well as preventing occurrence of ailments of the above type.

Another object of my invention is the provision of a structure of the type immediately above-described which is relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which may be easily and accurately positioned within the shoe of any given wearer, and which when once applied to a given shoe will give long troublefree and comfortable service.

The above and still further objects of my invention will become apparent from the following detailed specification, appended claims, and attached drawings.

Referring to the drawings, wherein like characters indicate like parts throughout the several views:

Fig. l is a view in plan of the skeletal portions of a foot properly positioned on my device;

Fig. 2 is a diagrammatical side elevation, as seen from the inner side of the foot;

Fig. 3 is a view in bottom plan of my novel support applied to a removable inner-sole adapted to be placed Within a wearers shoe;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary longitudinal section, taken on the line 4 4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a view corresponding to Fig. 2, but showing a forefoot in plantar flexion, some parts beine broken away:

Fig. `6 is a side elevation of the skeletal por-l tions of the foot of Fig. 5;

Fig. '7 is a fragmentary view in front elevation of the metatarsals, being taken substantially on the line 1-1 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a plan of my novel device;

Fig. 9 is a front elevation of Fig. 8;

Fig. 10 is a view corresponding to Fig. 8, showing a modified form of the invention, some parts being broken away; and

Fig. 11 is a frontelevation of the modification of Fig. 10.

Referring with greater particularity to the structure as illustrated in Figs. 1-9 inclusive, my novel device is indicated, in its entirety, by the numeral l and comprises a pair of spaced fingers 2 and 3 respectively which are joined at their inner ends by a transverse connecting member or portion, identified by the numeral 4. Together, the elements 2, 3, and 4, make up a supporting member for the melatarsals and other supporting bones of the forefoot, as will hereinafter be explained in detail.

Preferably and as shown, a tongue 5 projects rearwardly from the central portion of the connecting member 4. As shown, the forward ends of the lingers 2 and 3 are provided with bevelled edges 6, and the forward edge of the intermediate portion 4 is bevelled as indicated at l. Referring particularly to Figs. 8 and 9, it will be seen that the connecting member 4 is preferably reduced in thickness for a purpose which will hereinafer become apparent.

Referring to Figs. 3 and 4, it will be seen that the rearwardly-projecting tongue 5 is adapted to be inserted through a transverse slit 8 in one of the layers of the laminated inner-sole 9. Innersole 9 may be built into the shoe or may be sold as an accessory in combination with my novel device. In either event, it is adapted to ble snugly inserted in the shoe overlying the main sole. Supporting member I may be made from any relatively soft compressible material such as sponge rubber.

It might here be stated that in the normal foot the forward ends of the first, second, third, fourth, and fifth metatarsals terminate substantially in a diagonal line, defining the axis of plantar flexion, the first metatarsal being the major weight-bearing point. In the event of metatarsal disproportion, the forward ends of the second, third, and fourth metatarsals terminate substantially at the same diagonal line or axis (see line A-A of Fig. 1), Whereas the forward ends of the first and fifth metatarsals terminate y short of this line or axis. When a foot having velopment of excruciating pains, callouses on theY plantar surfaces of the foot beneath the central Vmetatarsals, and traumatic arthritis.

I havefound that, by elevating and supporting certain portions of the rst and fifth metatarsals and portions of other bones of the forefoot, an abnormal foot of the type above-described will be caused to function in a normal manner, thereby overcoming the tendency of the foot to pronate. Furthermore, I have found particularly in young patients, that when the foot in ywhich metatarsal disproportion is present is properly. supported by my novel structure, curative effects may be frequently expected.

When it is'desired to properly position the supporting member Yl within a shoe, such as indicated by dotted lines B in Figs. 2 and 5, the tongue 5 is, as above indicated, inserted through `the slit 8 in the bottom layer of a laminated inner-sole 9. The longer supporting finger, identiiied by the numeral 2, is positioned under the first metatarsal. When positioned, the shorter Vsupporting finger 3 will be positioned under the fifth metatarsal. Inorder to obtain the full fruits of my invention, the projected forward ends of Y the fingers 2 and 3 arepositioned` so that they terminate substantially on a line coincidental with the'axis of plantar flexion of the second,V

' fingers 2 third, and'fourthmetatarsals (identified by line l Y A-A in Fig. 1) of the foot of Ya given wearer. The first metatarsal is indicated by the letter c, the second metatarsal by d, the third by the fourth by f, and the fifth by y. Other bones in the forefoot needing identiiication areV proximal Y Y bevelled endsV 6 of the fingers 2 and 3 permit the forward ends of the proximal phalanges h cooperating with the metatarsals c and g to comfortably rest at the same level as the phalanges cooperating with the second, third, and fourth meta tarsals d, e, and f respectivey. The bevelled edge 1, together with the vbevelled edges 6 enable the inner-sole 9 to be molded to the necessary contours so as to provide a comfortable platform for the forefoot. When the foot is in plantar flexion, the second, third, and fourth metatarsals d, e, and f respectively, extend downwardly to a level indicated by a broken line C-C in Figs. 6 and 7.

The lower forward or distal ends of the hrst and fifth metatarsals c and y respectively are supportedfat a level indicated in Figs..6 and '7 by the broken line D-D, vby the lingers Vl. and 3 respectively.v Y This support underlies and elevates the heads of the first and fifth metatarsals b and g respectively and the portion of the proximal phalanges h cooperating therewith behind the axis A--A to a level which assures symmetrical distribution of weight for all metatarsals. and

4 proximal phalanges. This symmetrical distribution of weight is further enhanced by the reduced thickness of the transverse connecting portion 4. The forward ends of the toes are at a common level at all times and a natural foot action is thus assured.

Inrthe modified form of my invention illustrated in Figs. 10 and 11, the transverse connecting member 4f is made up of flat overlapping elements I0, one each formed integrally'with and projecting laterally from one of the supporting and 3 respectively. A tongue 5 Drolects rearwardly from preferably both of the overlapping elements I!) for insertion into slit 8.

i vIt should beobvious that this arrangement permits lateraladjustability of the supporting lingers 2 and 3' to accommodate feet of various widths. If desired, the device may beV impregnated with material that is opaque to X-rays so that the proper positioning thereof may be'aocomplished with the aid of a fluoroscope.; 1 Y.

My device` has been thoroughly tested and found to be entirely adequate'for the accomplishment of the .above objectives; and, while. I have shown a preferred form and a single modication of my invention, it, should beunderstoodthat the same is capable of further modiiicationwithout departure from the spirit'and. ,Scope of the invention as denned in the appended claims.

WhatI claim is: Y Y 1. A supplementary supporting member adapted to be secured within a shoe tooverlie the intermediate portion of the sole thereof, said member having spaced, generally forwardly-extended arms and a transverse connectingpQrtQn, Said arms when properly positioned adapted. to. ter minate substantially on alincCOnCdental with the axis of plantar iiexion of the-second, third, and fourth metatarsals, ofthe footof the wearer, the. connecting portion of said supporting member adapted to underlie the intermediatey portion of the second, third, and fourthjmetatarsals, said connecting member comprising overlapping elements formed integrally one each with one of said fingers in a manner to permit lateral adjustment of said fingers one with respect to the other.

Y 2. A supplementary supporting member .adapted to be secured withina shoe to overlie the intermediate portion of the sole thereof, said member having spaced generally forwardly-extended iingers and a transverse connecting portion, said fingers when properly positioned adapted to terminate substantially Orl. a line coincidental with the axis of plantarxexion of the second, third, and fourth 'metatarsals of the foot of the wearer, the connecting portion of said sup.- portine member adapted to underlie the intermediate portion of the second. third, and fourth metatarsals, said finger beingV of Vgreater'thickness 'than said transverse connecting portion.

3. A supplementary supporting meinberadapted Vto be secured within Va shoe to. overlie-the intermediate portion of the sole thereof; said member having spaced generally Yforwardly-extended fingers and a transverse connecting por- V tion, said lingers when properly positioned adapted to terminate substantially on a line coincidental with the axis of plantar Vflexion of the second, third, and fourth metatarsals of the foot of the wearer, the connecting portion of Y an inner-sole of a shoe to anchor said supporting member against movement.

f1. A supplementary supporting member adapted to be secured within a shoe to overlie the intermediate portion of the sole thereof, said member having spaced generally forwardly-extended fingers and a transverse connecting portion, said fingers when properly positioned adapted to terminate substantially on a line coincidental with the axis of plantar exion of the second, third, and fourth metatarsals of the foot of the wearer, the connecting portion of said supporting member adapted to underlie the intermediate portion of the second, third, and fourth metatarsals, said connecting member comprising overlapping elements formed integrally one each with one of said fingers in a manner to permit lateral adjustment of said fingers one with respect to the other, one of said elements being provided With a rearwardly-projecting tongue adapted to be inserted into a transverse slit in the inner-sole of a shoe to anchor the supporting member against movement.

5. The structure defined in claim 2 in which said supporting member is formed from compressable resilient material.

- EDWARD H. JUERS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,841,942 Fenton Jan. 19, 1932 1,847,973 Morton Mar. 1, 1932 1,974,161 Riley Sept. 18, 1934 2,027,072 Tweede Jan. 7, 1936 2,106,508 Shaw Jan. 25, 1938 2,287,341 Burns June 23, 1942 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 451,949 Germany Oct.. 29, 1927 523,718 Germany Apr. 27, 1931

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1841942 *Apr 11, 1929Jan 19, 1932Fenton JohnCushioned insole
US1847973 *Jun 20, 1927Mar 1, 1932Dudley J MortonMeans for compensating for foot abnormalities
US1974161 *Jul 18, 1932Sep 18, 1934William J RileyArch supporter
US2027072 *May 27, 1933Jan 7, 1936Charles TweedieSock lining for shoes
US2106508 *Aug 18, 1933Jan 25, 1938Robert W ShawInsole
US2287341 *Jun 2, 1941Jun 23, 1942William C BurnsBody-weight-distributing construction for shoes and the like
DE451949C *Dec 17, 1926Oct 29, 1927Karl W Fischer DrEinrichtung an Schuhsohlen zur Beeinflussung von Fussgewoelbesenkungen
DE523718C *Dec 1, 1927Apr 27, 1931Engelhardt & Co GSchuheinlage mit Gewoelbestuetzbogen und Unterlagsplatte
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4841648 *Feb 29, 1988Jun 27, 1989Shaffer David EPersonalized insole kit
US4939852 *Dec 8, 1987Jul 10, 1990Edeltraud BrennerElastic foot support to be built-in or inserted in shoes
US5545129 *Feb 13, 1995Aug 13, 1996Snook; Kim C.Supportive foot cushion device
US6968637Mar 6, 2002Nov 29, 2005Nike, Inc.Sole-mounted footwear stability system
US7263788Jun 30, 2005Sep 4, 2007Nike, Inc.Sole-mounted footwear stability system
WO2003075698A1 *Mar 5, 2003Sep 18, 2003Jeffrey L JohnsonSole-mounted footwear stability system
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/145
International ClassificationA43B7/22
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/1445, A43B7/22, A43B7/1435, A43B7/1425
European ClassificationA43B7/14A20F, A43B7/14A20B, A43B7/14A20M, A43B7/22