Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2570041 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 2, 1951
Filing dateMar 10, 1947
Priority dateMar 10, 1947
Publication numberUS 2570041 A, US 2570041A, US-A-2570041, US2570041 A, US2570041A
InventorsWedmore Hardin S
Original AssigneeWedmore Hardin S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Soldering iron stand
US 2570041 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 2, 1951 5, WEDMQRE 2,570,041

SOLDERING IRON STAND Filed March 10, 1947 INVENTOR. (64201 lt ionokf M/ka mag Patented Oct. 2, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 11 Claims.

This invention relates to a soldering iron stand and has for one of its objects the provision of a stand adapted to support a soldering iron during intervals between use, and which stand includes means for preventing scaling and oxidation of the tip.

Another object of the invention is the provision. of a stand for electric soldering irons that includes means for controlling the temperature of such irons and for preventing scaling of the tip.

currences has been to place the iron in a holder that dissipates the heat to a degree that tends to prevent overheating of the tip. Other methods include thermostatically controlled devices associated with the stands for regulating the temperature of the irons placed on the stands. However, insofar as I am aware said stands and devices do not prevent scaling, although they may tend to retard it.

With the present invention the temperature of the iron placed on the stand is maintained at the desired point and the tendency of the iron to scale is substantially eliminated.

Other objects and advantages will appear in the drawing and description.

In the drawings,

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of the stand; partly in section.

Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken along line 2-2 of Fig. 1. i

Fig. 3 is a sectional View taken along line 3-3 of Fig. 2.

In detail, the stand illustrated comprises an elongated container I that is adapted to lie hori- "zontally on one of its sides when in use, the said container having a flat side 2 (Fig. 3 adapted to support the container in a stable position on a horizontal surface.

At one end of said container is a filling opening that is closed by a quick detach-able conventional closure cap 3 (Fig. 1) while the other end. P '6 is flat and adapted to support the container on ing perforated sides, said channel extending longitudinally of the container, I and centrally of .its upper side. This, channel 4 terminates at one end in a. cylindrical extension 5. that. projects to 'modate the stand to different irons. end I3 of the U-shaped wire is adapted to enone side of the container. The sides of said extension are imperforate and it is of a length to fully enclose the tip of a soldering iron (Fig. 1 when the shell I that encloses the heating element of a conventional electric soldering iron is in channel 4 adjacent the extension 5, and when the tubular shank 8 that connects between handle 9 and said shell 1 extends in channel member 4 across the top of container I.

The sides of channel member 4 are preferably of progressively decreasing height in a direction extending away from extension 5, and the end of th channel member 4 opposite extension 5 may almost come to a point at the bottom side of the channel adjacent end 4.

As above mentioned, the channel member 4 is preferably perforated, and in the portion of the sides of the channel that are adjacent extension 5, pairs of said perforations I0 may be in axial alignment in opposite sides of the channel member for receiving the oppositely outwardly directed ends I I of a generally U-shaped elongated wire, the legs of which are designated I2 (Fig. 2) and the closed end being designated I3.

The legs I2 preferably ext nd toward each other adjacent the ends I I as indicated at I4 for supporting the shell of the iron, and the ends II are positioned in the pair of aligned openings I0 that will position closed end I3 of the wire so that it will engage handle 9 when the tip 6 is in proper position enclosed within extension '5. Thus, end II may function to provide a stop and position indicator for the iron, and as the wire support may be so moved as to position end I I at different distances from extension 5, it will be, seen that means is provided to accom- The closed gage the shank 8 of the wire adjacent handle 9 to resist any tendency of the iron to tilt when in the position seen in Fig. 1, although a certain amount of tilt would not materially change the result accomplished.

A conduit I5 extends from a point adjacent the bottom 2 and cap 3 of the container to a point within extension 5, and a portion I6 of the conduit that is in extension 5 may extend above the bottom of the latter and have its upper side removed so that any liquid flowing into hem. his lay r may be f any su ta l no flammable material such as asbestos, spun glass, etc.

Within container I may be any suitable heat vaporizable antiscaling liquid, such as distilled water and bismuth-carbonate preferably in the ratio of about /2 pint of water to /2 teaspoonful of the bismuth-carbonate. Or valve oil and alcohol may be used or any other suitable antiscaling liquid of which there are a number.

In actual practice, the Wire in channel member 4 prevents the tip of the iron from contacting anything within extension 5, and heat from the iron will heat the conduit I5 that extends into the container causing sufficient evaporation of the liquid within the container to force liquid into portion i6 where it is vaporized, some overflowing for absorption by the porous material of the liner.

The vapors within extensions 5 surround the tip and are in engagement therewith, thus preventing oxidation and sealing of the tip. A transfer of heat to the vapors also occurs tending to prevent overheating of the tip.

Usually the operator merely tips the container, upon first using the stand so that some liquid will fiow into portion Hi to Wet the asbestos or other similar material held by the screen. Thereafter sufiicient moisture will automatically be supplied to produce the desired vapors.

The screen liner in extension 5 functions to tend to retain the vapors in the extension from escaping through the open ends, and it is very effective in performing this function.

When the stand is not in use, the operator may merely stand it on end for convenience, although it may be allowed to lie flat if desired.

It is to be understood that the detailed description and drawings are not intended to be restrictive of the invention, but are merely illustrative of a preferred form thereof.

I claim:

1. In combination with a container adapted to contain a supply of heat vaporizable antiscaling liquid, means for supporting a hot soldering iron adjacent said container for vaporizing said liquid in the said container and for creating a slight vapor pressure in said container, means for conducting liquid under said pressure to a point adjacent the tip of said iron for vaporizing said liquid at said point, a shield around said tip when supported on said first mentioned means for causing the vapors generated at said point to surround said tip in engagement therewith.

2. In combination with a container adapted to contain a supply of heat vaporizable antiscaling liquid, means for supporting a hot soldering iron adjacent said container for vaporizing said liquid in the said container and for creating a slight vapor pressure in said container, means for conducting liquid under said pressure to a point adjacent the tip of said iron for vaporizing said liquid at said point, a shield around said tip when supported on said first mentioned means for causing the vapors generated at said point to surround said tip in engagement therewith, said first mentioned means being adapted to support said iron with said tip in spaced relation to said shield.

3. A soldering iron stand comprising a container for a heat vaporizable anti-scaling liquid, a member on said container for supporting said iron in a generally horizontally extending position with its tip offset to one side of said container but adjacent thereto, means for conducting liquid from said container to a point adjacent and below said tip for vaporization of said liquid at said point whereby said vapors will engage said tip upon rising.

4. A soldering iron stand comprising a container for a heat vaporizable anti-scaling liquid, a member on said container for supporting said iron in a generally horizontally extending position with its tip offset to one side of said container but adjacent thereto, means for conducting liquid from said container to a point adjacent and below said tip for vaporization of said liquid at said point whereby said vapors will engage said tip upon rising, means for retaining said Vapors around said tip.

5. A soldering iron stand comprising a container for a heat vaporizable anti-scaling liquid, a member on said container for supporting said iron in a generally horizontally extending position with its tip offset to one side of said container but adjacent thereto, means for conducting liquid from said container to a point adjacent and below said tip for vaporization of said liquid at said point whereby said vapors will engage said tip upon rising, means for retaining said vapors around said tip including a. cylindrical body of non-inflammable relatively porous material.

6. A soldering iron stand comprising a container for a heat vaporizable anti-scaling liquid, a member on said container for supporting said iron in a generally horizontally extending position with its tip offset to one side of said container but adjacent thereto, means for conducting liquid from said container to a point adjacent and below said tip for vaporization of said liquid at said point whereby said vapors will engage said tip upon rising, an open-ended tube of perforated sheet material in which said tip is adapted to be inserted when on said member, said conduit opening at its discharge end into said tube.

7. A soldering iron stand comprising a container for a heat vaporizable anti-scaling liquid, a member on said container for supporting said iron in a generally horizontally extending position with its tip offset to one side of said container but adjacent thereto, means for conducting liquid from said container to a point adjacent and below said tip for vaporization of said liquid at said point whereby said vapors will engage said tip upon rising, an open-ended tube of perforated sheet material in which said tip is adapted to be inserted when on said member, said conduit opening at its discharge end into said tube, and a tubular liner of screen ma-- terial within said tube.

8. A soldering iron stand comprising a container for a heat vaporizable anti-scaling liquid, a tubular open-ended shield secured to said container and projecting laterally from said container, said shield being adapted to receive the tip of said iron therein when the latter is in a position extends across the top of said container, means for supporting said iron on said container in said position, means for conducting liquid from the said container into said shield for vaporizing by the heat from said tip.

9. A soldering iron stand comprising a container for a heat vaporizable anti-scaling liquid, a tubular open-ended shield secured to said container and projecting laterally from said container, said shield being adapted to receive the tip of said iron therein when the latter is in a position extends across the top of said container, means for supporting said iron on said container in said position, means for conducting liquid from the said container into said shield for vaporizing by the heat from said tip, means connected with said shield for supporting said tip spaced within said shield.

10. A soldering iron stand comprising a container for a heat vaporizable anti-scaling liquid, a tubular open-ended shield secured to said container and projecting laterally from said container, said shield being adapted to receive the tip of said iron therein When the latter is in a position extends across the top of said container,

means for supporting said iron on said container in said position, means for conducting liquid from the said container into said shield for vaporizing by the heat from said tip, means connected with said shield for supporting said tip spaced within said shield, and a relatively porous liner within said shield for tending to retain said vapors Within said shield and around said tip.

11. A soldering iron stand comprising a container for a heat vaporizable anti-scaling liquid, a tubular open-ended shield secured to said container and projecting laterally from said container, said shield being adapted to receive the 6 tip of said iron therein when the latter is in a position extends across the top of said container, means for supporting said iron on said container in said position, means for conducting liquid from said container into said shield for vaporizing by the heat from said tip, and a tubular screen within said shield for extending around said tip when the arm is in said position.

HARDIN S. WEDMORE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 815,313 Sweeney -1. Mar. 13, 1906 851,865 Conant Apr. 30, 1907 919,710 Gero Apr. 27, 1909 1,401,514 Blake Dec. 27, 1921 1,497,104 Lamb -1 June 10, 1924 1,908,055 Riley May 9, 1933 1,996,564 Blanchet Apr. 2, 1935 2,103,709 Cann Dec. 28, 1937 2,289,890 Walter July 14, 1942 2,308,089 Neal Jan. 12, 1943 2,338,433 Holden Jan. 4, 1944

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US815313 *Feb 13, 1905Mar 13, 1906Pacific Surgical Mfg CompanyPortable sterilizing apparatus.
US851865 *Jun 30, 1905Apr 30, 1907Briscoe Mfg CoTool-heating furnace.
US919710 *May 28, 1908Apr 27, 1909Alphonse J GeroSterilizer.
US1401514 *Mar 12, 1919Dec 27, 1921James BlakeSoldering-furnace
US1497104 *Jul 21, 1923Jun 10, 1924Lamb Erwin HSoldering-iron heating furnace
US1908055 *Oct 20, 1932May 9, 1933Riley Herbert EFumigator
US1996564 *Jan 5, 1934Apr 2, 1935Blanchet Ovila JFurnace sealing device and gas control
US2103709 *Dec 5, 1931Dec 28, 1937Harry E CannSterilizer
US2289890 *Feb 2, 1939Jul 14, 1942Carl W WalterCleaning and sterilizing instruments and other articles
US2308089 *Apr 5, 1941Jan 12, 1943Mcclary Archie WBung opening construction
US2338433 *Sep 12, 1941Jan 4, 1944Holden Artemas FSalt bath for heating soldering irons
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3705680 *Jun 8, 1970Dec 12, 1972Siegel William JordanTool holder
US3948678 *Jan 7, 1974Apr 6, 1976John DezzaniSolder iron dressing system having a teflon packing
US3990623 *May 5, 1975Nov 9, 1976Fortune William SHolder system for soldering instrument
US4118821 *May 13, 1977Oct 10, 1978American Electrical Heater CompanyDevice for cleaning soldering iron tips
US4762979 *Dec 4, 1986Aug 9, 1988Geoffroi Louis E GHolder for holding an electric soldering iron in a use or a standby/storage position
US7950564 *Apr 24, 2009May 31, 2011Inventec CorporationSoldering iron device, soldering iron control module and soldering control method thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification219/230, 219/386, 219/439, 228/57, 219/436, 228/18, 219/242
International ClassificationD06F79/00, D06F79/02
Cooperative ClassificationD06F79/02
European ClassificationD06F79/02